Home Made Anchor Reel
Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    Loyal TF Poster - Not a Tidal Fish Subscriber
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    1,357

    Default Home Made Anchor Reel

    I have been using my home made anchor reel. The reel passed my test.
    I made the reel because 1) I want to drop the anchor fast 2) Easy to adjust the length of the anchor line 3) tougher than the plastic one in the market, and 4) smaller


    Anchor and Anchor Reel:


    Parts for Reel:


    Parts for the Reel – where the parts go:


    Parts:
    Parts must withstand saltwater and UV. Also strong enough for the reasonable stress and impacts:

    a. 4” long stainless ¼ 20 bolt - 2
    b. 4” long stainless ¼ 20 Eye bolt - 1
    c. stainless ¼ 20 nuts - 4
    d. stainless ¼ 20 locking nuts (nylon insert) - 4
    e. stainless washer for the above bolts - 2
    f. 6.6” long nylon Cleat - 2 (from Wal-Mart under $4.00)

    Others:
    1. Stainless snap link - 1
    2. 100’ of 1/8” nylon braided line – you may connect two 48’ lines

    Total cost: under $25.00
    Total Working Time: 20 Minutes

    * I got the parts from Wal-Mart, Boater’s World and Lowes

    Instructions:

    Assembling Reel and Lines:


    1. Enlarge the pre-drilled holes "A" and "B" on both cleats by using the drill
    2. Drill a hole in the center of one of cleats. This hole must be large enough so that the cleats can spin freely.
    3. Assemble the cleats as shown on the picture.
    4. Make sure that the end of the eye bolt pass through “C” hole.
    5. Make sure that the eye bolt is not assembled too tight. The cleats must spin freely.
    6. Tie the anchor line and the line to the snap link by using bowline.
    7. Connect the snap link to kayak.

    Other Tips:

    1. As seen on the pictures, I use the typical cleat hitch knot. To be sure I make two cleat hitch knots

    Cleat Hitch Knot:



    2. I usually have a double Cleat Knot on 60’ (from the anchor) of the line. If I am in 25’-35’ of water, I simply drop the anchor. I don’t have to make the knots. Make sure that the snap link is connected to the kayak.

    3. I took Ictalurus’s advice on how to tie the anchor line to a grappling anchor. I tested zip ties to connect the anchor line to the top hole of the anchor. The 6"-7" zip ties were too weak to use. 9" zip tie - Depending on the location of the hole of the zip tie, the 9” zip ties broke at a wide range of loads, 7 LB – 50 LB plus. So I use 20 LB test mono. I simply put the 20 LB test mono through both holes (top anchor hole and knot of line). I put the ends of the mono line together and make a simple loop knot. Now the mono line breaks at about 35 LB load consistently.

  2. Remove Advertisements
    TidalFish.com
    Advertisements
     

  3. #2
    Dedicated TF Poster - Not a Tidal Fish Subscriber
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    524

    Default

    pretty cool

  4. #3
    Plays by sense of smell. ictalurus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    1,529

    Default

    I like the clip on the end. I'll have to do something like that with my spool.
    Anadromous fish come and go, but catfish stay forever.

    Yellow Hobie Revolution
    Yellow Tarpon 120

  5. #4
    Average TF Poster - Not a Tidal Fish Subscriber
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    71

    Default

    I found something really cheap. I took an old pool noodle and cut about 8 inches or so off. I was able to run the first part of the line through the middle of the noodle tied a loop (end of trailing line ties on a clamp). If you clip it to the kayak you can throw the whole thing overboard. The achor will unravel and the damn thing floats. When I get home I will post a picture.

  6. #5
    Loyal TF Poster - Not a Tidal Fish Subscriber
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    1,357

    Default

    DamselFish,
    Using pool noodle is a good idea. I carry pool noodle in my suv allways. But never saw the anchor spool from it. I can picture that line comes off nicely when you throw the whole thing. I still can't picture how to adjust the line length. I thought about putting a PVC pipe through the noodle (similar to the crab pot buoy).

  7. #6
    Average TF Poster - Not a Tidal Fish Subscriber
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    71

    Default

    My cheap noodle anchor reel. I just use that overhand knot that was posted by someone to adjust the length of anchor line out. see picture. Right now I avoided adding hardware to my kayak for anchor tolley by connecting downrigging line to my kayak. It works for now.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

Name:	anchor.jpg 
Views:	269 
Size:	34.5 KB 
ID:	10839   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	tolley.jpg 
Views:	196 
Size:	14.0 KB 
ID:	10840  

  8. #7
    Loyal TF Poster - Not a Tidal Fish Subscriber
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    1,357

    Default

    Damselfish,
    Now I see it. One more question. How do you secure the line on the noodle spool? Just put it behind the seat?

    Thanks.
    Joe

  9. #8
    Average TF Poster - Not a Tidal Fish Subscriber
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    71

    Default

    I ran the end of the line through the middle of the noodle and tied it as one big loop but left a long trailing piece where I tied the end clip. The rest of the line just wraps around the noodle and the underlying loop. You can store it anywhere but just clip it somewhere.

  10. #9
    Loyal TF Poster - Not a Tidal Fish Subscriber
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    1,357

    Default

    Got it.
    Cheap but effective.

    Joe

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Link to Us   Subscription Information   Advertise   Terms of Service   Privacy Policy   Resources   Contact Us   About Us

©2012 TidalFish.com. All Rights Reserved.