"50 MILLION GALLON SEWAGE SPILL" fines seam ass backward - Page 3
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  1. #21
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    Besides the sewage plants being in need of updated equipment, people are eating way too much. Everyone needs to eat 1 1/2 meals a day total (small portions also)and the sh*t problem will be cut on half. LOL

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  3. #22

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    Not only that but a high fiber and more vegetarian/roughage diet.
    A fee should be attached to all that whole grain and veggie-this and that foo-foo food being pushed by do gooders and the proceeds go towards waste treatment upgrades. The heck with a flush tax...that's just the end result; hit the big pockets on top of the food chain where the digestive tract starts.
    aka Chesapeakecarper 16 ft Xpress jon "Fatal Pressure" and Carolina Skiff 17 DLX outta Centreville and Rolph's Wharf at Green Can #35 on the Chester River

  4. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by Capt. Rubber Hooks View Post
    This issue has infuriated me for years. Sewage leaks in the Patapsco are treated so dismissively by the media as well as the state and county regulators that I cannot forsee a solution anywhere on the horizon. I often wonder if there would be public outrage if the shores of the Patapsco were more residential in nature. Politicians really have no incentive to get involved in this issue because most of the Patapsco flows through State Park and industrial land. If the Patapsco were one of the more over-developed, residential tributaries around Annapolis there would be tax paying constituents raising hell and bringing attention to the issue. As it stands, big industry on the river will not push for change as they live in a glass house with respect to the toll that they also exact upon the river. If the state parks folks have been trying to do anything about this I certainly haven't heard about it. Blue Plains facility on the Potomac is a shining example of what needs to happen to reverse this trend. Taking it one step further, Baltimore City should try to fix their arcane, failing water treatment infastructure instead of wasting resources repaving streets for a stupid Indy car race.
    This stuff has been going on for decades, and continues annually...all for lack of a backup power source, common sense and simply giving a damn.

    They used the financial hardship story back then too when we were flush (no pun intended) with $$. I was an activist re this stuff back in the 70's (40 years ago!!!) in high school/college with Save Our Streams on other Baltimore area rivers like the Big and Little Gunpowder. Back then it was maintenance at the Perry Hall pumping station requiring shutting down the pumps and the plan was to divert (purposeful spill) millions of gallons of raw sewage into the Big Gunpowder. I contacted then Congressman Clarence Long and guess what...a solution was found quickly.

    The attitude is likely that Patapsco River is an urban, industrialized, and ugly landfilled crap river to start with, chits been flowing into it for centuries so whats a bit more. Ho hum...another day another 100 million gallons of chit. All in a days work; push a button; throw a lever. To the neighbors, albiet lower middle class +/- this is the way of life so no one complains. If this happened regularly in an upscale area, or where someone gave a damn. the problem would be solved toot-sweet. Like Perry Hall.

    How much $$$ was spent, to MUCH fanfare by the Md/National organizations and agencies, to remove the upriver dams to allow migratory fish passage? I see little sense in replacing a physical upriver barrier with a down river toxic and biological one. Talk about $$ wasted, when migratory fish must pass through a ch*t gauntlet or bypass the feeder river entirely. It simply comes down to one of those WTF moments, where the failings of one small link adversely affect a much larger regional and national chain.
    aka Chesapeakecarper 16 ft Xpress jon "Fatal Pressure" and Carolina Skiff 17 DLX outta Centreville and Rolph's Wharf at Green Can #35 on the Chester River

  5. #24
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    Update :



    Algae bloom follows latest Patapsco sewage spill



    Posted: Wednesday, April 25, 2012 9:33 am
    Algae bloom follows latest Patapsco sewage spill PAMELA WOOD Staff Writer CapitalGazette.com | 0 comments
    First came the sewage, now comes the algae bloom.
    The Patapsco River is seeing a large bloom of prorocentrum minimum algae, likely due to a massive sewage spill one month ago.

    The Department of Natural Resources can't confirm the link yet, but officials said it makes sense that the influx of nutrient-rich sewage is driving the growth of the current algae bloom.
    About 17 millions of untreated sewage flowed into the river per day for several days after a 54-inch pipe burst near the Patapsco Pumping Station in Baltimore County on March 25.
    Last week, a monitoring station in Masonville Cove on the Patapsco started recording a spike in chlorophyll readings, said Mark Trice, who helps run the DNR Eyes on the Bay monitoring program.
    Chlorophyll indicates the presence of algae in the water.
    Tests showed the algae to be prorocentrum minimum, a variety of mahogany tide that can tint the water a reddish-brown color.
    It's not clear how long the algae bloom will last — it depends on the weather and how many nutrients flow into the river and feed the algae, said Cathy Wazniak, a water quality expert with the DNR.
    With so much algae in the water, the dissolved oxygen levels have dropped, meaning there is too little oxygen for fish, crabs and shellfish to live in that area right now.
    The Patapsco algae bloom is one of several examples of earlier-than-usual algae blooms across the Chesapeake Bay this spring.
    For information on algae blooms and water quality, the DNR posts data at www.eyesonthebay.net.
    What could be more mundane than dying of old age or of natural causes when there is death by misadventure to be pursued ? Skip

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