Correct tire pressure on trailer

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  1. #1
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    Default Correct tire pressure on trailer

    How do you guys who trailer their boats know what tire pressure your trailer should be? My trailer tires state that max pressure is 65#, but how much pressure is the correct trailering tire pressure? As an example; My truck tires state that max pressure is 50#. The manufacture of the vehicle recommends max to be 32#. I run them around 35#. What should I do with my trailer tires?



    Notch

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  3. #2
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    Default Correct tire pressure on trailer

    Notch, 35# is way too low psi on your truck tire. If your tires state that it should be 50 psi max than 10-15% below that should be the minimum psi ran, Unless on sand or something... Trailer tires should be ran at manufacturers psi stamped on tire sidewall. NO LOWER.

  4. #3
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    Default Correct tire pressure on trailer

    Fixit- The manufacturer's stamp on the tire is the Maximum psi, not the recommended tire pressure.

    Should I be running at maximum pressure?

  5. #4
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    Default Correct tire pressure on trailer

    IS YOUR TRAILER BOUNCE OFF THE ROAD

    I LIKE TO RUN 40-50 PSI ON TRAILER TIRES
    ON THE TRUCK TIRES THE TIRE MANUFACTOR KNOWS BEST
    FORD HAD THIS PROBLEM A COUPLE OF YEARS AGO
    FORD,CHEVY, DODGE. TOYOTA.NISSAN, ECT. HAS SUGGESTED A TIRE PRESSURE BUT THEY MAKE TRUCKS NOT TIRES

  6. #5
    ragnad
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    Default Correct tire pressure on trailer

    My trailer tires say "maximum load (xxx lbs) at 50 psi" so I keep them at 50 psi. My truck tires say "max pressure 50 psi" but I go with what it says on the drivers' door jamb, which I think is 35 psi.

  7. #6
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    Default Correct tire pressure on trailer

    I read this and I'm just getting back from a trailer place and I ask the guy at the counter. He said that you should put just what the tire says on it. Like mine says 50 so 50 it is.

  8. #7
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    Default Correct tire pressure on trailer

    My trailer tires say #50 max and that is where I keep em.The door decal on my truck say #55 in the front and #80 in the rear.The only time I run #80`s in the rear is when towing or carring a heavy load.[wink]

  9. #8
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    Default Correct tire pressure on trailer

    Agree with most. Have your trailer tires at maximum pressure recommended on the tire. Unless your load is substantially less than what it says on the tire. For example, if the tire says 2360 pounds at 50 PSI, but you're only towing 1000 pounds in total, you don't need full pressure.

    I hope that doesn't confuse things. Just fill it to the max. Remember that when it warms up, "cold" tire pressure is about 25% higher than it is in the cold of winter. Best bet is to check the tire pressure on the day you plan to tow before you get any heat in the tires.

  10. #9
    Rock Star TF Poster - Not a Tidal Fish Subscriber Gitzit 2's Avatar
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    Default Correct tire pressure on trailer

    you are right on, DaveO.
    i spent many years in the tire biz.
    however, i would recommend you run what the tire says, period.

    heat kills tires and low pressure increases heat dramatically. the only thing you will gain by lowering the air pressure in your tires is a little bit of a smoother ride, that's it.

    i wouldn't risk it.

    some people like to lower the pressure in their cars and trucks to get a softer ride. this increases tire wear and reduces the tires performance capabilities, sometime to unsave levels. the side walls loose their stability and greatly increase roll on the rim which will change the handling of the vehicle and increase the likelihood of roll-over. an underinflated tire also looses contact with the road surface in the center of the tread, reducing your contact pattern by as much as 15%. this means less traction and less stopping power!

    make sure you fill your tires and check them when COLD only. if your inflate a hot tire to its max pressure and then run it again the pressure will be way too high!

  11. #10
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    Default Correct tire pressure on trailer

    [Q]fixit originally wrote:
    Notch, 35# is way too low psi on your truck tire. If your tires state that it should be 50 psi max than 10-15% below that should be the minimum psi ran, Unless on sand or something... Trailer tires should be ran at manufacturers psi stamped on tire sidewall. NO LOWER.
    [/Q]I'm with ya' on this one 100%!!Vehicle manufacturers[Engineers] do NOT always know best.They design and test in Controlled conditions,Not real world conditions.

    Also the Tire pressures they reccomend are ALOT for ride comfort,NOT for the best Tire wear.Take the Ford Explorers a while back for instance.Ford blamed the Firestone Tires for blowing out and causing the roll-overs in which alot of people died.Firestone blamed Ford for reccomending TOO LOW of Tire pressure in the Tires,causing overheating and Blow-outs.Firestone was RIGHT!Those same tires on other SUV's with higher Tire pressures did NOT have any problems!Take it for what its worth,BUT in ALL my Vehicles,Trailers included,I run the Maximum that is stated on the Tire.[Mike]

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