View Full Version : rigging a flying gaff



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bl
10-22-2007, 07:58 PM
What is the best way to rig an 8" flying gaff. Do you use 100# mono between the gaff head and the handle? Does that give you enough power to sink the gaff into a big tuna or shark? How much line and what diameter do you recommend? Are there any tricks of the trade? Please add any thoughts that may help a beginner.

Thanks,
Bruce

Darren
10-23-2007, 07:18 AM
I like to have loops at both end of my flyer rope. Loop the head on, so you can take it off later and be able to wash the rope separately as it gets bloody. Also the rope should be no longer than your reach over the transom with the gaff. To much rope allows the fish to swim off building a head of steam and the hook can pull and come flying back.

Put some vaseline or other such lube on the part of the head that goes into the handle, this prevents corrosion from welding the dissimilar metals together and making it a fixed gaff. Also I use mono to go from the hook to the rivet on the handle, but I use 130 pound test. I don't want the head to come free prematurely. Some people use 20-30 lb monel wire. Shark skin is thick, and big tunas have thick gill plates. Trust me the 130 will break when you sink it in a big fish. The rope should be free to come off of the handle, not wrapped around it. I put one wrap of electrical tape around the rope and the handle to keep the line "true" down the handle. That keeps it from fouling around it. I used to use duct tape and believe it or not, the tape usually held after the mono broke.

Another trick for washing ropes. Steal your wifes lingerie bag that she washes her fancy bras and panties in (little mesh sack with zipper). Rinse the lion's share of the blood off on the boat, but when you get home, put the ropes in the lingerie bag and throw them in with your fishing laundry. Works great. Just be sure to get any clumpy or thickened blood off of the ropes first.

bl
10-23-2007, 08:59 AM
Darren,
Do you crimp the 130# mono to the head and then to the rivet on the handle as tight as possible?

Darren
10-23-2007, 11:35 AM
Yep. It is actually easier to do with wire if you have a set of lock wire pliers, you can twist it up nice and tight.

bl
10-23-2007, 06:48 PM
Thanks, I am gearing to be offshore June - July of next year. Any info is great. I have been on offshore charters, however, getting ready to do it myself is a challange.

27 sailfish
10-24-2007, 01:12 PM
I keep the head off the pole.Trust me-with a big fish-you'll have time to put it on :D .

I like to hold the rope tight on the handle and really lean back to "sink" the gaff.You'll feel it bury into the fish.Be sure to keep the point sharp.

Once the flyer is in-be sure to hold onto the handle.I use 15 feet of 5/8'' nylon rope.

On trick is to practice using the gaff.Get used to where you will stand/etc. You can "practice" at the dock-the idea is too be familar with how it works.

Nothing worse then trying a flyer for the first time on a really big,pissed off fish :eek2: .

Wait for your shot and sink it deep :thumbup: . Good luck. Skip

Russ D
01-26-2008, 01:42 PM
Please be sure you know what you are doing with a big mako or thresher. These are seriously powerful fish with lots of nasty teeth. It;s really easy to get hurt gaffing them. I'd advise taking someone with alot of experience with big sharks the first trip out. Or charter a pro mate to ride with you.

rich daiker
01-26-2008, 02:36 PM
I run about 5' of 3/8'' cable to the hook, then 12' of good 5/8'' rope connected with a stainless swivel / clevis....elect tape the rope about mid pole and keep the rope out from under your feet!!!! Flyers and harpoons can get you if your not VERY VERY careful...if getting the blood of your rope is the only problem you have, it was a great day......and keep it sharp

PS....try to gaff any "jumping" type fish past the centerline of the body..1/2 way back to tail...it keeps them out of the boat if they jump while on the rope

kapnD
06-04-2008, 03:01 AM
looks like you have got lots of advice about the fly gaff rigging and use, however gaffing is not the end of the game. A fish that hangs on the fly for a while may become docile, but should be DEAD before you attemp to bring it onto the boat. This is a subject studiously avoided by most sportfishing media and publications, but one that must be addressed. When a big tuna laying on the deck starts "humping", you and your boat are in real danger. The surest way to dispach a big fish is to shoot it in the head, whether you use a bangstick, rifle, handgun, etc. My personal favorite is a single action pistol. It is inherently safe to use, as it must be manually cocked, and will not shoot again unexpectedly. It is easy to aim and shoot with one hand on a rocking boat, and its not necessary to place the muzzle directly on the fish which may provoke it to frenzy again. I have seen several accidents involving bangsticks, from holes in the hands to holes in the boat to broken leaders and busted gaffs. The mallet or bat or whatever you can swing from your particular boats configuration is the old standby, and will work well if applied diligently! Here again, though is potential to damage the boat or the person more than the fish, so choose something that you are comfortable using, and be sure you have it within reach when the time comes. Also for marlin practice throwing a hitch over the bill from either sides of the boat, its surprising how easy it is to fkkk this simple step up! Don't forget to bleed the fish ASAP, and gut it if at all possible. It would be a shame to waste a big fish for a few more pounds at the scale. All that said, Really big fish are becoming more and more rare, so unless you have a definate plan to use or sell the fish, cut the leader if you ever want your grandkids to see one. Tight lines, Don

Russ D
06-04-2008, 04:02 PM
looks like you have got lots of advice about the fly gaff rigging and use, however gaffing is not the end of the game. A fish that hangs on the fly for a while may become docile, but should be DEAD before you attemp to bring it onto the boat. This is a subject studiously avoided by most sportfishing media and publications, but one that must be addressed. When a big tuna laying on the deck starts "humping", you and your boat are in real danger. The surest way to dispach a big fish is to shoot it in the head, whether you use a bangstick, rifle, handgun, etc. My personal favorite is a single action pistol. It is inherently safe to use, as it must be manually cocked, and will not shoot again unexpectedly. It is easy to aim and shoot with one hand on a rocking boat, and its not necessary to place the muzzle directly on the fish which may provoke it to frenzy again. I have seen several accidents involving bangsticks, from holes in the hands to holes in the boat to broken leaders and busted gaffs. The mallet or bat or whatever you can swing from your particular boats configuration is the old standby, and will work well if applied diligently! Here again, though is potential to damage the boat or the person more than the fish, so choose something that you are comfortable using, and be sure you have it within reach when the time comes. Also for marlin practice throwing a hitch over the bill from either sides of the boat, its surprising how easy it is to fkkk this simple step up! Don't forget to bleed the fish ASAP, and gut it if at all possible. It would be a shame to waste a big fish for a few more pounds at the scale. All that said, Really big fish are becoming more and more rare, so unless you have a definate plan to use or sell the fish, cut the leader if you ever want your grandkids to see one. Tight lines, Don

Awesome post dude. Well written and outstanding advice!