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Fiskamon
09-12-2008, 05:18 PM
I started out with a Yashica MAT 134. That's and old paralex view large format camera. I graduated to a Bronica ETRS stsem and shot with that for years. Most all my skydiving photography was done with an Olympus OM and OM10.

I sold all my stuff because what started out as a hobby turned into a real need suppliment my military salary. I did High School reunions, little league and some insurance photography.

In the last 3 years I've picked the hobby up again. I have a Canon Rebel XT and last Friday bought a a Canon 40D. I was asked by a friend to take some photo's of thier wedding. I am a bit rusty but here are some of what I shot. I used a Cokin filter for the effects.

http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47b8d733b3127ccec54d77e97b6c00000040O09QaN2LJu3B7e fCw/cC/f%3D0/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D480/ry%3D320/

http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47b8d733b3127ccec54c0b695b9e00000040O09QaN2LJu3B7e fCw/cC/f%3D0/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D480/ry%3D320/

http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47b8d733b3127ccec54c997c5bc200000040O09QaN2LJu3B7e fCw/cC/f%3D0/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D480/ry%3D320/

fivewt
09-12-2008, 06:30 PM
I have a wide angle lense for an om10 if you are interested

Fiskamon
09-12-2008, 07:14 PM
I have a wide angle lense for an om10 if you are interested

Thanks much for the offer but since I stopped jumping back in 1988, I sold all my Olympus camera's

Capt Frank
09-13-2008, 07:58 AM
Fisk I had a wedding/portrait/coml photo business for 28 years to supplement my State salary. In the old days, late 70s to early 80s weddings were easy to find, eventually the supply of photographers outstripped the demand. By the time digital started making it's way into wedding shooters hands in 2000-2003, most people were scanning photos and the ability to make money on reprints, and find weddings without lots of advertising was low. Most photographers had to modify the way they charged etc. I started shooting with a Mamiya C330 twin lens, and within several years went to the Bronica ETRS. By the mid 90s I sold that system and went to Hasselblads square format, glad I did, as Bronica has now gone out of business. In 2005 sold the Hassys on eBay and went total digital with Nikon D200s, however, by 06 had moved and now am not pursuing weddings due to my locale. Weddings are tough to shoot due to the ultimate demand to get that one time do or die shots, then add the emotions of the Bride/groom and families. Many people dont understand why that experience and equipment needs to be calculated in the charges for the wedding, which range into the thousands. The experts feel that 20% of the wedding costs should be photo/video charges.
What I found as time moved on is that people rarely ever recommend photographers, no matter how great a job you performed and that most people purchase on emotions not quality of job. Some of the worse photographers I knew(and there were plenty), were good sellers and able to close contracts while other great shooters, not a great personality, had more trouble finding work. My only advice, if you decide to do the wedding thing, is to go to the wedding seminars, they're cheap, and they will save you time and money getting into the business. If you're in the Wash DC area just google wedding photo seminars wash DC and they'll pop up. Unfortunately and prolly the best wedding photographer ever passed away last year, down here in Fl, Monty Zucher. I knew him for over 20 years, and was a great source of info, and gave great seminars in the DC area. Get as much experience as you can, nothing will substitute. You will meet photographers in your area at the seminars, just volunteer to work with them and watch the improvement. Always carry lots of equipment for redundancy, remember Murphy's Law. Subscribe to the free mags like studio photography. Got some fishing to do, anytime you have any questions shoot me an email off my website-
Southwest Florida Salt Water Fly Fishing Guide (http://www.saltflyfish.com)

Fiskamon
09-13-2008, 08:08 AM
Fisk I had a wedding/portrait/coml photo business for 28 years to supplement my State salary. In the old days, late 70s to early 80s weddings were easy to find, eventually the supply of photographers outstripped the demand. By the time digital started making it's way into wedding shooters hands in 2000-2003, most people were scanning photos and the ability to make money on reprints, and find weddings without lots of advertising was low. Most photographers had to modify the way they charged etc. I started shooting with a Mamiya C330 twin lens, and within several years went to the Bronica ETRS. By the mid 90s I sold that system and went to Hasselblads square format, glad I did, as Bronica has now gone out of business. In 2005 sold the Hassys on eBay and went total digital with Nikon D200s, however, by 06 had moved and now am not pursuing weddings due to my locale. Weddings are tough to shoot due to the ultimate demand to get that one time do or die shots, then add the emotions of the Bride/groom and families. Many people dont understand why that experience and equipment needs to be calculated in the charges for the wedding, which range into the thousands. The experts feel that 20% of the wedding costs should be photo/video charges.
What I found as time moved on is that people rarely ever recommend photographers, no matter how great a job you performed and that most people purchase on emotions not quality of job. Some of the worse photographers I knew(and there were plenty), were good sellers and able to close contracts while other great shooters, not a great personality, had more trouble finding work. My only advice, if you decide to do the wedding thing, is to go to the wedding seminars, they're cheap, and they will save you time and money getting into the business. If you're in the Wash DC area just google wedding photo seminars wash DC and they'll pop up. Unfortunately and prolly the best wedding photographer ever passed away last year, down here in Fl, Monty Zucher. I knew him for over 20 years, and was a great source of info, and gave great seminars in the DC area. Get as much experience as you can, nothing will substitute. You will meet photographers in your area at the seminars, just volunteer to work with them and watch the improvement. Always carry lots of equipment for redundancy, remember Murphy's Law. Subscribe to the free mags like studio photography. Got some fishing to do, anytime you have any questions shoot me an email off my website-
Southwest Florida Salt Water Fly Fishing Guide (http://www.saltflyfish.com)

I have no intention to turn my hobby into a business again. I did that once and lost all love of the camera because it is one great hustle as well as hassle. Right now I'm just happy enough to strap on my back pack and walk through the woods or look for other photo opportunities.

The best gig I had was High School reunions. Most reunion committies don't want to screw with photo's because they are stuck with paying out the sitting fee, which is uaually around $100.00 just for the photog to show up, and then paying out for thoe photo'd, then the cost of mailing and on top of that, trying to get the folks to pay up. I never charged a sitting fee, I went out and got bonded with a professional license, and then had Pre-paid mailers where I collected the money up front from the high school members. I used to clear around $1,500.00 or more after my overhead was cleared.

Sanity
09-13-2008, 10:02 AM
Good to see your post. Both you and Capt. Frank have been very informative. I remember your contributions to the "Random Images" thread and it's good to see you here. Your experience as a one time "pro" are helpful to those who might be interested in turning to that direction.

It ain't easy and people rarely take into the consideration the time, money and sweat that goes into delivering a "product". I've had over 20 years on the Art Show circuit and I'm sure that we could trade some interesting stories over a beer. I had initially started out in the art field in photography but my early experience led me to go to the sculpture end of things since it seemed to be more rewarding with personal satisfaction and delivery of a "unique" product. It was never, fortunately, my main source of income so I could always keep it in perspective. I did it for me and if someone else liked it....cool.

My photography has been a source of getting "resource" material for my wife's paintings and maintaining an outlet when the carving got a bit tedious. It was a nice break that you could always do with minimal effort and I always pack a camera with me to grab that shot that presents itself when you are out and about.

Good luck and good shooting. It's nice to see your stuff! I've shot couple of weddings for friends who couldn't afford a photographer for their wedding. We had the rules of engagement outlined before hand so they knew what to expect and more importantly what not to expect. It was my "gift" to them.

I always like to be a "lurker" at engagements of that sort, since the "work" detracts from your appreciation of the events.

Fiskamon
09-13-2008, 11:22 AM
Good to see your post. Both you and Capt. Frank have been very informative. I remember your contributions to the "Random Images" thread and it's good to see you here. Your experience as a one time "pro" are helpful to those who might be interested in turning to that direction.

It ain't easy and people rarely take into the consideration the time, money and sweat that goes into delivering a "product". I've had over 20 years on the Art Show circuit and I'm sure that we could trade some interesting stories over a beer. I had initially started out in the art field in photography but my early experience led me to go to the sculpture end of things since it seemed to be more rewarding with personal satisfaction and delivery of a "unique" product. It was never, fortunately, my main source of income so I could always keep it in perspective. I did it for me and if someone else liked it....cool.

My photography has been a source of getting "resource" material for my wife's paintings and maintaining an outlet when the carving got a bit tedious. It was a nice break that you could always do with minimal effort and I always pack a camera with me to grab that shot that presents itself when you are out and about.

Good luck and good shooting. It's nice to see your stuff! I've shot couple of weddings for friends who couldn't afford a photographer for their wedding. We had the rules of engagement outlined before hand so they knew what to expect and more importantly what not to expect. It was my "gift" to them.

I always like to be a "lurker" at engagements of that sort, since the "work" detracts from your appreciation of the events.

As much as I like and enjoy a well composed and expose scenic shot, I have always been partial to the B&W medium. I can't say I'm an Ansil Adams, but I tried like hell to emulate him and his work. Most of the memorable photo's of my children have been shot in the B&W.

I learned along time ago that the sucess in a photo lies in the eye of the photog. An artist can sit for hours, days and even years in front of his canvas to turn out a masterpiece. A photog has but seconds to compose and shoot. Time is the what works against photog's that one little hesitation means the difference in a missed photo or one that wins awards.

I saw a photo contest won with a photo that was shot with an old Brownie Starlight camera. It beat out ones that were shot with the most advanced 35mm SLR's, large and medium format cameras out there. Folks think that the key to a good photo is buying the most expensive equipment that one can buy. Most that do end up shooting on the auto setting most all the time.

I don't know where this hobby will take me, but I do know I won't be doing it for money. I'm sure you will agree that the hardest critic of your work is you. I have had people ask me for photo's I thought were crap.

My problem is getting the time to get out. I have a boat that has been sitting in my back yard for the 3 years that hasn't had the hull wet. I'm about ready to can this job seeing as how we have our first grandchild and I don't intend on missing as much of his life as I did my kids when I was in the service.

Sanity
09-13-2008, 12:33 PM
I have hundreds of pics of my children growing up. Looking back on them, I made a serious omission. I didn't take many pics of my wife. I wish that I had, but as so often happens, we take "us" as being always available and not changing with time. Would that it were so!

We have a few of each other and they are dear to us though the comparisons to the way we were and the way we are is tough.;-)

Fiskamon
09-13-2008, 12:45 PM
Through the years I have taken pictures at every family function I went to. The funny thing is, all those that were saying. "Get that camera out of my face" are the ones that are asking today, do you have any pictures of aunt, uncle, grandma, grandpa, mom and dad etc. that I can get from you.

Back then the practice could get expensive with film and processing fee's. Today, digital allows you to take pictures until you overdose.

Here's one of my grandson I took with my point and shoot

http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47b8d732b3127ccec54e4257433000000040O09QaN2LJu3B7e fCw/cC/f%3D0/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D480/ry%3D320/

Capt Frank
09-13-2008, 04:22 PM
That's a great shot Fisk, nice looking kid dont hurt either. Ansel modified many of his best shots and went to extreme to get what he got.

Sanity I photographed artwork many times. I remember once a lady came up to my home studio with a bracelet made by American Indians. It turns out that the bracelet was one of a kind, made by the Plains Indians, worth hundreds of thousands of dollars. The photographs went to the Smithsonian where the bracelet eventually wound up on display with other Indian artifacts. I also photographed artwork many times in the studio, usually slide film. The studio made the photography easier with multiple lighting and a background system.