Question- Electric Fillet Knives
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  1. #1
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    Default Question- Electric Fillet Knives

    I've always used a regular fillet knife but recently have been thinking about investing in an electric model to make life easier.

    There are so many brands, styles, corded, cordless, etc. I'm interested in opinions from those of you who have either owned one in the past or currently own one.

    Are they worth it and if so which one do you recommend.

    Thanks,

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  3. #2
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    Talking Electric knife

    Joe,
    I use a commercial type electric knife that the wife bought for Turkey & Ham slicing.It strips the Filet off the Skin quick.

    I only use it on fish like Tog,Trout, Small Striper,Sea Bass only.

    Regular manual Filet knife for others like Flounder,Big Striper,Sheephead,Spade,Trigger and much larger fat fish.

    Regards

    BTW,I've used the Mr. Twister type electric knives before but they never held up long that's why I went to the commercials.Never had to replace them but recently bought a new one after 5 years and it's in standby.
    Last edited by Flounderman2001; 04-07-2007 at 09:33 AM.

  4. #3
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    Smile

    I'm on my third Mr. Twister knife in many years. I clean just about anything as long as the skin isn't too soft like on a tog.

    I cleaned a few flounder yesterday and it sure was easier than the hand knife. It just takes a little practice and those fillets will be coming off in no time.

    I've also used it on triggers, spades, stripers, etc..


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  6. #4
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    Default

    Joe , I've used them all. Even the " Electric Fisherman " model ! ( never got the royalties ) First I prefer the corded type . I have a cordless that I use sometimes on the way in from offshore to get a headstart but they don't last very long & aren't powerful. I think the Americal Angler series works the best for me. I use it for all species, even flounder once you get the hang of it. Sea bass , togs , cobia & stripers are a breeze. Remember to wear rubber gloves cuz once they get wet you can get some bleed thru voltage depending on the unit & conditions. Good luck when you can go

  7. #5
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    Default

    I have an American Angler Ultra going on five years now. And it's the sheet! I use it for small fish like schoolie stripers/triggers/togs/seabass and small tiles. I can rip through a limit of seabass in no time. Just knock the sides off/de-skin. I still like to use a regular fillet knife for flounder and sheepies and large fillet knives for larger fish like big rocks and cobes.

    My gear....


  8. #6
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    Default filet knives

    I use electric filet knives for all types of fish. The best all around that I have found is the Rapala sold at Bass Pro,Boaters World, etc. for 39.99 It has a transformer for using in the house, also comes with clips to use on battery, plug with for cig. lighter, and comes with two size blades. What ever you choose, be sure to go with the 12 volt.

  9. #7
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    I bought my father the one made by Browning for Christmas. Its a great tool if you have a mess of fish such as seabass or any other smaller fish that you can cut through easily. I wouldnt use it on flounder because of my obsession with filleting them will little waste, or on bigger fish like large rockfish and cobia because it just makes it harder. I think its a great investment! I think ours was about $40 at bass pro
    Last edited by MattD; 04-07-2007 at 11:07 AM. Reason: N is for knowlege, college kids cant spell

  10. #8
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    Default

    I have an American Angler Ultra that I have had for several years. It does well, and when I was first learning, it was faster than anything else. Now that I have a couple of good fillet knives and a few years of pactice I can do a quicker and cleaner job with a manual knife.

  11. #9

    Default

    I own two -- an American Angler "regular" and an American Angler Ultra. The regular actually works somewhat better for me. The blades for both dull in a season or less, but are cheap enough to replace.

    I have two so that my fishing partner can do his share of the work, too.

    Since croaker is my favorite eating fish, and since I have more than a few landlubber friends who don't get to the Bay but love for me to give them cleaned fillets, and since even a big croaker has an appallingly low meat-to-carcass yield, several times a year I keep croaker by the coolerful.

    Note: Virginia water, so those from MD should not mention that horrible number "20."

    Anyway, cleaning a cooler of croaker *without* an electric knife is a good way to go insane, miserable hour after miserable hour.

    i note that I also own a superb wood-handled unpowered fillet knife made I think in the 70's by J. Marttiini of Finland that is a joy to use if I'm only cleaning a few fish, so my use of electrics is in the interest of time, mainly. Also, I don't normally use my electric on rockfish; they just seem to fillet better using the Canadian method, which isn't practical with an electric.

    Here's a great trick. You can now buy -- for about 20-25 bucks -- a small power inverter for your auto. Bring it and your outdoor extension cord when you go fishing. Now, even at a fishcleaning stand that doesn't have electricity, one person can square away the boat while the other zips through the day's catch.

    We also do a fair amount of overnight catfishing from shore. Same trick lets us do the messy work there rather than at home. (In case you've never tried it, catfish do fillet quite easily, and you can remove the skin same as you would with any other fillet.)

    In short, if you do a lot of fish-keeping, an electric is a great investment. Been using them for about five years now and have never regretted it.

  12. #10
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    Default

    Thanks for all of the feedback guys. I was afraid the responses would be all over the board but since you all seem to like yours I believe I'll have to give one a try.

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