Tuna tips anyone??? - Page 2
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  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kayak fisherman View Post
    Thank ya'll for the feedback.

    I've got a zillion questions about going out there. I know I can't ask 'em all here. My biggest fear is dragging my family and friends all the way out there the first time and not seeing hide nor hair of a fish. My brother and dad are psyched about going (they've never caught a tuna), but they're also the kind of guys who would puss-out right there at the dock and say "hey, why don't we just bottom fish right here for some spots and pinfish?" I just want to have everything planned out and go (take my bro and dad) to the place most likely to be productive.

    I've been following the surface temps on the NOAA website. So, what am I looking for? Do I just plan to fish near the temp break?

    Regarding tackle, I'm planning on getting spreader bar rigs (pre-made) from an online dealer. They have a setup for trolling seven lines for something like $200.

    There's also a store near my house that sells frozen ballyhoo. I don't know how to rig it yet.

    BTW: I'm getting one more reel. I'm leaning toward an Avet Pro EX 50/2. I actually just bought my first Avet about a week ago in the mail from a really nice company (they've emailed me and have answered ALL of my questions about reels). They sent me the wrong reel; I ordered an Avet HX 5/2 WIDE, but they sent me the standard size. I KEPT IT THOUGH, because it's freakin' sweet. They refunded the difference.
    My only tip is, "take someone who knows what they're doing the first couple of times you go out." There's PLENTY of guys with plenty of experience on this site who'll be more than happy to ride along with you & show you the ropes. Being on a charter is one thing, doing it yourself is a whole different ballgame. The pros make it look easy, well, it isn't. It's the little details that make a big difference. Having someone show you how to do things is a lot better than learning the hard way. That's especially true when boating a tuna. Gaffing a fish is not as easy as it looks, & most fish are lost right at the side of the boat. Just my $0.02. I hope it didn't sound like a lecture.

    Anyway, it sounds like you have the right gear. Good luck.

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  3. #12
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    Definitely take someone who knows what they are doing out there. You will incr. your chances of catching significantly and you will learn a lot of info very quick. They will also be able to help get you rigged up to go. I would be happy to help you get rigged up whenever I get some time away from school. Tell us a little about your ride.

  4. #13
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    Echo the other posts. Invite someone with experience who is willing to show you how the basics are done. The help is gold.
    Monarch
    32 Topaz
    Ocean City, MD
    Need the world's greatest grill? www.grillery.com

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  6. #14
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    1. get a couple of 50's to start with either penn or shimano stay away from the okumas .

    2. keep it simple pull a couple of seawitchs , ceder plug chains and a bird green machine down the center wwb . add to your spread as you see what works for you not what some salesman at a tackleshop tells you to use .

    3. Ho on a few rigs and see how things are done , I have learned something from everyone I have fished with over the years . then get someone to go on your rig with you that can show you how to fish your boat correctly .

    4. learn how to rig a bally to make it swim correctly . it will take some trial and error to get it right . I would get a pack or two of old bait from a shop to play with if you mess them up so what . toss it out and try again .

    5. most of all have fun and meet new people . don't sweat the small stuff you will learn with time .

    Kevin

  7. #15
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    I used 4 penn 50's and 2 tld 25 reels last year , my first. there is a lot to learn and so much fun learnin.
    the tld25's work great for smaller tuna, wahoo and white marlin.

    Bill

  8. #16
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    There are a lot of great fisherman on this board and I'm sure you can pick up more information than you can decipher on short notice!

    You've fished on charters so I would guess you've watched what they do...but for sure, go out with someone who has a good system and ask questions. Then have them or someone like them go on your boat and see how you can develop a simple spread that will work. You can easily over complicate this kind of fishing and try to do more than you or your crew can manage effectively.

    So in short, I agree that you should keep it simple and learn as much of the basics COLD as you can...you'll be able to see what works for you and what you prefer.

    Lastly, enjoy yourself. It's not a contest...it's an adventure so soak it all in and learn to watch the water and note the conditions that produce bites...the smallest changes or signs can make your day.

    Glenn

  9. #17
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    Alrighty.

    Keep that good advice comin'. I've got my bro and dad to help. We've all caught and gaffed lots of King Mackerel, amberjack (tried to feed it to the cats), sharks, etc. Also, I'm lucky. My wife's uncle is a young guy who is a an ex-waterman. He's dying to go.

    I can't wait. Rigging and trolling is gonna be fun stuff. I'll let you guys know whenever I go.

    Someone asked me to turn on "PM". Ok, once I figure out what it means. (Private message?)

    I'm getting one more reel. I think I've settled on the Avet Pro 50 or a Penn 50. I've never used an Avet, but there's something about them that's just freakin' sweet.

    I just made a rod-n-reel rack last Sunday afternoon. It was about $9 in parts and a thousand in labor.
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  10. #18
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    BTW, I'm still looking for a name for my boat. I'm not particularly bent on having a boat name. I guess it would just be less embarassing to give the boat name instead of my real name on the VHF when I have to call Sea Tow or the Coast Guard. Just Kidding.

    My brother suggested a few names:
    "Hung" (my favorite, but wife says no)
    "Spot Remover"
    "SS Gas Tank" (which it basically is)
    "Reel World"
    "Load of Salty Seamen" (that's just funny)

  11. #19
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    I'm farily new to being a captain on my own offshore trips as well. Here are a list of some things I would not consider leaving the dock without:

    Knowledge of another boat going and fishing in same general vicinity. If there isn't another boat going were your going, it isn't a good idea to go there yourself until you get familiar with the fishing grounds. Try and find a buddy boat.
    2 VHF radios
    Backup GPS maybe handheld.
    Probably the single most important thing is learning how to rig ballyhoo. Buy 2 or 3 packs of the cheapest you can find, a case of beer, and search out someone who's been in the game for a while. I've found that there are alot of people who are willing to share their knowledge. Much much easier to learn this on land, as it is not as simple as some make it look.
    2 gaffs
    An epirb if you can afford it. They are also available to rent.
    Let someone in your family or a friend know where your going and when you expect to be in off the water and call them when you get in.
    As far as baits and rigging, really kinda of a trial and error thing. Try and find out exactly what others are catching them with and duplicate it.

    Be realistic, don't get discouraged if the charter boats are slamming em and your not. They do this for a living, they are just as much professionals at what they do as a football or baseball player. Your not liklely to catch 20 tuna just because they did.

    I'm sure there are plenty of other things and more will chime in. There is no substitute for experience.

  12. #20
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    Hey Kayak----The use of wide reels(penn 50's,shimanos,etc.) is WIDELY overrated.Those narrower reels(penn 50's,AVET H/X!!,etc.) make standup fishing sweet.Wide reels have much side-to-side wobble from the torque you generate with the handle cranking on fish.Narrow reels are not so bad in this way.I recomend that avet to be your best bet for y-fins,and it'll handle most b-fins,too.The wide 50's will be heavy for 90%+ of your fishing,stealing fun and adding work to your day at sea.PLUS,the avets work nicely for tasty bottom dwellers,too,reducing the overall ratio of work-to-fishing time.Heavy reels are not usually the best option if you fish from a small boat--the charters need em because they've gotta chunk some greenhorn in the chair and constantly remind them to keep cranking till the fish is in.Also,be aware that offshore is not for everybody---I have learned to limit my guests to those I am pretty sure will actually have a good time.The ones who'll hate it will have NO IDEA until you find yourself at the sea bouy,and they are weighing heavily on your concience(should I take uncle bob and aunt jane back,or let em suffer because I just spent weeks planning this trip and put in 100 gallons of fuel?)Learn the game before you start hauling greenhorns!!

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