Taking paint off of fiberglass
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  1. #1
    Dedicated TF Poster - Not a Tidal Fish Subscriber
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    Default Taking paint off of fiberglass

    I have a friend that purchased a fiberglass skiff. The previous owner had painted the inside. The paint is in pretty bad shape and has started flaking in spots.

    Has any one was a sand blaster and in place of sand used pecan shells or other material. Is specialized equipment used? Is there a place in the Baltimore area where you can rent the equipment?

    As an alternative, is there a shop that provides this service, and what would you expect to pay to remove the paint on a 17' skiff.

    Thanks!!!

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  3. #2
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    Soda blasting will remove it.

    not sure of the price but it shouldn't be terrible for a 17 foot boat.

  4. #3

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    If it was flaking, you should be able to sand it off or even power wash it. obviously, it isn't on there too good. My first attempt would be the power washer. good luck.

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  6. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by dwkoller View Post
    I have a friend that purchased a fiberglass skiff. The previous owner had painted the inside. The paint is in pretty bad shape and has started flaking in spots.

    Has any one was a sand blaster and in place of sand used pecan shells or other material. Is specialized equipment used? Is there a place in the Baltimore area where you can rent the equipment?

    As an alternative, is there a shop that provides this service, and what would you expect to pay to remove the paint on a 17' skiff.

    Thanks!!!
    I work for Epic Doors which manufactures high-performance fiberglass entry doors. We evaluated several paint suppliers including TruCoat 623, Sherwin Williams Polane 2K Acrylic, and Aquasurtech D200.

    We were looking for an environmentally friendly, single component water based paint that was super durable, had great adhesion and laid down smooth.

    Based upon our evaluation we selected TruCoat 623. It was much more environmentally friendly than Polane 2K and is a single component and TruCoat had better adhesion than D200 and was priced better.

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