Changes in fish migration patterns--Ches Bay flounder fishing may never recover
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  1. #1
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    Default Changes in fish migration patterns--Ches Bay flounder fishing may never recover

    http://www.wsj.com/articles/changing...try-1462982278


    Wall Street Journal

    "Changing Migration Patterns Upend East Coast Fishing Industry

    Commercial fisheries on the eastern seaboard turn to new practices and hope for regulatory changes

    By Heather Haddon


    Summer flounder that once amassed in North Carolina have gradually shifted about 140 miles to New Jersey—one facet of the northward migration of fish species that is upending traditional fishing patterns.

    The move north has sparked debate among regulators over how to respond to changing natural resources that could affect commercial fisheries across the eastern seaboard....."

    article continues at link above

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    If North and South Carolina's saltwater fishing shifts north to MD, I think that would be pretty good!
    Where do you think we are seeing evidence in the Bay of this northward shift in migration patterns?
    Winter rockfish hanging off Jersey instead of VA Beach and Bay prior to coming up to spawn in March?
    # of cobia in Bay in summer?
    Speckled trout (until that big winter kill) and redfish?
    Resident rockfish abandoning the lower/mid Bay in summer in favor of the upper Bay?
    Volume of cow-nose rays?

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    Quote Originally Posted by rgardn2 View Post
    If North and South Carolina's saltwater fishing shifts north to MD, I think that would be pretty good!
    Where do you think we are seeing evidence in the Bay of this northward shift in migration patterns?
    Winter rockfish hanging off Jersey instead of VA Beach and Bay prior to coming up to spawn in March?
    # of cobia in Bay in summer?
    Speckled trout (until that big winter kill) and redfish?
    Resident rockfish abandoning the lower/mid Bay in summer in favor of the upper Bay?
    Volume of cow-nose rays?
    Some examples in MD include very few flounder in recent years, good pops of reds and specks before the couple of cold winters in 2014 and 2015, and although only there are only a few reports there have been some cobia in MD waters as far as the Bay Bridge.

    I agree we may see lots more cool southern species in MD waters.

    We could see more sharks like bulls that may possibly prey on the rays--if there is prey available the predators follow.

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    A friend pointed out to me a few yrs ago (5?) , that he noted increase in bull shark near Potomac.

    Flounder and other species are going to follow the forage. As the health of Chesapeake bay drops, so does the amount of fish returning. The damage being done to the bay- by the menhaden reduction fleet has to be stopped.
    Last edited by HeyCharlie; 05-25-2016 at 06:10 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by HeyCharlie View Post
    A friend pointed out to me a few yrs ago (5?) , that he noted increase in bull shark near Potomac.

    Flounder and other species are going to follow the forage. As the health of Chesapeake bay drops, so does the amount of fish returning. The damage being done to the bay- by the menhaden reduction fleet has to be stopped.
    b. But how do we do it

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    It could have been that more cobia showed up in Maryland's portion of the Chesapeake waters last year because Virginia reduced the limit of cobia to 2 fish per boat instead of 1pp. or 6 per boat and more were able to make it up the Bay? Or you could just call it a coincident but we haven't had any Cobia to speak of for many years. If Omega were outlawed in Virginia I have a funny feeling we would coincidently have the big schools of menhaden up the Bay like we once had and other game fish would follow also. Coincidently or cyclic of course, no scientific proof.
    Fishing can be anything you want it to be

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    BTW, I often hear that as wt temps continue to rise the migration changes..
    IT is when know that menhaden are filter feeders If these voracious filters are being removed the water is darker... darker water= increased temp!
    and more red & or brown tides.= killing more fish and much greater potential of harming people.
    its not coal causing temp changes in bay-- its Omega!

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    Charlie many scientists are measuring and documenting fish distributional shifts caused by warming waters (warming based on empirical evidence--data measurements) across the the entire US East Coast from Fl to Maine; it is not a Ches Bay thing and it is not a partisan political thing--its SCIENCE.

    Of course some may disagree and some may think the Earth is flat.

    http://www.fis.com/fis/worldnews/wor...ay=26&id=93917

    Cod moves northwards in search of cooler waters

    Click on the flag for more information about United States UNITED STATES
    Tuesday, September 26, 2017, 01:30 (GMT + 9)

    A new study has found that climate change is causing many fish to migrate to new territory as in the case of cod, which are leaving New England waters for cooler water further north.

    According to the researchers carrying out the study this will not only impact US fisheries but it will affect the cod’s prey. For instance, fish like herring and sand lance, common prey species for cod, are not as sensitive to temperature and so are not moving north along with their traditional predator.

    Rebecca Selden, a postdoctoral researcher at Rutgers University and lead author of the paper, says that this will cause some ecological shuffling.

    Free from the pressures of predation, the populations of these fish may explode. But warmer waters may also allow other predators to take the cod’s place. Spiny dogfish, another major predator off the east of the US, prefers warmer waters, and their populations will likely expand to take cod’s place.

    Species interactions, even between a predator and prey, are complex. They are determined by size, metabolism, reproduction rate and competition. So while Selden notes that spiny dogfish will likely be able to ameliorate some of the effects that come from the loss of cod, climate change is altering how species interact all over the world, and not all of them can rely on such ecological buffers.

    The impact on people and coastal economies may be severe as well – Massachusetts probably won’t hang up a giant spiny dogfish in its state house anytime soon.

    The study results were published in the journal Global Change Biology

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