Good Information Mycobacterious in Striped Bass

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  1. #1
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    Default Mycobacterious in Striped Bass

    In this months issue of Bay Journal, there is an article about Myco in Striped Bass. Myco has been around for 22 years in the Chesapeake. When it was first discovered, it was found in 10% of the Striped Bass. Now , it is found in 80-90% of Striped Bass over 5 years old. It weakens the fish and many are believed to die, one at a time, here an there and not noticeable like in a fish kill . There is no present cure and warm water stress makes them weak and unable to chase down prey, especially in summer . The new 1 fish restriction may help but may not bring back the Striped Bass population like it once was. Maybe in the near future, catfish may be the king of the Chesapeake and perhaps snakeheads will replace tidewater Bass. Nature's way is that only the most adaptable survive.
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    I was expecting and willing to accept a moratorium in the future, but seems they want to kick it down the road. who knows maybe it will work!

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    Wasn't it a theory that the lesser amount of menhaden in the rockfish diet helped contribute to it'a inability to fight off diseases?

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    The good news is that we were having this same discussion 5-10 years ago, predicting total collapse of the stock as a result. Fortunately, that hasn't happened yet.

    On the other hand, just like with oysters overcoming MSX and dermo, the key is to let those mature fish who have developed disease tolerance/immunity to breed as many times as possible so that those genes are passed along and eventually become predominant. A problem with sport fishing, particularly open water trolling and jigging, is that we probably catch the healthiest, most disease resistant fish.

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    Not only that , BUT every fisherman releases the fish with obvious lesions to keep healthier 'Looking" fish . Just because a fish looks clean, doesn't mean it doesn't have mico. The real test is a test in the spleen. The good news for striped bass is that mico is only specific to the Chesapeake Bay. Maybe malnurishment is a big part of the problem ?
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    Capt Nick,
    I read your statement “Maybe in the near future, catfish may be the king of the Chesapeake and perhaps snakeheads will replace tidewater Bass. Nature's way is that only the most adaptable survive.” Those two species tolerate poorer quality water and lower oxygen levels than most fish species. Maintaining or improving water quality and habitats made be tough to accomplish in todays ever expanding human population and civilization on natural environments. But it is possible if it becomes valued in our society. That is a tougher challenge than changing any fishing regulation. But possible. It starts with us and our children. ACG

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    I agree but I don't think I will ever happen. More people, more building, more pollution. I think it's a one step forward and two steps backwards proposition.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Capt.Nick View Post
    I agree but I don't think I will ever happen. More people, more building, more pollution. I think it's a one step forward and two steps backwards proposition.
    I'm more of an optimist. Look at clean air, for example. The air in this country, and particularly in the mid-Atlantic and Northeast, is MUCH cleaner today than it's been in 50-years -- possibly cleaner than since the 1800s. That was a result of our nation's unique combination of strict environmental regulations and robust, capitalist fueled innovation. We're seeing the same thing happen with mercury pollution from coal. Despite an administration determined to prop up coal, it's fading fast thanks to a combination of regulatory incentives and capitalist innovation. Natural gas and now even wind and solar are cheaper and more efficient on their own, without subsidies.

    As for population, the U.S. is probably starting to lose population. Individual states have been trying to cook the books on population for a while, since anything other than gain is seen as some sort of failure. But the U.S. birth rate has been below replacement level since 1971 and the immigration that fueled all of our net gain since then has fallen significantly since 2007. As global economies become more modern and fertility rates tumble worldwide, there's a good chance the world hits peak population in our lifetime. Our grandkids may know a world with a third fewer people than it has today.

    None of this is to suggest we don't have real, significant, immediate hurdles, or that things might not get worse in some respects before they get better. But aside from being unhelpful in solving anything, the doom and gloom scenario is not guaranteed. There are many objective reasons to be optimistic.

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    The population of the us in 2015 was 325 million with a steady incline since 1960 from 200 million and still going up. Look it up .
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    Quote Originally Posted by Capt.Nick View Post
    The population of the us in 2015 was 325 million with a steady incline since 1960 from 200 million and still going up. Look it up .
    Nobody suggested that the population hasn't increased. But the rate of increase has tailed off over the past two decades and the fertility rate is at an historic low. It's not been steady. The population has grown through immigration and through the momentum of the baby boom, but both of those forces are petering out now:

    https://www.brookings.edu/blog/the-a...ic-stagnation/

    That same has been true in Europe, Russia and Japan for a while now. It's even starting to happen in much of southeast Asia and Africa.

    P.S.: Not sure the link is working. The article I posted (one of many) is from The Brookings Institute, December 2018: "US population growth hits 80-year low, capping off a year of demographic stagnation"

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