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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm not complaining - luckily I have the tools and good advice to do the job myself.

Unknown to me until an engine alarm sounded - on my Yamaha 200Hp HPDI's - the remote tank has an in line oil filter. It is there to protect the oil pump. This pump sends oil up to the tank under the cowling - from there it is fed by gravity. My filters are 10 years old - way past change time.

The filter is about one inch long - 1/2 diameter. Nothing special - just pull old one off - push new one on. Being 100% sure to follow the flow arrow.



Now with twin engines - it is common sense to always replace parts / filters on both. In this case - be stupid not too , considering where the filter is and how involved it is to get to.

On my Grady White - the two 3 gallon remote tanks are mounted on port side stern - under the live well. No big deal - it slips into a cut out.

Have to remove the spring that holds the lid so I could access all the screws. Easy enough.

The live well over flow needs to be unscrewed - lifting the live well about two inches. The drain is different story - have to get at that from bottom.

There is a panel but toe rail needs to come off so the panel can slide free. Held in place by about 12 screws - 11 came out easy but # 12 had a broken screw driver tip in it. Guess when it was repowered back in 2005.

Not a huge deal - luckily I have easy outs.

Now that panel was out - unscrewed clamp on drain and lifted live well free.

There were the two remote tanks but I could not see filter ???????

Now it gets good. The tanks are set into U shape tray brackets - similar to battery tray. Had to unscrew the hold down - then lift it free. Thankfully it is SS and not a plated bolt. Front tank needed to be removed - to access rear tank and filter.

Had to unscrew the fill hoses - put a cap over the oil tanks ( just in case ). The filter change literally took one minute each. Cut wire tie off one hose - remove. Push new filter onto this hose - double checking flow arrow and it matching old one. Repeat on other hose and put rear tank back in place.

Reconnect fill hose - double check everything - same for front tank.

I checked oil was pumping by taking off fill hose under cowling and turning key on. Yamaha has a toggle switch - this runs the oil pump. Took a few seconds but nice flow of oil :thumbup:.

Wiped down the area around tanks - never can get under here from bilge. Made sure hoses were tight - no tools left . Everything went back smoothly.

If you own a boat - you fully understand a 5 minute job taking three hours and why repairs can be so expensive. If you do not own a boat - this gives you an idea of what can be involved.

Done by marine mechanics - likely a $ 250.00 to $ 350.00 job. Parts ( my cost ) were $30.00.

If you are running two strokes - might be wise to see if you have these filters. No set time / usage to change them - most advised only if alarm sounds.
 

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After having spent countless hours contorting myself into tight spaces, working by feel and busting my knuckles while preforming maintenance and repairs, I no longer complain about the labor prices charged by marine mechanics.

It always helps to walk a mile in another mans shoes before you criticize him.
 

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Damn Skip when I said it was easy I guess I wasn't taking into account that a live well would be mounted over top of oil tanks. Kinda sounds like a poor design by Grady White. What would happen if caps on tanks were left off by mistake and live well developed a leak? Kinda like running a water line through a electrical room!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
On my boat - the oil tanks fill from the transom - through hoses about 2 feet long. Same set up as a fuel tank. The hoses go to the oil tanks - the connection is a upside down female that threads onto a raised molded male fitting - no way for water to enter (unless bilge filled up past the floor ).

The tank bracket is designed to protect the oil pump - but in gets in the way of the filter. Filter needs to be before the pump to protect it. Moving both would be tough.

I've owned this boat since 1997 - my complaint list is very short. Fairly well thought out - as far as getting to things. They used PVC tubes to make running wires simple. Lots of access plates / panels to get to just about everywhere you need to. Hose clamps are positioned in a way you can tighten / loosen them.

I've seen many boats where clamps are " backwards " - so simple a thing to think ahead about - but often done wrong.

No way I could change these filters on the water - but I do carry a one gallon jug of OB oil - and small funnel. I can add oil directly to tank under cowling to get home - if pump or filters clog.
 

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Nice Work, Skip!

On my HPDI, I consider that filter one of the "ain't broke, don't fixer's". I take extra care with my oil fill procedures to ensure no debris gets in there.

In my 12 years with this HPDI, I'm beginning to think it is the best two stroke ever made. Maintenance consists of:

The two fuel filters get changed every other year, and the water separator every year.
Impeller every two years
I clean the O2 sensor every three years.
LU oil every fall (that is the only thing I do to winterize + start it up every 6 weeks.)
I've done plugs maybe every 300 hours.

Ringfree and E10 keep the fuel system spiffy.

This motor has never been to the shop and delivers 4.5 mpg at cruise in my 21 Parker....
 

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I did the same job on my 200 OX66 a few years ago. My remote tank is located in the center console.

Made the mistake of first removing the tank to take out the filter to check to see if I could just clean it. (you can't, its sealed). So off to the parts store to get the part. Left the tank laying on its side so the oil wouldn't leak out of the drain hole.

Came back the next day to finish...

The oil (about a gallon) had leaked out of the vent hole in the top of the tank.... Came back to a gallon of oil all over the cockpit/console, etc...

Looked pretty funny seeing a blue/green yamalube all over the deck...

Oh well...
 

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I did this a couple of months ago,mine had a crack in it and was leaking oil for quite some time.I noticed mine when I decided to get ready to put it back in service after 2 years of sitting.I did not have a problem replacing the filter but one hell of a mess in the bilge.I used a couple of gallons of grease lightning to get rid of the oil in the bilge.
 

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All very interesting info. Looked in the shop manual for our 1989 Yam 200 2-stroke. No mention of an oil filter in the table of contents, nor anything mentioned about maintenance of such in the oil injection section. HOWEVER, there is a picture in the illustrations for that section which clearly shows an item that is identical to the filter in your photo Skip. Going to take a peek under the cowling first chance I get. Might help make this classic last another 26 years!!

Correction - the "identical" filter picture I viewed was on a website parts list, NOT in my shop manual, and it was called a "strainer". A closer look at the pictures in the oil injection section of the shop manual show the under cowling fuel filter, which I service quite regularly. Still, I need to look under cowling for anything that resembles an "oil filter"?
 

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I did the same job on my 200 OX66 a few years ago. My remote tank is located in the center console.

Made the mistake of first removing the tank to take out the filter to check to see if I could just clean it. (you can't, its sealed). So off to the parts store to get the part. Left the tank laying on its side so the oil wouldn't leak out of the drain hole.

Came back the next day to finish...

The oil (about a gallon) had leaked out of the vent hole in the top of the tank.... Came back to a gallon of oil all over the cockpit/console, etc...

Looked pretty funny seeing a blue/green yamalube all over the deck...

Oh well...
They can be cleaned and used in the event of a emergency or reused if you have the time. Simply allow them to soak for a hour or so in a quality degreaser such as super clean or spray nine. Then blow them out with compressed air and allow to dry for another hour or so and they will be like brand new. The first time it happened to me I got the oil alarm at the dock before departing on a trip, cleaned them up and off I went. I was able to finish off the rest of the season with them before replacing. When I pulled them to replace they were still like brand new. Now each year that I put new water pump impellers in I drain down the oil tanks and thourly clean them then refill. The filter got dirty from something in the tank to begin with don't ya think! God forbid something would make it past this filter although it would be almost impossible given its mesh size! I'm just anal!
 
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