Tidal Fish Forum banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My Dad recently gave me his '87 GW Tournament '19. I have recently discovered that the brass drain tubes in the motor well have failed and allowed water to get into the marine plywood in the transom. There is no flex in the transom yet but I assume it is just a matter of time before it starts to let go. The boat was re - powered in '99 and the motor has low hours on it. I have also recently replaced the fuel tank. My Dad took very good care of the boat and other than the transom seems to be in good condition (although it was moored each season before he past it along to me). I am wondereing whether the boat is worth repairing. I would guess a new transom is $3K or so.

Any advice welcomed.

Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,024 Posts
Grady is a good boat. You cannot get one like the one descibed in good running condition for the price a of a transom repair. Me? If I wnated a good boat that will be fine in the bay and near coastal waters (within about five miles of the beach), I'd repair it.

After all, you know the condition of everything on there which is more than you'll know about anything yu replace it with........... could get someone else's major problems.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,806 Posts
Grady's are good boats, and a new transom is cheap compared to a new boat. My 88 Grady Seafarer had a soggy but solid transom when I bought her. The kicker bracket had pulled out and water saturated the transom. I pulled all fasterners off one winter and let it dry, then re-bedded everything.

Note that my transom is made out of 3 layers of 3/4" plywood, and only the center layer of ply is actually rotted. Both the inner and outer layers are fine. So this winter I'll be saturating the center void with epoxy (like Git Rot) by drilling holes from the bilge thru the inner layer of ply, then pumping epoxy resin in the holes from the bottom up. I'll drill holes approx 8-12" apart all over the inner transome, then fill them starting from the bottom, allowing it to dry betw applications as I work my way to the uper holes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,024 Posts
uncljohn,

Before you use GitRot call BOATLIFE (the manufacturer) and talk with them. GitRot will not cure in a wet environment. However, they have a product called Wet Wood Epoxy that will cure in wet wood.

I used it back some years ago on a transom and it seemed to do the job I needed done. I had some water damage in the port side of the transom and I applied this product following the directions and it appeared to work well.

BOATLIFE told me not to use their GitRot and to use this other product. So, I would look them up on the web and call them. From what they told me, you may be sorry if you use the GitRot.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,806 Posts
sandtiger-

My transom is dry now, so I don't need to worry about it being a wet environment. I was really just tossing out the brand name. I have a friend who is a boat builder who's advised me to use generic West Systems slow-cure epoxy & hardener, first injecting w/ straight epoxy/hardener to allow saturation of the wood, then injecting some of the same w/ cabasil filler for strength to fill the void in between ply.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top