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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Would like to talk with someone who fishes back bays with regularity, especially behind AI and south. THANKS
 

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Since I live in Salisbury , I fish OC and points south a couple times a week . I usually don't fish further south than the Verazzano Bridge but stay in the area between Frontier Town and the inlet .I do however , trailer down to Wachapreague , Quinby , Oyster , etc. What do you want to know ? Turn on your PM:thumbup:
 

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I would be interested to know if anyone has been catching any flatties out of Quinby.......or is Wachapreague the place to be right now?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Guys, thanks for all your replies...Jeepthing, haven't been on Stripersonline recently. how ya been?

I'm interested in all the back bays have to offer, gator trout, doormat flatties, reds, speckleds, and the rare late summer tarpon.:yes: .....I figure now into late spring/early summer is the time to target these quickly warming waters. Anyway, don't wanna yap to much.....pm's will be sent :)
 

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Flounder are everywhere right now, but we need some better weather for them to bite. Fish have been at Quimby / Wach since mid march. I've caught fish in ***** Bay already this year.
 

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Yakable ...

I am interested in this as well...

I have been out around the bridge a few times on the kayak, but have never been able to catch anything. I've looked at depth charts of the area and have not been able to find any significant holes. What are you fellas catching?

But fish or no, it is one of my favorite areas to paddle and birdwatch. And the sunsets ... priceless :)
 

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I could tell you but then I would have to kill you....sand bar along the west side straight off the north point of AI, find it and then drift it. Though that pretty much sums up the entire back bay
 

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What's up H20boss? I like the looks of the back bays back there too. But is the only inlet for the AI bay at Ocean City?

I've fished the islands around CBBT and Oyster and can tell you there are some fish to be had. The place is awesome and is begging to be explored. I was there last year when a well respected captain from the Va board caught his Tarpon and four others that same day. Many reports were coming into Chris's Bait and Tackle about other hooked Tarpon too.

I'll do some exploring with you. :yes: But I think up north by AI is another ball game. I don't think they have nearly the same salt content as the barrier islands and not enough dissolved O2 but I'm a rookie for that area and have never fished behind AI. Like someone said, a sleeping giant if you're will to explore and withstand the pain of those green flies.

A constant cigar burning might help and long sleeves, long pants. They can bite through those fancy fishing shirts made by cabelas and a pair of socks are no problem for them.
 

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At this time there is no inlet between OC and *****, but its coming one of these days. The fishing south of Wach can be much better due to tidal flushing.

Lance
 

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There is usually a good speckled trout bite in the fall in OC right? I was catching 14-20" red drum in my castnet and while spot fishing with clam in my canal on 28th street this fall too. These fish don't show up in the fall coming into the bay from the ocean. No, they're are leaving the bay headed for the ocean. So, where were they all summer? Way behind AI? Way up in the St. Martins? I don't know, but if I wasn't tuna fishing every weekend you can be damn sure I'd be trying to find out!
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Hey guys glada to see some others have the same adventorious spirit. I'm gonna look into a kayak that I can put in my 17' whaler and find some real skinny water......I just gotta find the time:eek: ........anybody selling any? I'll pay premium $$

Hey 'trouta how ya been? I'll call ya and we'll work something out. I hear they are bailing large hardheads down south, might be in for a PL trip one night soon, inteerested?
 

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Im waiting on that inlet too lance. The salt concentration in chinco bay can go higher than that of the ocean (34ppt) because of little flushing and high evapotranspiration. Not too fishey in the dead of summer but it turns on hot in the fall.

Not trying to jack the thread, but this is intresting reading

Newspaper Headline: SALT THE BAY

The Citizens of Stockton Anxious for it to be Done

STOCKTON, Md., Feb. 17, 1892, Editors Messenger: -- The citizens or this section of Worcester County greatly feel the need of having an Inlet cut from the Atlantic Ocean to Synepuxent Bay, at or near Winter Quarter Beach, by which the now fresh and stagnant water of the bay may become salted and fitted for the growing of oysters and other salt water luxuries. We have at least two hundred square miles of as fine a body of water as can be found in the United States for the propagation of fish, oysters, clams, etc., to say nothing of the fine gunning which it offers to those in search of game. If this body of water can be properly salted, it will be worth hundreds of thousands of dollars a year to this County and State, so it is well worth not only our consideration, but that of every citizen of Worcester County, as it will contribute to the prosperity of everyone.

We remember a few years ago when Green Run Inlet* was open that the bay was supplied with fish, oysters, and game in abundance, and I know when there was plenty of clams abreast of South Point and all the way down on the rocks and shoals clear to Chincoteague Island. Seine hauling and hook & line fishing were fine sport all up the bay. Now, it is a thing of the past; but, if the people will turn in and help nature by cutting an inlet, providence may smile on us again and keep it open. Just look at the situation for a moment -- it has only been a few years since this bay was dotted with small and large boats of all classes, engaged in fishing, clamming, and oystering, while, now, it is a rare thing to see one, unless some of the gunners up the county hear of a few ducks flying this way and then you may see one or two boats in pursuit of them. As all resources of food have vanished from the feeding grounds, the ducks and geese gave out, and they became an easy prey to the sportsman. One of our old and expert gunners is still living who can prove that some twenty-five years ago he killed in one day's gunning, mind you, 74 black ducks, 45 geese, and over 60 brant. Now this condition can be reestablished without a doubt if the people get fully aroused to the work of cutting the salt inlet. So much for the fish, clams, and wild fowl.

Now we'll say something about the oyster industry. In 1878, if I make no mistake, you could stand at George Island Landing and count in sight 42 schooners and sloops waiting to be loaded for the northern markets* with oysters all caught from the natural rocks of the bay, and in two weeks these boats were nearly all loaded and gone, and the fish boat loaded was back and ready to load again; the prices ranged from seventy-five cents to one dollar and thirty cents a bushel, which the oystermen well remember. Why not arouse the people with a sense of duty to such an enterprise and have those good old times returned again? We think if the people of this county will volunteer to help the cause it can be done with very little expense to any one person as we understand that Chincoteague, Greenbackville, and Franklin City are ready and willing to help us out. And if people from another state are willing to help us, why not try and raise courage to help ourselves? If the people of the county get aroused to the work of cutting the inlet. it will be a small matter to accomplish the work.

The simple reason that Winter Quarter Beach has been chosen as the proper place for cutting said inlet is because we have a broad bay and deep water running clear to the bench at this point and a narrow and level beach to cut through and we think that this vast body of water to support it that there can be no doubt of success. We would be glad to see the papers published in this county advocate the cause and for some of our citizens who are more experienced and more familiar with the surroundings of our bay than I am explain more plainly the situation. We want to hear from them. We understand that Mr. Dilworth, one the owners of the beach at the point where we propose to cut the inlet, will give the right of way and will assist in the work. The time and the arrangement for cutting this inlet may hereafter be agreed upon by calling meetings and appointing committees to make such necessary arrangements as to advance the work. We hope to hear through the papers from the people favorable reports of this enterprise.

I spoke in favor of the cutting of this inlet and how it would benefit all the people of the county, and I will try and make some statements to show the advantages: I think it would advance real estate along the entire bay, that it would bring in more labor, and there would more demand for the sale of lots for building purposes, which would require lumber to build the extra houses and give employment to carpenters and hundreds of others; merchants would be greatly benefitted and ought to encourage the good work and advocate the cause.

JOHN H. BURBAGE* [writer of the article]

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Footnotes by RFJ:

*Green Run Inlet: Green Run Inlet was located 13 ½ miles northeast of the Assateague Light House, somewhat off from Public Landing. Assateague Island is a long barrier island built by sand that persistent waves have raised from the ocean's gently sloping floor. The great storm of 1933 opened an inlet at Ocean City and caused one continuous shoreline to be divided into two islands: Fenwick Island and Assateague Island . The history of inlets on our barrier islands is most interesting. There have been at least eleven inlets since the first settlers arrived, whereas, today, there are only two: one at Chincoteague and one at Ocean City. One of the most important inlets, off from South Point, has been closed since 1817. It was the primary entrance into the Chincoteague Bay in colonial times, having opened up in 1735.

Very instructive for us in an 1874 account left by N. H. Bishop entitled "Voyage of the Paper Canoe." Bishop left Quebec in a wooden canoe eighteen feet in length, bound for the Gulf of Mexico. It was his intention to follow the natural and artificial connecting watercourses of the continent in the most direct line southward to the gulf coast of Florida, making portages as seldom as possible. He wanted to show how few were the interruptions to a continuous water-way for vessels of light draft. In chapter 8, he covers the section of the coast from Cape Henlopen to Norfolk, Virginia, and has this to say about our part of the world: "Commencing at Rehoboth Bay, a small boat may follow the interior waters to the Chesapeake Bay. The watercourses of this coast are protected from the rough waves of the ocean by long, narrow, sandy islands, known as beaches, between which the tides enter. These passages from the sea to the interior waters are called inlets, and most of them are navigable for coasting vessels of light draft. These inlets are so influenced by the action of storms, and their shores and locations are so changed by them, that the cattle may graze to-day in tranquil happiness where only a generation ago the old skipper navigated his craft. During June of the year 1821, a fierce gale opened Sandy Point Inlet with a foot depth of water, but it closed in 1831. Green Point Inlet was cut through the beach during a gale in 1837, and was closed up seven years later. Old Sinepuxent Inlet, which was forced open by the sea more than sixty years ago [that is, before 1814], closed in 1831. These three inlets were within a space of three miles, and were all north of Chincoteague village. Green Run Inlet, which had a depth of about six feet of water for nearly ten years, also closed after shifting half a mile to the south of its original location. The tendency of inlets on this coast is to shift to the southward . . . ." Bishop's entire text may be viewed at this link: click here

Storms produce inlets, tides keep them open, and waves transport sediment that fills them in. Occasional storms can drive waves and sands so forcefully that the beach and shoreline may change dramatically. The tide surge during a hurricane or nor'eastern can push the water over the beach and wherever there is a low area, a gully can be sliced through the sand and allow even more water to flood the bay. This is how the inlet was created at Ocean City. If the wind then shifts to the northwest, as it did in 1933, the backlash pushes the flood-water in the other direction, and, as it goes out to sea, the gully is turned into an inlet. It was not so much the force of the water flowing into the bay but the fact that water "stacked up" in the bay due to the wind, then, when the wind changed, it flowed out into the ocean with an incredible force. An inlet created in this way may last but a short time or for several decades. In time, the inlet will fill itself with sediment and disappear, and a new one will form in a new location. The inlet at Ocean City will not disappear because of man's intervention: the construction of stone jetties protruding seaward has blocked the normal drift of sand.

The mean elevation of Assateague Island is 6 feet above sea level. Some sand dunes, however, reach up to 30 feet in elevation. Once dunes are formed, they tend to migrate landward (mostly because of prevailing winds), which means the Chincoteague Bay will slowly become narrower. The best example of the "shifting sands" can be seen at the Assateague Lighthouse near Chincoteague. When it was built in 1833, it was very close to the oceanfront, whereas, today, it stands back a mile and a half from the beach. Assateague Island is thus slowly shifting and rolling westward as the sea level rises. On an average it rises, each century, from 0.5 to 1.5 feet.

The forces of nature truly prevail especially on Fenwick Island and Assateague Island. Our presence there is allowed by grace. Try as we might to protect our beach and to manage the dynamic systems of wind and tide, our efforts can only postpone the inevitable when nature has other plans. We must be accepting of the fact that the islands exist today, but may change dramatically tomorrow.

*the northern markets: It is somewhat surprising to learn that as late as 1878, the railroad, which arrived in Stockton in 1876, had not taken over the transport of our oysters, clams, and fish to the northern markets. Naturally, many watermen had invested in large boats and continued to ply the waters between George Island Landing and Taylor Landing and the northern cities. Obviously, before the railroad, maritime transport had been the only means of moving goods to market, and this reference to the multitude of schooners and sloops in 1878 is indicative of how active our maritime commerce was in the mid-1800s. It would take a decade or more before the railroad gained a considerable monopoly.
 

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Thanks for that interesting tid-bit Krabill. I live on George Island Rd., and have recently began exploring its great fall fishing.
 
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