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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm not sure if this is the right place to ask this question, but here goes!

I have a 1995 Lund Pro Bass 1790. It's a 17' aluminum boat. I use it for snakehead/bass fishing on the Potomac and crabbing (believe it or not). It's showing some classic signs that the transom board inside the aluminum transom is rotting and needs to be replaced (fairly common issue on older Lund boats). I've read that it's not a difficult job but it's labor intensive. My handy-man skills are terrible and I don't feel confident that I can do the job myself.

If anyone knows of someone in the area that can do this kind of work, please let me know. I'm hoping to get something lined up over the winter. The rest of the boat, motor, and trailer are in great shape so I'm hoping a repair may be an option over replacing the boat all together.

Thanks!
 

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Its not a hard job usually. I did my Smoker last year after I hit a rock in the Susky. Not sure how the Lund is but mine came out fairly easy and used it as a template and got marine plywood sandwiching 2 pieces and coating it. I also replaced the inner transom alum as it also was rotted. The repair shop wanted $2500 to 3 grand and I did it for $250. It turned out amazing and was much stronger. I have a 90 Hp 2 stroke merc and its heavy. I did not even realize it was as bad as it was. So much stronger now and even the motor sounds more solid. I have pics but always have problems getting them on here. Like bebopper said Youtube is your friend. I dont plan on ever having to replace it in my lifetime.
 

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I replaced the transom on a 19 ft Starcraft. Hardest part was getting the old transom out. Even if unsure of your skills, if you can get the old one out you should be able to use it as a template for new one. The Starcraft had a removable cap on top so old one lifted up and out. May have had to drill out some rivets.
I was able to get the 2 new pieces out of one sheet of marine plywood. Make sure grain runs the long way (horizontal) on at least one of the pieces. I used West System epoxy from west marine to glue pieces together, clamped it then used stainless screws. After it set I coated whole thing with West System. It was stronger than new and was still rock solid when I sold it after 10 hard years. As mention above it will save you big $$ if you can do it yourself.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the info. I called Redding Boat works (closest Lund dealer I could find) and they told me they could do it over the winter when things slow down for them. I'm not sure if this would be covered under warranty - I forgot to ask them.
 

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When you take your boat to Reading bring all your papers from when you purchased the boat if you are the original owner. Reading will contact Lund to determine if the repair is covered under the warranty of the original owner. If you purchased the boat used there will be no coverage. Reading is competent and pricing very fair.
 

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If you have a broken aluminum boat with several leaks and cracks. Don't worry, I will give you a guide to repairing the aluminum boat. Fixing a crack in the hull of the boat begins with using a butane torch to fully heat the crack’s surrounding area. Apply a brazen rod to the crack's sidewalls and keep a steady heat source on the crack. Brazen will dissolve, flow into the space, and then fill the opening. Brush it over the harmed area to completely cover the crack while awaiting the working area's cooling down. Do not forget to clean up any leftover slag or residue.
 

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You’ll need an engine hoist as the motor is quite heavy. I used pressure treated lumber to replace the plywood. Way cheaper then marine plywood. If the aluminum is riveted or bolted it’s an easy job. If it’s welded that’s another story.
 

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You’ll need an engine hoist as the motor is quite heavy. I used pressure treated lumber to replace the plywood. Way cheaper then marine plywood. If the aluminum is riveted or bolted it’s an easy job. If it’s welded that’s another story.
Might want to inspect that job on the inside. The copper in Pressure Treated lumber will react with and corrode the aluminum, usually resulting in pitting and holes.

You can just use exterior plywood. Marine and exterior utilize the same glue, it's just that all of the voids are filled in marine making it a bit stronger, but not necessary in this repair.
 

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MDFlyFisher,
Are you the original owner? Sounds like you found a place to take care of it. Woulld be awesome if Lund covered the repair.

MDRacer,
Did you use any kind of barrier coat before installing pressure treated wood? Many pressure treatment chemicals will react to the aluminum, but if you can seal the wood with resin, epoxy or even several heavy coats of paint thick enough, you may be able to isolate enough to prevent it.

A permanent way to replace a transom is to use Schedule 40 square pipe stacked and welded. I did my lake boat last year, using Mig and Argon gas. I also raised the transom height to 20". The 1/4" engine plate ties everything together. The end result is super strong. I wasn't quite done in this picture, but you get the idea:
Plant Vehicle Automotive tire Motor vehicle Automotive lighting


Here is how the boat sits now. Way overbuilt, but I couldn't be happier. I went from a 35 HP up to 50 HP and what an improvement. This beat-up old boat has become a capable, well-equipped ride. I run this one more than my center console, mainly because it's getting less desirable to tow hours to the Bay for one fish.

YouTube clip:
(191) So relaxing! Cruising on Lake Anna in my Jon boat - YouTube

Water Boat Watercraft Naval architecture Boats and boating--Equipment and supplies



But getting back to transoms, I recently picked up a Spectrum 16 Sport with a soft transom and other issues.. I got it for the price of the trailer, and it's a great shell, but doing this transom is going to be a nightmare. You can't even get to the transom core because it's sealed inside and out, and there is a ton of welded infrastructure on the inside - splashwell, seats, platform around the fuel tank and so on. Everything will have to be cut out with a cutting wheel. Trying to decide if this boat is worth it. I like the heavy build, the solid structure of the boat and the full windshield for crappy days. This one is going to be a total rebuild, which I normally don't mind, but that transom.... UGH!
Watercraft Vehicle Boat Plant community Wood


Wheel Watercraft Tire Boat trailer Boat
 

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MDFlyFisher,
Are you the original owner? Sounds like you found a place to take care of it. Woulld be awesome if Lund covered the repair.

MDRacer,
Did you use any kind of barrier coat before installing pressure treated wood? Many pressure treatment chemicals will react to the aluminum, but if you can seal the wood with resin, epoxy or even several heavy coats of paint thick enough, you may be able to isolate enough to prevent it.

A permanent way to replace a transom is to use Schedule 40 square pipe stacked and welded. I did my lake boat last year, using Mig and Argon gas. I also raised the transom height to 20". The 1/4" engine plate ties everything together. The end result is super strong. I wasn't quite done in this picture, but you get the idea:
View attachment 283578

Here is how the boat sits now. Way overbuilt, but I couldn't be happier. I went from a 35 HP up to 50 HP and what an improvement. This beat-up old boat has become a capable, well-equipped ride. I run this one more than my center console, mainly because it's getting less desirable to tow hours to the Bay for one fish.

YouTube clip:
(191) So relaxing! Cruising on Lake Anna in my Jon boat - YouTube

View attachment 283579


But getting back to transoms, I recently picked up a Spectrum 16 Sport with a soft transom and other issues.. I got it for the price of the trailer, and it's a great shell, but doing this transom is going to be a nightmare. You can't even get to the transom core because it's sealed inside and out, and there is a ton of welded infrastructure on the inside - splashwell, seats, platform around the fuel tank and so on. Everything will have to be cut out with a cutting wheel. Trying to decide if this boat is worth it. I like the heavy build, the solid structure of the boat and the full windshield for crappy days. This one is going to be a total rebuild, which I normally don't mind, but that transom.... UGH!
View attachment 283580

View attachment 283581

Lot of great info thanks!
Redid an old StarCraft about 40 years ago.
Toying with the idea of another, but not sure if I have it in me at this point.

Make matters worse, found an old 21' StarCraft Mariner that looks like it's lived in freshwater. Been sitting the last 20+ years too, registration was late '90s.
 

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MDFlyFisher,
Are you the original owner? Sounds like you found a place to take care of it. Woulld be awesome if Lund covered the repair.

MDRacer,
Did you use any kind of barrier coat before installing pressure treated wood? Many pressure treatment chemicals will react to the aluminum, but if you can seal the wood with resin, epoxy or even several heavy coats of paint thick enough, you may be able to isolate enough to prevent it.

A permanent way to replace a transom is to use Schedule 40 square pipe stacked and welded. I did my lake boat last year, using Mig and Argon gas. I also raised the transom height to 20". The 1/4" engine plate ties everything together. The end result is super strong. I wasn't quite done in this picture, but you get the idea:
View attachment 283578

Here is how the boat sits now. Way overbuilt, but I couldn't be happier. I went from a 35 HP up to 50 HP and what an improvement. This beat-up old boat has become a capable, well-equipped ride. I run this one more than my center console, mainly because it's getting less desirable to tow hours to the Bay for one fish.

YouTube clip:
(191) So relaxing! Cruising on Lake Anna in my Jon boat - YouTube

View attachment 283579


But getting back to transoms, I recently picked up a Spectrum 16 Sport with a soft transom and other issues.. I got it for the price of the trailer, and it's a great shell, but doing this transom is going to be a nightmare. You can't even get to the transom core because it's sealed inside and out, and there is a ton of welded infrastructure on the inside - splashwell, seats, platform around the fuel tank and so on. Everything will have to be cut out with a cutting wheel. Trying to decide if this boat is worth it. I like the heavy build, the solid structure of the boat and the full windshield for crappy days. This one is going to be a total rebuild, which I normally don't mind, but that transom.... UGH!
View attachment 283580

View attachment 283581
If you can get a drill in to clean it out for the most part there are pour in options.
 

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Lot of great info thanks!
Redid an old StarCraft about 40 years ago.
Toying with the idea of another, but not sure if I have it in me at this point.

Make matters worse, found an old 21' StarCraft Mariner that looks like it's lived in freshwater. Been sitting the last 20+ years too, registration was late '90s.
Where? Those are GREAT boats, as long as they aren't corroded out. You may have found a gem. You might want to consider that one.

I recently bought 16' and a 18' Starcraft Mariners. The 16' was stripped, but is coming back together nicely. This is when I got it a few weeks ago:
Plant Boat Vehicle Watercraft Boats and boating--Equipment and supplies
Plant Wood Tree Natural landscape Grass


And this is yesterday. I got the new deck in with a sanded finish. I had a little side console that fit it perfectly, and the Suzuki runs smooth as butter:

Hood Motor vehicle Vehicle Watercraft Boat
Hood Asphalt Road surface Grass Motor vehicle


This boat has a ton of open space in it. My nephews love it just as it sits. Right now, I'm trying to decide whether to add a front platform or not. It feels good as-is, but a raised front deck would give more standing room up there and give some storage space.

I'm going to sell this one, so trying to be efficient. Don't want to spend too much time on something buyers don't want.
 

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If you can get a drill in to clean it out for the most part there are pour in options.
And that's the issue... getting into the transom.

I've done numerous SeaCast transoms, and I love that product. I even have half a bucket left over out in the shop. But it requires a sealed area. Not sure if the bottom of this transom is sealed off, and I think no matter what, it's going to require cutting a lot of aluminum. Once I get the title back from NC Wildlife, I'm going to take a serious look and try to determine the best course of action.

That being said, this MIGHT be the boat to replace the Prince Craft. It's a few inches longer and wider, which is not a big deal, but I think I like the windshield. Would be perfect for sloppy and/or cold days. Also, it has a livewell system, and is built a lot heavier, so I might be able to venture out of the inlets on nicer days than with my current jon.

I have much to consider IF I can get it in seaworthy condition.
 

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Oh, and here is a picture of the floor finish:
Grey Water Pattern Electric blue Sky


I almost went with vinyl flooring, but it needs to be wrapped and tucked, and this construction didn't lend itself to that very well. The sanded finish is comfortable in bare feet (feels like concrete) and gives excellent grip no matter what the footwear. And it's easy to touch up, as long as you save some of the deck paint.
 
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