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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My father kept an extensive hunting and fishing log book back in the late 60's- early 70's and I read it from time to time for both entertainment as well as comparison to fishing today. Now to set the tone, my father was an avid outdoorsman and in any 7 day span he would log 4 or 5 post in his log book anywhere from Hampton roads to Cape Hatteras. Anything from bass fishing to frog gigging to duck hunting or saltwater fishing. I often wonder how he stayed married with two young children at home. Now I have complete confidence in his knowledge and accuracy but reading it last night I came across a post from 8/17/69 that left me in disbelief. He had logged that he and a fishing buddy caught 84 bluefish and 46 Amberjack at Bluefish rock. 46 Amberjack at bluefish rock????? Can anyone on here share any knowledge or chances of this be correct? Thanks in advance.
 

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Wish I had kept logs. Answer to your question- he married a very good woman!
IMHO, this info needs to be shared with all our government officials. Keep it safe, Omega would like to keep that hidden! It sad how much the fishing has dropped off in such a short time!
I remember people catching Wahoo inside of bay-bridge tunnel. I don't doubt jacks were here to.
 

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A guy came into Greentop one day claiming that he fought an Amberjack for 45 minutes on a flounder jigging rod at the 4th island a few years ago. It could just be a story, but with water temperatures in the mid 70's, why not right.
 

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Fishermen's names for fish often lead to confusion because so many different names are used for the same species and the same name is often applied to many different species. For example the inshore fish "whiting" in the drum family are also called kingfish, roundheads, sea mullet, and other names by different fishermen in different areas. Another example is that many small panfish are generically called "perch" by some fishermen which may include white and yellow perch as well as a number of sunfish species.

Its possible he was catching another species of jack and called them amberjack. Crevalle, almaco jacks, banded rudderfish and other species of jacks may be found in the lower bay. It possible there was a large number of one of those other jack species in the VA bay that year. I guess its also possible he was catching AJs but most fishermen encounter them in the ocean these days not inshore in the Bay.

http://www.mrc.virginia.gov/vswft/Angler_Guide/angler_web_guide.pdf
 

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Wish I had kept logs. Answer to your question- he married a very good woman!
IMHO, this info needs to be shared with all our government officials. Keep it safe, Omega would like to keep that hidden! It sad how much the fishing has dropped off in such a short time!
I remember people catching Wahoo inside of bay-bridge tunnel. I don't doubt jacks were here to.
Probably kings. Wahoo? that's crazy talk, but I wasn't alive then
 

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I can tell you this. I know a couple pier owners in Nags Head. They tell me back in the 70's they piers used to catch a lot of small AJ's(couple pounds). It would be interesting to know if he mentioned the size of them. So i think it is highly likely they caught them, but they might not be the reef donkeys we are all thinking about, just juvenile fish.
 

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Interesting! Did it say what time they left and came back? I would say that from the moment an angler hooks a good sized amberjack, until it is either in the box or back in the water would be a minimum of 10 minutes... So that's 460 minutes minimum, devided by two anglers, then you have to hook another fish, this doesn't include the minute or two for each of the 84 bluefish, time to run/anchor/launch boat, eat lunch, etc. That had to be one heck of a long and busy day on the water!
 

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Probably kings. Wahoo? that's crazy talk, but I wasn't alive then
I had a helper ( named bud) who was on charter -inside of bay- that was on the rod when the wahoo jumped into boat biting the captain of the boat .
They had to go in to port quickly, Capt got over 100 stitches. Was in paper. Don't remember yr.
I do remember it being unusual at that time for wahoo in bay. I remember hearing of kings all around BBT in late 80s .

Great example of different names fish are called. If I remember right the paper called it a Kingfish. ( which s another name for Wahoo) http://www.landbigfish.com/fish/fish.cfm?ID=121
 

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Good morning. 1st of all there was no indication of the size of the AJ's that were being caught; therefor, who knows how long each battle would have lasted. We have caught juvenile AJ's inside the Bay as recently as 2 years ago; around 2-4 lbs.. With that said, I think that there is a strong possibility the author of the log knows what he is talking about. Really, it's just another example of what the Chesapeake Bay "was" like. Full of fish and bait!! On a side note, we have caught juvenile Grouper at the 3rd Island many times in September/ October while trolling for Spanish and Blues. Fish On

Zigh

><((((*>
 

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Around the early 90`s, when the influx of cobia started to show along the cbbt, I had 2 Jack Crevels hit the deck of my boat
in the month of July! The fish were in the 15-20 lb class! This only happened one time and hyasn`t since. So mho is the AJ catch happened!!
They bay IS NOT alive like it use to be!!, remember when you gould go on any hard bottom and take bloodworms and catch
all the big spot and blowtoads (sugar toads) anywhere you went. Well not anymore.. DAMN SHAME !!!
Capt. Skid "One Mo Pass"
 

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People use to think it was crazy to catch a tarpon in Va. now we know they come here. in the late 60's and early 70's my dad use to talk about all of the cobia in the Potomac. Great Whites were thought to never venture in to warm waters. Now we know they go down to the Bahamas and in to the Gulf of Mexico. I saw gaffer dolphins two years ago within sight of Rudee. You just never know
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks guys for all of the comments. His log did not mention the size of fish and I too was wondering if it was a misidentification. I considered my father very knowledgeable about most things outdoors but he would have only been 28 yrs old at the time of this log so maybe he was in a learning stage of saltwater fishing. I do know saltwater fishing was not his first love and he progressed away from freshwater fishing into saltwater. He was a tremendous trout and flounder fisherman long before GPS and would locate favorite fishing holes by lining up multiple visual references. As far as time on the water, when my father went fishing he was going to make a day of it. When fishing with him you had better pack breakfast, lunch, dinner and several layers of clothing. Most days it would be flounder fish all day then head to the high rise at sunset and trout fish until 9 or 10 pm. He passed away when I was 25 and I wish time and time again I would have paid better attention and learned more from him than I did. But as a teenager still unsure of a what a "flounder bite" felt like it was a long boring day and sometimes a cold day. Thanks for all the responses!
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Forgot to mention another post in his log book that has amazed me. While I do not have a lot of surf fishing experience it's hard for me to imagine. On 12/29 - 12/30 of 1972 I believe. They were surf fishing at Cape Hatteras and caught 122 flounder in the 2-5# range between the two days. 122 flounder the last week of December?? Amazing!! Thanks again and tight lines fellows.
 

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So back in the late 80's I spent many many days and nights and entire weekends on the Nags Head Pier manning a live bait rig, there were days that we caught Sailfish, Mahi, Amber Jack, Jack Crevelle, Bar Jacks, Kings, Cobia and Tarpon (mostly hooked and lost) and huge Spanish. The water in the Summer would get so clear you could see the bottom on the end in 25-30' of water, and you could see an occasional Flounder on the bottom. The days could be hot and long and guys would spend hours seeing who could get that Flounder to bite, it passed the time while waiting on Kings mostly.

the Sails and Mahi I saw caught were caught on Gotcha plugs and were small, but I missed a day where 2 adult Sails were lost in one day on a live bunker. We would watch huge schools of Bunker go up and down the beach in the summer and some days that's all we could get for live bait.

so I really don't doubt for one second that the mouth of the Bay could hold an array of fish that no one these days could even imagine.
 

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I had a helper ( named bud) who was on charter -inside of bay- that was on the rod when the wahoo jumped into boat biting the captain of the boat .
They had to go in to port quickly, Capt got over 100 stitches. Was in paper. Don't remember yr.
I do remember it being unusual at that time for wahoo in bay. I remember hearing of kings all around BBT in late 80s .

Great example of different names fish are called. If I remember right the paper called it a Kingfish. ( which s another name for Wahoo) http://www.landbigfish.com/fish/fish.cfm?ID=121
kingfish is not a nick name for wahoo, its slang for king mackeral.
 

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kingfish is not a nick name for wahoo, its slang for king mackeral.
Sorry I did not say "nick name"... but yes some call them that! ( my granfather did)
He fished Europe, Pacific and our waters- Florida to long island.
I have hear what I call wahoo. even small striped drum called" kingfish" Last yr.
Think it was 80's when I hear them called tiger mac's.. by one fisherman..
"slang" I really believe depends on location and were your from!
BTW, Link I provided called them Pacific Kingfish.
 
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