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We were on a charter out of Kentmmor Wednesday.

Is that the normal amount of ships anchored ther? I counted 9 and they all looked like the same type of cargo ship.

MG
 

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For the past 2 years there have been a large # of empty cargo ships anchored off Annapolis. Some ore carriers and some Ro-Ro's. Fuel prices made it more cost effective to moor the ships, put minimal crew on them, and wait for the next round of orders. Its a sign of the economy.
 

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The coal ships take coal that is mined in West Virginia to other countries.

US power plants can not burn it - due to air pollution standards.

Only trouble - the air pollution circles back to the US.
 

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Without going into details:
More than half of the nation's electricity is generated from coal.
In West Virginia 99% of the generated electricity comes from coal.
There are apprx 600 coal fired electric generating facilities located in the US.
Coal provides the majority of electric power in 32 states.
 

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The coal ships take coal that is mined in West Virginia to other countries.

US power plants can not burn it - due to air pollution standards.

Only trouble - the air pollution circles back to the US.
100% false, on all counts. I was an officer on a coal ship in 2004, we were on a regular liner run which that ship has done since built in 1982 and continues to do to this day. Run starts in Baltimore with a load of 40,000 LT coal, drops off in Fall River, Mass. where it is burned for power, next run is Fall River Mass to Norfolk, DTA terminal for another 40,000 lt's, back to fall river, mass. dropped off at the power plant, next run to Colombia for another 40,000 lts back to fall river.

The coal pile at the plant in Fall River is the combination of the three blends of coal, the south american coal is mixed with the Penn/WVA coal, and some western coal until the sulphur content is low enough to burn. US power plants are burning US coal, no doubt about it.

On a second note, they are NOT tankers, like mentioned above. There is no tanker terminal in Baltimore, these ships are going into Curtis Bay, and loading out where the rail yard brings in the coal, by CNX and CONSOL energy

There are many reasons why they are anchored, some waiting on coal, some waiting on weather and some waiting on pilots. Chesapeake uses a two pilot system, you can pick up a federal pilot out of Cape May, or Norfolk for the run up the bay or down through the C&D, but as soon as you make your approach to Baltimore, you have to pick-up a Baltimore Harbour, docking pilot who takes over east of the Key bridge.

Tide is also critical on a coal ship where draft will change 10 ft or more, They have to go in at low tide in order to have enough time to load out and be under way before the next low tide, or they will sit on bottom. Its a tight window and if you don't hit it just right, you have to wait 24 hours for your next shot, so combine that timing, pilot window and your spot at the dock, you get a back up.

On a second note on weather, a federal pilot died in 2006 boarding the Central Gulf Lines ship the Energy Enterprise (the same coal ship I drove up /down the bay) while climbing the ladder off Cape May in Feb., Since then the pilot association has implemented stricter boarding rules, since this pilot fell off the ladder in rough weather and was never found. When we have days like we have had in the past w/ 35 kt winds and cold temperatures, the pilots simply are not going to board, hence the start of a back up...
 

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100% false, on all counts. I was an officer on a coal ship in 2004, we were on a regular liner run which that ship has done since built in 1982 and continues to do to this day. Run starts in Baltimore with a load of 40,000 LT coal, drops off in Fall River, Mass. where it is burned for power, next run is Fall River Mass to Norfolk, DTA terminal for another 40,000 lt's, back to fall river, mass. dropped off at the power plant, next run to Colombia for another 40,000 lts back to fall river.

The coal pile at the plant in Fall River is the combination of the three blends of coal, the south american coal is mixed with the Penn/WVA coal, and some western coal until the sulphur content is low enough to burn. US power plants are burning US coal, no doubt about it.

On a second note, they are NOT tankers, like mentioned above. There is no tanker terminal in Baltimore, these ships are going into Curtis Bay, and loading out where the rail yard brings in the coal, by CNX and CONSOL energy

There are many reasons why they are anchored, some waiting on coal, some waiting on weather and some waiting on pilots. Chesapeake uses a two pilot system, you can pick up a federal pilot out of Cape May, or Norfolk for the run up the bay or down through the C&D, but as soon as you make your approach to Baltimore, you have to pick-up a Baltimore Harbour, docking pilot who takes over east of the Key bridge.

Tide is also critical on a coal ship where draft will change 10 ft or more, They have to go in at low tide in order to have enough time to load out and be under way before the next low tide, or they will sit on bottom. Its a tight window and if you don't hit it just right, you have to wait 24 hours for your next shot, so combine that timing, pilot window and your spot at the dock, you get a back up.

On a second note on weather, a federal pilot died in 2006 boarding the Central Gulf Lines ship the Energy Enterprise (the same coal ship I drove up /down the bay) while climbing the ladder off Cape May in Feb., Since then the pilot association has implemented stricter boarding rules, since this pilot fell off the ladder in rough weather and was never found. When we have days like we have had in the past w/ 35 kt winds and cold temperatures, the pilots simply are not going to board, hence the start of a back up...
or they could be broken down. Back in 2006 I was a passenger on a ship heading into the port of Baltimore when the motor died. We had to anchor just outside Annapolis and wait for assistance. Since no one on the boat could speak the Baltimore language we had to wait on a translator. There are only so many mechanics that speak multiple languages or that's just what Sea Tow told us.
 

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or they could be broken down. Back in 2006 I passenger on a ship heading into the port of Baltimore when the motor died. We had to anchor just outside Annapolis and wait for assistance. Since no one on the boat could speak the Baltimore language we had to wait on a translator. There are only so many mechanics that speak multiple languages or that's just what Sea Tow told us.
OWE ,Malley said the NEW AMERICANS speak many languages , sorry thats when they are in the welfare line
 
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