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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So far I am just wrapping up my first season of 'yak fishing, and since I both like and participate in so many different kinds of fishing, I only made a few 'yak trips so my upper body is not in even relatively 'peak' paddling shape, and probably never will be! Nothing much in my everyday life calls for raising my arms very high, so combined with no longer being a young buck I'll fatigue more quickly when doing so. To those who like being able to people power their way for long distances against winds/currents, my hat's truly off to 'ya... but I'm looking for any/all mechanical advantages, personally. Thus when surfing around and I came across...

http://www.gullwingpaddles.com/index.html

... I was naturally curious. At my level of experience, its hard to separate mere glitter (promotional claims) from gold (significant marginal utility). And there's no $ to waste on a whim either.

Has anyone with some real, long-term paddling experience tried/used these?

Any/all comments (pro- or con-) are very welcome. :yes:
 

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Don,
I use an ergonomic bent shaft paddle (AT), which, in my mind, has made paddling more efficient and fun for me. I think they are definitely worth a look, although most are pretty pricey (Bending Branches also makes a nice one). If you're fishing hard structure such as pilings and oyster rakes then blade durability becomes an issue that you want to be aware of. I think AT does a pretty good job in this regard. I am not aware of any shop that carries any of these paddles locally but you can probably get all that info on the web. Good luck,

Steve, Greenbelt
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Steve, then there's probably something to the alternative paddle designs after all. One thing about the GullWing design that really caught my attention was simply the notion that it would straddle across the 'yak in balanced fashion. Mostly I fish freshwater, but appreciated the mention of the rougher, saltier considerations for the blade.
 
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