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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a Seaswirl 1851DC on a single axle venture (roller) trailer. The trailer came with a pair of post guide on's near the rear of the trailer. I have adjusted them to be fairly close to the rub rail of the boat. Centering the rear of the boat to sit properly on the rear rollers has been somewhat better since I did this.

However, the galvanized brackets are now rusting away and I am faced with a decision. Another set of posts or move to brackets (which I have on my other boat trailer for my jon boat and they work good).

I'm looking for opinions. What do fellow Tidal Fishers prefer for their larger boats (excluding jon boats, etc).

many thanks and tight lines.

FC
 

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My opinion and my boat trailers have posts with the l.e.d's on top .outrage . Reservoir rig. River & duck boat . Could not do without.
 

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If you dont dunk your trailer too far into the water, there is no need for guide-ons. Just get the back of the rollers or the bunk under the water and allow the v of the boat to naturally center it on the trailer. Most guys who have difficulty getting the boat on the trailer straight usually dunk their trailers too far into the water allowing the boat to float too much coming up on the trailer.
 

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My last boat had lighted, post type guide ons. My current boat has bunk style guide ons. I have been thinking about adding lighted posts behind the bunks. Lighted posts are great for trailering at night and make it a whole lot easier when backing down the ramps....IMO.
 

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Posts for me. It helps when a lot of boats are launching make wakes.. We all know some boats need to set at a certain place on the trailer and this will help you with that. Also helps when you launch alone. Mark your posts with tape, when you find the sweet spot making the launch/load easier.
 

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Mine has posts in the back and bunks on the sides. Took the bunk guides off last year. Have not missed them. Also easier to clean/wax the hull without them.
 

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For my application I need the guide posts AND the best thing I ever did was replace my trailer wiring with orange extension cord and move my lights to the top of the guide posts. This way I have no connections from the tongue of the trailer to the lights exposed to moisture. Having guide posts also helps in backing an empty trailer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
thanks for everyone who responded. The knowledge one can get from everyone on TidalFish is priceless.

One more question about the posts -- how much space do you recommend should there be between the post and the rub-rail when the boat is on the trailer? When I bought the rig, there were several inches between the posts and the rails. I moved the posts closer (about 3/4") to the rail. Frankly, I'd like to more them even closer so that I can be a bit more certain that the rear of the boat is sitting properly between the rear rollers -- sometimes the boat will be slightly askew and the bottom-most chine on 1 side of the boat will be sitting on the roller (by say 1"). However, I wouldn't want the posts to wearout the rub-rails in-transit.

thanks again and tight lines

FC
 

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You may have to mount the posts slightly off center to help compensate for the stern not centering on your trailer. First, make sure your boat is perfectly centered on the trailer (chines off rollers) then mount your posts leaving an equal distance from rub rails to posts, I'd say 1.5" minimum on each side.

Keep in mind the guide posts are not intended to keep your boat centered when in tow, just easier loading...and they really do help when backing up an empty trailer. Make sure your rear tie downs are good & tight with equal pressure on both sides, which should help prevent too much horizontal movement. Hope this helps some.

I really like TerpHeels brake light set-up :thumbup:
 

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I keep mine tight to the boat so when I pull it out of the water it settles down on the trailer in the center. I have the plastic ones.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Again, thanks for all the suggestions and insight. 1 of the galvanized pieces turned out to be sound so I wire brushed the rust, primed, and painted it -- should get me through a few more years. The other I wire brushed and decided to JB weld the few holes and reinstalled. when it fails, I may just pick up a single galvanized pole as a replacement -- saves a few bucks for fishing equipment instead.

tight lines

FC
 
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