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OK, I have been thinking this weekend while at works and watching the weather forcasts for the next few days. I was a Zoology major in school so here is what I am asking?

We know that most if not all large rockfish (>32inches) are females, what happens to the male fish?

My guesses in order are
1)The male fish have a shorter natural life span and thus die off.

2)Males have a smaller growth curve (grow less in one year than females)

3) Males stop growing (I realy doubt this b/c all fish have perpetual growht , which means as they get older they grow unlike most mammals which eventually stop growing)

4) They have indeterminate sexual characteristics and actually change sex as they grow older (Dont laugh some groupers in the Carribean actually do this)

I am just curious and too lazy to do a google search. By the way who is thinking about getting out Tuesday?

Jim
 

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Striped bass were originally thought to change sex when they got older. But that is not the case.

Ever fish the Susquhanna Flats in late April when the bite is hot? Ever catch a fish over 40 up on the flat? See sperm pouring out of it? MOst of those fish on the flats are males and some can be over 50". Capt Tom Hughes has a picture of a 50+" fish spitting milt.

The big males are around and I'm sure a lot of large ocea fish are males too.
 

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4) They have indeterminate sexual characteristics and actually change sex as they grow older (Dont laugh some groupers in the Carribean actually do this)
That's called Heterogynous Hermaphoditism, and is not uncommon in the Bass family. Black Seabass do this, but Striped Bass do not.
 
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