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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Good Morning,

I went fishing last night and caught these beauties (bluefish, spot and one white perch) in the waters of Southern Maryland at Solomons Pier. I took one of the spots that I caught and fillet it and sliced it into small strips, then used them to catch all but one of the Bluefish. One bluefish was caught with fresh shrimp and the spot were caught with bloodworms. :fishing2:

The bite was really, really slow. :popcorn: However, as you can see it was well worth the wait and effort. :clapping2:

I hope you all will have a great day! :yes:

Peace. :))
 

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Kept a one man limit of blues on Saturday that close friend smoked up on Sunday. Fantastic eating!
 

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Glad to see someone else thinks bluefish are good eating. We seem to be a minority here. Its us vrs the "blues are catfood" crowd :2guns:

The past month or so I've been making a poor mans smoked fish with blues and macs on my conventional propane BBQ with an oven-like lid. I leave the skins on, and put the fillets flesh side up an aluminum foil. Then I paint the fillets with a soy-garlic sauce. Best to use one with no sugar (or very little at least). The Soy Vay marinade and sauce is great for this. For blues you can stir in a bit of mustard as well (blues and mustard are a natural combo).

After heating the BBQ up to max, I put the fish and foil on the top shelf of the BBQ at one end, and turn the BBQ down as far as it goes. I leave one burner on at the opposite end; that gets me an upper shelf temp of 225 F or so.

If I want to be fancy I make a foil pouch of mesquite or other smoking chips, punch a few holes in it, and put it on grill directly over the burner that stays on.

I leave that for however long I have. The fish is probably cooked within a half an hour, but to get the smoked flavor and consistency, leave it on for 2 to 4 hours.

The fish is great eaten right off the skin, on top of a salad, or shredded and mixed with mayo to make a pate and eaten on crackers, bread or whatever.

Fishing in the morning, quick cook/smoke, and eaten for dinner that evening...not bad at all ! :chef:
 

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While the bluefish are here, and it is perfect weather for beer and a bonfire, give this a try :

Catch a few nice size bluefish.
Grab some tinfoil and some black pepper and salt.
Take the fish and rub a knife across the fish from tail to head and knock off most of the scales.
run it under some cold water to rinse off the loose scales.

Now picture a big dead tuna from Wicked Tuna, can you see it on the scale ??.. good think of that shape

Cut off the bluefish head behind the gills.
Cut off the belly/gut section down to the anal fin
Cut off the tail.
Cut off the top fin , it is ok to leave the bones
One last cut, just run the knife straight down the bottom from the tail to belly, enough to break the skin.

Now wash the fish again under some cold water. Be sure to scrape out the belly wall.

Heavily salt and pepper the entire fish, lots of pepper.
This will be on the outside skin of he fish so do be shy on the salt or pepper

Now lay the fish in the middle of a large piece of tinfoil
Fold he foil over the fish, and then roll the fish in the foil, and twist the ends. (insert Cheech and Chong joke here).
It should look like when you roast corn on the cob in a fire.
Note: the foil should have at 3 or 4 layers thick between the fish and the air, so don't skimp on the foil.

Place the foiled fish in the coals, and try to cover/surround them in coals, and let them roast for about 12-15 minutes.

Pull them out and let them sit for 5 minutes. Then tear the twisted ends off and unroll the foil.

The fish should split open right down the middle Most of the time the skin will stick to the foil, which is a good thing !.
Once it splits, just find the skeleton and it should lift right out in one big piece. Then you'll have 2 sides of meat.
It will come right off the skin. You can avoid the 'red' strips which are the darker fishy meat if you don't like the taste.

Wash down with a cold beer, or six.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks for the instructions Ready2Reel. Those are some really good looking bluefish!

Have a great evening.

Peace.
 

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While the bluefish are here, and it is perfect weather for beer and a bonfire, give this a try :

Catch a few nice size bluefish.
Grab some tinfoil and some black pepper and salt.
Take the fish and rub a knife across the fish from tail to head and knock off most of the scales.
run it under some cold water to rinse off the loose scales.

Now picture a big dead tuna from Wicked Tuna, can you see it on the scale ??.. good think of that shape

Cut off the bluefish head behind the gills.
Cut off the belly/gut section down to the anal fin
Cut off the tail.
Cut off the top fin , it is ok to leave the bones
One last cut, just run the knife straight down the bottom from the tail to belly, enough to break the skin.

Now wash the fish again under some cold water. Be sure to scrape out the belly wall.

Heavily salt and pepper the entire fish, lots of pepper.
This will be on the outside skin of he fish so do be shy on the salt or pepper

Now lay the fish in the middle of a large piece of tinfoil
Fold he foil over the fish, and then roll the fish in the foil, and twist the ends. (insert Cheech and Chong joke here).
It should look like when you roast corn on the cob in a fire.
Note: the foil should have at 3 or 4 layers thick between the fish and the air, so don't skimp on the foil.

Place the foiled fish in the coals, and try to cover/surround them in coals, and let them roast for about 12-15 minutes.

Pull them out and let them sit for 5 minutes. Then tear the twisted ends off and unroll the foil.

The fish should split open right down the middle Most of the time the skin will stick to the foil, which is a good thing !.
Once it splits, just find the skeleton and it should lift right out in one big piece. Then you'll have 2 sides of meat.
It will come right off the skin. You can avoid the 'red' strips which are the darker fishy meat if you don't like the taste.

Wash down with a cold beer, or six.
. You forgot the old bay.and wipe fish down with olive oil1st.
 

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We had skinless bluefish fillets last night. Broiled the fillets with sliced tomatoes and green peer on the top. Good eating!
 

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They make awesome cakes. Broil them on a piece of foil (do not spray foil so skin sticks). Pull filets from oven and remove meat with fork leaving skin. Place meat in a bowl and let it cool. Flake it and add salt, pepper, italian bread crumbs, worcestshire sauce, an egg, and mayo and mix well. Cake the meat into patties. Fry in 375 to 400 degree oil. Let cool and eat or freezer bag. In the freezer bag the cakes last about 6 months before they start to get "fishy". Put them in the toaster oven to reheat. Awesome on a bun with lettuce/tomato or alone with your favorite dipping sauce.

Never understood why folks don't like them. My wife and I fish hard for them once a year and make a monster batch of cakes to freeze that gets us threw the winter.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Thanks Bluefish 1928. I actually do that with the catfish that I catch. This is a good reminder.

Have a great day!
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I like that idea BluefishNC. I hope to get out there again in the next week or 2. Maybe even travel to Point Lookout. I hear they're really jumping out of the water there.

Have a great day.
 

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OK, here's my recipe for the smoker:

Smoked Bluefish or Mackerel Recipe

Ingredients:
•hardwood chips
•1/4 cup coarse salt
•1/4 cup sugar
•4 fish fillets, skin on
•2 Tablespoons freshly ground black pepper
•1 Tablespoon Dijon mustard (don't worry, you won't taste strong mustard)
•2 Tablespoons fresh lemon juice

Preparation:
Soak the wood chips in water to cover for at least 1 hour, and as long as 24 hours.

Mix together the salt and sugar and sprinkle the fish on both sides. Let sit in refrigerator for at least an hour. Remove filets from refrigerator and discard fluid collected in pan. (That is most of the oil in the flesh). Wipe most of the sugar/salt mixture off filets with your fingers, leaving a light coating on both sides.

Mix together the pepper, Dijon mustard, and lemon juice and rub into flesh side of the fillets.

If you are using a charcoal grill, remove the racks and build a small fire. When the coals are hot, move them to one side, top with the chips, and replace the racks. Place the fish on a sheet of aluminum foil. Put the foil on the side of the grill away from the coals. Poke some holes in the foil and cover the grill, closing all the vents but one. Check the fish for doneness after 30 minutes.

If you are using a gas grill, remove the racks, turn the heat of one burner to low, and top the lava rocks or heat plate over that burner with the soaked chips. Replace the rack. Place the fish on a sheet of aluminum foil; put the foil on the side of the grill away from the lit burner. Poke some holes in the foil and cover the grill. Check the fish for doneness after 25 minutes; it should be firm, with a shiny crust, and opaque but not dry inside.

If you are using a water smoker, put chips on coals as normal. Check for doneness after 45 minutes to 1 hour.

Smoked fish may be eaten warm as-is, or cold on crackers or in hors d'oeuvres. I like to mix with sour cream and cream cheese to make a dip or spread.
 
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