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I'm looking to get my boat bottom painted and have talked to 6 differant full service marinas. Everyone of them has given me a differant version of what gets done as well as the actual paint that is used. I'd sure appreciate some answers if anyone could help out here. First, this is a new, never painted hull. Does dewaxing need to be done? Is dewaxing just another name for sanding? If so what grit is used for sanding? Is a barrier coat then applied? Is a barrier coat the same as a primer coat. Last but not least, should regular hard anti-fouling paint or ablative paint bu used. This is a trailerable power boat (25 Parker). Any recommendation on paint? Thanks in advance for you help.
 

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I agree with captin george. I would only consider painting if the boat is in left in the water over a week. It depends on the area to how fast barnicals will start to grow but in most areas they will start to form in about 7 to 10 days.
 

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To answere your original question here's is the Interlux guide web site.
http://www.yachtpaint.com/usa/boat_painting_guide/pdf/antifouling/fiberglass.pdf
I use the Interlux ACT ablative bottom paint and it works great for me. My boat stays in the water from May thru November and a quick power wash at the end of the season leaves the bottom looking like it was just painted. A lot of people repaint the btm everyother year but after the initial two coast I just apply one coat every spring. The ACT doesn't take much if any prep work prior to painting. Look at the ACT spec sheet. Good luck and hope this answeres your question. I have a 25' walkaround and one gal covers perfectly.
 

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I use the ACT ablative paint. Having it on there gives me the confidence I need when I leave her in the water. Now that I have it ont there I leave it in the water most of the time, but I will trailer it to Hatteras a couple of times a year.

That is where the problem comes in. I have a trailer with bunks (not rollers). Though easier to maintain, it does a number on the paint when I put it on/off of the trailer and I have to touch it up each time. Therefore, I try to avoid trailering as much as possible.

Be sure the bottom paint you choose has the ability to haul it in and out. (Most ablative paint does)

From what I understand, the Barrier coat is necessary if you aren't going to sand the bottom of the boat prior to application.
I had a professional do the paint the first time (they used a primer coat) and this year I put it on myself. Not too tough a job, but it was messy. Make sure to use (at least) two coats when you apply.

Anyway, I love having the boat in the water while maintaining the ability to trailer it/take it out. I have seen what not having a bottom paint on your boat will do if you keep her in for more than a week or two in the summer... I use the boat a lot more and getting underway is a whole lot easier/faster than drydocking or trailering.

On the other hand there are some drawbacks too. You will have to maintain the paint and you will lose a couple of knots off of your top end while increasing your fuel consumption due to incread drag.

In my opinion: If you are going to keep it in the water more than a two weeks at a time, do it. Otherwise, do not. If you do paint it, keep her in the water.
 
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