Tidal Fish Forum banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
707 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
is the split limb on bows designed to dampen the vibration or is this just a marketing/relatively new look for bows? what is the idea behind it?

my dad gave me a new bow for christmas but told me if i like something else i can go ahead and exchange it (the bear whitetail quest from bps). i know it is primarily entry-level but is it worth getting into a bow with split limbs? i don't want to upgrade for no reason.

i am on a budget so please don't tell me how i need a $500-700 bow.

thanks
mike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
586 Posts
I would go with solid limb.

That being said I have many friends that love split limb, especially PSE.

I have never owned a split limb bow but would consider it. I shot alot of different bows before I bought the 1 I have now. I will stick with Mathews from here on out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
142 Posts
http://www.huntersfriend.com/bowselection.htm#solidsplit

Lots of good info in at above address.

Solid Limbs vs. Split Limbs:

This is a tough one, but it basically boils down to comparing six in one, and a half-dozen in another. Some manufacturers like Bowtech, Browning, Martin , PSE and a few others tend to design their bows to use solid limbs. Other manufacturers like Alpine, High Country, Pearson, and Reflex, mainly utilize split limb designs on their bows. A few manufacturers even mix it up and offer both. Solid limb proponents claim that solid limbs are more durable, offer better torsional stiffness, and are more accurate than split limbs. Split limb proponents claim that split limb bows are lighter, faster, and produce less hand-shock than solid limbs. While there may be some marginal or theoretical evidence to support each of these positions, in the real world, solid and split limb bows perform similarly. Whatever your preference, limb type should be a minor consideration compared to the other bow design characteristics we've discussed. Weigh this bow attribute lightly. Beyond the aesthetic appeal, it probably doesn't matter, as one type is likely to perform about as well as the other under most circumstances.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
72 Posts
I think it is personal preference. The major difference is in the tuning of the bow. I hunt with a friend that uses a split limb and it seems to take him longer to tune his than my solid limb. But that could be operator error.[grin]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
546 Posts
Just my 2 cents. Hunted a PSE for years -- solid limbs -- loved it. It was stolen out of truck along with other stuff. Shoped long and hard for a new bow. I went with hoyt -- split limb. Much lighter being a new bow but dont see or feel a diference in vibration. The hoyt shoots and feels awsome. If you choose a split limb, go with a laminated glass limb rather than a solid glass limb, much stronger. Good luck.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top