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I don't want to discourage you... it is not hard but there is more to it than most people expect.

8-10 ft. is extremely small except for very calm waters.

You may want to take a class first and then you will rip right through it.

e.g.... Building the Lumber Yard Skiff

Pls read the last paragraph. This is one of the easiest boats to build.

I would not use all lumberyard materials, spend extra for Meranti marine plywood like they suggest. Use marine fasteners. Your time is worth much more.

Old Wharf Dory Co: Fishing, Work and Pleasure Skiffs and Boats

Boatbuilding.net | Build a Lumberyard Skiff
 

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Some questions, before I am willing to make a recommendation. There are lots of projects that you can be proud of in the long run.

What is your wood working skills?

Do you have access to a band saw?

Do you have a table saw?

Do you want to build a boat that you and he can be proud of or something that he can dink around in for the next few years?

Where do you live? (i.e. picking up copies of plans, coming by and looking at a finished boat)

I built a Garvey designed plywood on oak frame pram that may be what you are looking for? I have a set of plans somewhere around here.
 

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Sorry if this sounds like 20 questions but. . .

OK so do you want to do you want to use oak frames, frames stringers, etc. or do you want do do one that is epoxy fillet construction?

Do you care if the boat is on the heavy side or do you want it to be light weight?

Do you always intend on rowing it or do you want a boat that you can throw (a) a small outboard on or (b) an electric motor?

How many people do you want to be able to take out in the boat?

How do you intend on getting the boat from your house to the water?

One boat that I built was an 8' Garvey Pram. It is kind of heavy but it is really stable. In theory you could make it using the tools you have but it would be much nicer if you had a buddy with a band saw for some of the cuts when you do the frames. You could do them with a jig saw but 2 hours with a band saw would make your life much easier. The cool part about this boat is that it fits in the bed of an 8' pickup truck with the tailgate up. The only modification that I made to the original design was to make the top streak an extra 4 inches wider to give it a little more free board. I used it for a tender for years and would take the wife me and two (sometimes three) kids 350 yards into the middle of the river to get to my sailboat.

This is the type of boat that I mean for the pram. Although mine is built with oak stringers, etc. Also mine is not rigged for sail. It would work with an electric motor or maybe a 2 hp outboard.



I also have a Gloucester Gull Dory, which although longer (15.5 feet), is a much nicer boat for two people to fish out of. It also rows better and can handle rough water (aka boat wakes) better than most boats out there. Here are a few photos that I found on the internet of one.





They came from this web site where there are more.

Gloucester Gull

I live across the M&M over in Poquoson if you want to come over and look at them. Actually if you came over on a pretty day you could take the dory out for a row as I live right down the road from a public boat landing.

Tom
 

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One very easy method is stich and glue.

Look through this website Bateau.com - boat plans on line since 1993. There are many small boats available and since you're logged on here, you're already familiar with "chat board" sites. The technical support on the Bateau site is EXCELLENT. I would dare say it is as good as Tidalfish, which in my opinion is second to none.

Building a small boat is not hard, however it can be more intensive than one might think.

One suggestion as Tom has already brought up, identify the intended purpose and function of the boat and go from ther.

Good luck, keep us posted.

Chris
 

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I'm pretty good with tools. I have jig saw table saws drills but no band saw.
I'm located in great Bridge, We want something to be proud of and usable too.:clap:
You can get by without a band saw. More on what Tom and Chris said... Think about what you want to do with the boat, where you will use it and designs that you like. Most plans will tell you what skill level is required. I have property that is off of a body of water that gets down to about 10 inches in many areas during low tide, is close to great crabbing waters and many protected rivers. I have a larger fishing boat but I can't get it into our area. So I looked at a lot of study plans and started focusing on the Simmons Sea Skiff 18 because it only draws 5 inches, does what I need it to do and has a great reputation down in the Carolinas. Then I ordered the plans for $40 and took a couple of classes. You can learn a great deal on the Internet and there are some books such as "Building Small Boats" available on Amazon.
 

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For more info, check out the "Getting Started in Boats" inserts from Wooden Boat magazine. These are inserts that have been in the Woodenboat Boat Mag for the last year or two. They describe in two or three pamphlets the contruction of a relatively simple boat. These are aimed at first time builders, including those interested in a first project with family members.

Here's the website with more info, including a free download of the first installment.

Getting Started in Boats

The latest one describes construction of a new design, a "Babson island 14", which is very simply built, but is particularly nice looking. It's available free here: http://www.woodenboat.com/wbmag/getting-started/pdf/GS13_NovDec08.pdf.

Focus of the series is simple, plywood based designs - mostly for rowing, but some have options for adding a centerboard and sail, or a small outboard.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Nice day

We got all the peices cut out and now we have started to glue it all to gether.
I've been taking pictures as we go and some day i'll learn how to post them.
My Grandson ( 9 ) :eek2: really getting excited now that the peices are coming together.
He's a little mess with the gluing but he the reason I'm doing it to start with. Nothing we can't sand out.
 

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A lot of these amateur boatbuilders take themselves too seriously. Essentially all you need is a circular saw, cordless drill, and a few basic hand tools. Just get started and have fun! It ain't a piano. Good luck.
Got it.

Garden Shed - 12 hrs.

18 ft. Skiff - 450 hrs. (plus circular saw and cordless drill)
 

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In college we built a 22' Roberts sail boat from plans. This was truly a labor of love for the guy that ended up completing the project(it was fiberglass). After this first boat you may want to build a slightly larger boat. I contacted Sarle's boat yard in annapolis 5 years ago and got a 14' wooden skiff from them. They are also knowledgeable about the building process. My 14' weighs about 220lb and I installed an 8 hp Nissan on it(57lb). The boat does 19mph by GPS with just me on board and sips gas. I use it in Chincoteague, Lewes Del. and the Wycomico(near Cobb Is). Your grandson will never forget this experience!
 
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