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With the additional information that has come forward, I agree completely. Killing for no good reason makes fishermen look really bad and it should.<o:p></o:p>
In this instance I might cut these fishermen a little slack. I can imagine the adrenaline and getting caught up in the moment, assuming that this was a first time for them and unexpected. While information about the value of sharks is spreading, I am confident that many folks still have no idea just how valuable they are and, thanks in part to Hollywood and a macho shark killing show that ran on a certain outdoor channel, might think of themselves as heroes for removing a "monster" like this from the Potomac (just look how much press they're getting).

I do like what I'm reading on this thread, however, which is a pretty unanimous view that these sharks should be released and valued alive. But based on what has been posted here, while I agree that it is a shame to see these sharks killed, this instance strikes me as being a lot different than if a seasoned offshore angler or charter targeted and kept sharks on a regular basis, and certainly not like the massive harm caused by commercial sharking operations.

Hopefully, these fishermen will learn about how this shark would have been better for the Bay if it was still eating rays and, if there is a next time, let the shark go.
 

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For the benefit of those who did not check out the article that Jeff posted, here is what was said about killing the shark.<?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:eek:ffice:eek:ffice" /><o:p></o:p>
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NBC News dubbed the incident: "Jaws in the Potomac" and played up the danger angle. But here's the irony. It's large sharks -- uncommon in the Chesapeake Bay -- that are much more in danger than the people who might come in contact with them. While shark attacks on humans are exceedingly rare, sharks are victims of severe overfishing up and down the Atlantic Coast.
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Bull shark populations declined more than 99 percent between 1970 and 2005 because of rising demand for shark fins (for soup) and meat, according to a report in the journal Science. The "declines in great sharks...imply their likely functional elimination," wrote biologist Ransom A. Myers and colleagues. And as shark populations have plummeted, numbers of cow-nose rays -- a favorite food of the sharks -- have skyrocketed, triggering a chain reaction in the Chesapeake Bay's chain of life. The theory is that not enough sharks means too many rays, and this translates to not enough oysters -- because rays love to gobble up oysters and disrupt oyster planting projects.<o:p></o:p>
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So, for the sequel, let's rewrite the plot and keep Jaws in the Potomac.<o:p></o:p>
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By Tom Pelton<o:p></o:p>
Chesapeake Bay Foundation<o:p></o:p>
 

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In this instance I might cut these fishermen a little slack. I can imagine the adrenaline and getting caught up in the moment, assuming that this was a first time for them and unexpected. While information about the value of sharks is spreading, I am confident that many folks still have no idea just how valuable they are and, thanks in part to Hollywood and a macho shark killing show that ran on a certain outdoor channel, might think of themselves as heroes for removing a "monster" like this from the Potomac (just look how much press they're getting).

I do like what I'm reading on this thread, however, which is a pretty unanimous view that these sharks should be released and valued alive. But based on what has been posted here, while I agree that it is a shame to see these sharks killed, this instance strikes me as being a lot different than if a seasoned offshore angler or charter targeted and kept sharks on a regular basis, and certainly not like the massive harm caused by commercial sharking operations.

Hopefully, these fishermen will learn about how this shark would have been better for the Bay if it was still eating rays and, if there is a next time, let the shark go.
Well said Goose........
 

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Well said Goose........
Exactly my thoughts. I can easily see myself getting all worked up, getting the shark in the boat (or tied alongside it) and then thinking "What do I do now?" or "Am I allowed to kill this beast?" or most likely in my case "Does this thing taste any good?"
 

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merogers and others who have little or no sharking experience-

A good place to start beefing up your knowledge of sharks you can visit Captain Mark Sampsons page- http://www.bigsharks.com/index.htm he is one of the best shark captains alive and understands much about the many different species. If you have not been shark fishing and wish to get into it you may consider one of his educational trips as he is a tremendous resource.

If you are going to be a good angler you should know what you are catching and which one's are worth killing and eating. If you are considering eating one you will not want to waste time dulling your knives on a Bull and do the right thing by releasing them. The small blacktip and duskies are not bad if quickly killed, gutted and put on ice as there bodies break down quickly giving off a strong amonia smell. The makos are "mackeral" sharks and for that reason they hold up well if kept cool and wet and as experienced sharkers know if you are going to eat shark the Makos and Threshers are very good but their numbers are also limited and serious consideration should be given to how much meat you can reasonably utilize before it gets freezer burn.

You can say what you want about being caught up in the moment but it does not help our cause as sportsman and I am glad to see that many understand the value of these fish alive. The Asians have committed tremendous abuses with finning and created a lucrative market for other countries to do the same to satisfy their desire for shark fin soup. As with Marlins and large Tuna these fish take many years to mature, take consideration of this before you decide to get out the gaff.

Personally I would rather dine on a Rockfish filet broiled with browned butter and fresh herbs.
 

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Thanks for the info, Capt. I have two questions: do you know any good source for light, succinct reading on commercial sharking in U.S. Atlantic coastal waters? CBF's figure of 99% reduction in Bull Sharks is alarming, to say the least. I'm wondering if the impact is more on Pacific (Asian) populations, or includes sharking closer to home.

Second, do you mind sharing that browned butter and herb rockfish recipe?
 

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Mark Sampson has a book called " Modern Sharking" that is a great read. I have fished with Mark many times and most sharks are caught, tagged and released. We have only kept one shark to eat which is an Atlantic Sharpnose. A bull shark is not table fare! You must be able to identify sharks well if you fish for them. Keeping the wrong shark could land you a BIG fine. Mark knows his stuff about sharks. He has a logbook of tagged sharks that have been found 1000 miles from where last caught. His boat is the Fish Finder out of OC fishing center. If you are interested in sharks, check him out!...........Gary
 

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In this instance I might cut these fishermen a little slack. I can imagine the adrenaline and getting caught up in the moment, assuming that this was a first time for them and unexpected. While information about the value of sharks is spreading, I am confident that many folks still have no idea just how valuable they are and, thanks in part to Hollywood and a macho shark killing show that ran on a certain outdoor channel, might think of themselves as heroes for removing a "monster" like this from the Potomac (just look how much press they're getting).

I do like what I'm reading on this thread, however, which is a pretty unanimous view that these sharks should be released and valued alive. But based on what has been posted here, while I agree that it is a shame to see these sharks killed, this instance strikes me as being a lot different than if a seasoned offshore angler or charter targeted and kept sharks on a regular basis, and certainly not like the massive harm caused by commercial sharking operations.

Hopefully, these fishermen will learn about how this shark would have been better for the Bay if it was still eating rays and, if there is a next time, let the shark go.
Before thinking about leniency, consider the history of the idiot that caught the shark: http://www.thebaynet.com/news/index.cfm/fa/viewstory/story_ID/11878
 

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lol i am never ever swimming in the bay again i think next time i go fishing goingto get some more fresh spots and see if i can hook some monster and get some good fights of them then. quess i need to sharpen my shark hook i still got in my tackle box and we do a leader for it.
 

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Today Willy and crew were helping the Solomon's biologists collect cow nosed rays and they got this 8' 1" Bull shark at Cornfield Harbor!!!!!!!!!! He called me to come take pictures and I GLADLY obliged!! I have never touched a shark before. This one felt like sandpaper. They got it right near where people swim down at the park so that is a little disconcerting. I wonder if he has any family still around? I have a lot more pictures I'll put up on our Buzz's brag board down here if anyone comes by. Michael was laughing. He thought he was "doing something" catching a cobia.... Christy
Yeah... the "Brag Board". Friends of yours?
 

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you all are absolutely nuts, who cares if they killed the shark or it was already dead, we are fishermen, thats what we do, kill things that swim. What is the difference when people go out on sharking trips hang a mako or a thresher back at the dock and every one says "wow good job, nice day", blah blah blah, or when someone puts together a nice limit of stripers everyone jumps on and says good work, but some scientist kill as described by them "the most dangerous shark in the world" a couple hundred yards from a swimming beach and you merries throw up your arms. Give me a break. I haven't been on this board in about 2 month, now I see why I stay away. Continue to pick and choose which species and which circumstances it is ok to kill animals and condemn the rest, what a joke
 

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Nemo... but you've got to admit the irony is not lost on you that (supposedly) they were working for DNR in the netting of destructive Skates (their increasing numbers blamed upon a drastic reduction of sharks) and they catch the shark after quite a fight, not retrieve it from a net. Not surprising, given the players involved.

On another front... do your travels bring you to the Port of Savannah? Would like to meet you, buy an adult beverage or three.
 

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That is very interesting. <?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:eek:ffice:eek:ffice" /><o:p></o:p>
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Who are Solomon's biologists? Are they working for the MD DNR. Why did they kill the shark? Does it have research value--food value? I thought there was a problem with too many rays because too many ray eating sharks had been killed. I thought it was supposed to be a good thing for the sharks to keep the ray population in check.<o:p></o:p>
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These are just questions, not a challenge to anyone.<o:p></o:p>
One thing for certain, Bull shark is not something anyone would eat unless they were starving to death!! I know, I tried it :(

Woody
 
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