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I'm looking for a new or used trailor and wonder which you guys think is better and why. The boat is 23 foot walkaround.
 

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I have a 23' WA and have a bunk trailer. It has composite bunks which makes it easy to get on an off because they are more slippery then carpet covered bunks. I would also put fore bunks on it. Once you put the bow in the fore bunks driving it on is a piece of cake.
 

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I can launch my boat or retrieve my boat in less than a minute with my bunk trailer.
 

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bunks all the way! rollers will not support your boat hull properly , at least thats what htye told me when i bought mine.
 

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I prefer a roller trailer. Easier to load and unload a cabin boat by myself (or just with my young son who is no help). When loading the boat, I can just bring to the rollers and winch up. I dont have to power load. I can also unwind the boat off the trailer. A roller trailer also is much less prohibative to what ramp you use. Shallow ramps or short ramps are much less of a problem for a roller trailer. Only advantage I see of a bunk is the better support against the hull. If you get a well made boat this shouldnt be an issue either.

BTW, I have a bunk trailer.
 

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I converted my bay jon bunk trailer to nylon rollers. I use a variety of shallow to steep ramps (or primitive ramps) where gravity and rolling action needs to be my friend...especially since I often launch solo, year round, day and night, blistering sun to icy snow. On a steep ramp watch out for runaway boats :D:yes: Guess it depends on the type of boat you have and the waters you frequent. Hope this helps.
 

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For heavy boats use bunks. My 25 contender has bunks bunks carry the weight better then rollers
 

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Bunks all the way. As others have said, drive on drive off. Also, lower center of gravity while towing. It's very easy to load and unload by youself.
 

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Some boats like the older Whalers suggest you support the boat by its Keel. Check to see what your boat’s manufacture recommends.
 

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I feel more secure with bunks. Just seems like if something went wrong a boat would have a better chance of staying on bunks. Hopefully a theory that I'll never test. I have only had a problem unloading my boat one time. I will say I have never had a roller trailer though.
 

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bunk. ever been to kiptopeake...very few use the center ramp. problem is on a crowded day and a line of boats waiting you never know who is willing to use the middle one. i suggested to park mgmt. they have two waiting lanes one for using the side ramps and the other for using the center only. fell on deaf ears.

suggestion: when you pay you money leave mgmt. a note to adopt the two waiting lanes.
it would speed everything up. next problem is vmrc and uscg board boats as they are pulled up to the level area of the ramp. causes major backups. i said something to vmrc......his response.... "none of my business". i said one more thing and i thought he was going to pull out the 9mm. idiots

get ready for the zoo
 

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Rollers if ya' launch at less than good ramps.Have to dis-agree with some of you Guys that say Bunk Trailers give better Hull support.IF,you have the PROPER Roller Trailer under your Boat and set-up properly.They have plenty of Hull support.

I had a 1979 Wellcraft Nova Off-Shore for 11 years.Had a Easy-Loader 64 Roller Trailer under it.ANY Roller on the Trailer could be turned by 2 hands WHILE the Boat was on it.Thats proper weight distribution!Also had a 21 Starcraft[Aluminum] with a Roller Trailer.I understand that Aluminum Hulls SHOULD have a Bunk Trailer.Never had any "Roller Dents or impressions" in that Hull.
 

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Like RLA69, I'm also starting to think about replacing my trailer (currently a roller trailer for a 23' cc), and I'm also trying to decide which type to go with.

Alot of responses say bunks are easy to powerload your boat. What about hand cranking a 23' boat onto a bunk trailer if you need to? Is it much different then hand cranking the boat onto a roller trailer?
 

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Like RLA69, I'm also starting to think about replacing my trailer (currently a roller trailer for a 23' cc), and I'm also trying to decide which type to go with.

Alot of responses say bunks are easy to powerload your boat. What about hand cranking a 23' boat onto a bunk trailer if you need to? Is it much different then hand cranking the boat onto a roller trailer?
This is why I think a roller trailer is better. retreiving a cabin boat solo makes for easier winching. I certainly dont want to have to drive on the trailer get out of the boat, hook the eye, get back on the boat, turn off and raise the motor, and then get off the boat again. With a roller trailer on my last boat I would just walk the bow to the rollers hook the eye and start winching. I can winch on my current bunk trailer but it takes dunking the trailer more and I have the teflon slick bunks. I also disagree that the boat sits lower on the trailer with bunks as my current bunk trailer has the boat sitting much higher than my previous roller. Of course my previous roller had torsion axle and not leaf springs like my current trailer. That has more to do with it than anything. Heck, due to having to dunk a bunk more I dont think I can use my short community ramp or a shallow sloping ramp that I used to use in NJ (without putting my truck tires in the salt water anyhow).. If someone gives me a good offer on my 7400lb load capacity bunk, I am going to buy a roller. :))
 

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This is why I think a roller trailer is better. retreiving a cabin boat solo makes for easier winching. I certainly dont want to have to drive on the trailer get out of the boat, hook the eye, get back on the boat, turn off and raise the motor, and then get off the boat again. With a roller trailer on my last boat I would just walk the bow to the rollers hook the eye and start winching. I can winch on my current bunk trailer but it takes dunking the trailer more and I have the teflon slick bunks. I also disagree that the boat sits lower on the trailer with bunks as my current bunk trailer has the boat sitting much higher than my previous roller.
You are truly confusing me. There is nothing less complicated that bunk trailer usage.

Bunk, Method 1. Back trailer to appropriate depth. Idle boat on, gently, til it sticks, stop motor, tilt, get out, attach winch strap, crank a few times if need be. Leave.

Bunk, Method 2. My solo method. Tie up boat, raise motor, back trailer to appropriate depth, untie boat and using bow line walk it up as far as possible (from dock/ramp, pretty far if you back in to the right depth), attach winch strap, crank a few turns. Leave

Roller, Method 1. Power load, hope it stays on, or leave in gear :eek: while you race around to connect winch strap.

Roller, Method 2. Leave in gear at back of trailer :eek:, get out, unwind a mile of winch cable, wade :eek::eek: out to bow, attach, winch up. I fail to see how one could hold the boat at the trailer and unwind/attach the winch strap by themselves and stay dry.
 

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I've got a 23ft WA and have a roller trailer. I haul her all over the place and support/stability is not an issue. The boat, fully loaded, weighs approx 4600lbs. Some of the ramps that I prefer to use don't have a steep grade so a roller for me was a must. I've only gone out by myself in the boat a few times and each time launch and recovery was a breeze for 1 person (although if I ever do it in winter, I will invest a few $$ in some waders to recover). Just my $0.02.
 

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I have a bunk trailer and like it.the key to loading and unloading is how far you back the trailer in.In my case that is the water level on the fenders of the trailer.Once I get the trailer set than I guide the boat between the poles ,jump on,put engine in gear and idle up to with in a few inches of the bow stop.Than walk up to the bow lean over the pulpit hook the strap ,make a few cranks .Then I walk back turn the engine off ,trim it up ,jump off the boat onto the dock and I`m done with no wet feet.
 

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FWIW: I've been trailering boats since I was 10 (with dad's help :D) and all have been roller trailers.Some ramps like Breezy Point can be tough to drive on at certain tide stages.At low tide on some ramps-you risk touching bottom with the lower unit :eek:.Some ramps do not allow power loading.

A roller trailer that is set up right with walk boards is easy to use.I often launch/retrieve my 27 footer alone.A good power winch makes it easy and it only takes about 4 minutes to load.I do not bury my trailer - I let the rollers do all the work.

Real key is buying a quality trailer with the right amount of rollers.IMHO - roller trailers can handle almost any ramp out there.

Not sure who says bunks offer better support - I have more square inch support with my rollers then two bunks could offer.A well built boat will not "sag" on a trailer - old wives tale.
 
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