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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Here are some carp flies that have been successful for me in the past couple years. These are mostly all tied on #6 bonefish hooks or #10 nymph hooks. I do not like any flash in my carp flies, I will even sharpie over bright bead chain eyes if I think they are spooking carp.

There are a lot of carp around where I fish and I always cast to them with little success. This first fly was originally designed for big sunfish, but it became my first consistant carp catcher. I tie it with lead and bead chain eye for different conditions. I have it in many colors, but natural hares ear with tan or black legs seems to be my best color.

Hook: size 10 standard nymph hook
Eyes: bead chain or lead dumbell eye
Legs, tail, antennae: spinnerbait skirt material. I tie this in first, 2 pieces along the shank as antennae and tail, then 2 more figure 8'd in the middle for legs.
Body: any dubbing, I use hare's mask for most, also fox squirrel body or red or gray fox.



This next fly is a great fly for duckpond carp. It looks just like a bread ball. It will sit just under the surface, and start to slowly sink. Just don't hook any ducks on it!

Hook: I used to tie this on size 10 nymph hooks. Now it is on a size 8 non-offset octopus hook
Body: white rabbit fur in a dubbing loop. Make a fur chinelle, and wrap to eye.

 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
These next two flies I just started fishing this year and have had good success with both.

The first is a variation of Brad Befus's wiggle bug. This is unweighted and is used for those stationary or slowly surface cruising carp. We used to throw to these fish, but rarely got a hit, except for in some ponds where they would take a bread fly. This year I have 6 fish on this fly, plus several largemouth. I cast it about a foot ahead of a stationary carp, or enough ahead of a cruiser to get it within a foot of it when it hits eye/mouth level. give it a few twitches and wait until the carp closes it's mouth after sucking it in.

Hook: any strong hook. I use a size 10 nymph hook or size 6 bonefish style
Tail, 2 thin strips of chamois, the type from the automotive section of walmart
body, hare's ear dubbing, but any dubbing would do. I like it to be pretty bushy. I just rib with the thread



This final pattern is taking the place of the first pattern for tailing fish. I think it will be my go to fly for feeding carp on the river, especially with the lead eyes. I saw a picture of the classic bonefish pattern, the pink feather shrimp, or something like that. I thought it would be a good carp pattern. I caught my first fish this year on a brown one. I think it does a good job of looking like a crayfish, and the hackles let it land softly in the water. Hook rides up to decrease snags

Hook: bonefish size 6
Eyes: either lead dumbell or bead chain. If I use lead eyes at the hook eye, I will sometimes also put bead chain at the bend of the hook, this is probably not neccesary.
Tail: fuzz from base of feather, or maribou
Body: webby hackly palmered the length of the shank. Clipped on bottom (top of hook)

 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Here is a pic of my carp box. All the flies on the right and bottom left are weighted and mostly used for feeding/tailing carp. The upper left are topwaters, slow sinkers, and miscellaneous carp flies. Extreme bottom left are tied on small jigs for deep fast water. Note the scuds, some streams have lots of scuds in the grass and the carp (and big 'gills) eat em up!



Here's the result. This is an average size fish from one of the ponds we fish. This was on the 2 wt with one of the modified wiggle bugs. This carp and another were slowly cruising about 20 feet off the bank. My buddy had first shot, but missed the cast. My turn put the fly perfectly in front of the lead fish.

 

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Thanks for this thread - I tried casting to some carp that were cruising on the upper patapsco / belle grove ponds area last spring with my 6 wt, but didn't have any takers.

I thought I read somewhere about casting right behind their "ear" (if you will) when they are stirring up the mud... looks to them like something trying to escape that they just unsettled from the sediment.

The flies I have, which a friend graciously tied for me, look most like the flies in the first picture.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Josh. I think that if they are mudding and you cast behind the ear, they wont see it. I like to put it right on their nose or a few inches in front of it if they are moving forward. I used to fish patterns that were the same color as the bottom, as most bonefish fishers suggest, but I think the carp make more of a mud cloud. I started using more black for mudding fish and think the carp can see it better in the muddy water.
 

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If they are mudding, don't cast to the mud, but look for air bubbles rising to the surface, and also watch to see witch direction they are moving. Then cast a foot or so in fron of the air bubble to get your fly to sink a bit, one or two quick hopping little strips, and hope that they see it...
 
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