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:rockon: Catch and Release will become a way of life/fishing for most of us.

I have been seeing a lot of posts & pics of really big fish hanging from a Boca Grip!

We had all better learn proper release techniques for these fish or we will be defeating the reason we are trying to save & releasing these big fish.. to have more babies!
Hanging from a boca or the lips has got to hurt these big Momma's.. besides being netted and dropped onboard a few times!

:clap: Great to take a few shots with the kids and family and then go braggin'
Thats what its all about!

This is not a Rec Fisherman or a Charter Boat issue.. Its for all of us to do the right way.

Learn how to Release'm & Treat'em good for another day!!!

 

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So, I am all for the proper handling of fish while performing catch and release and practice proper handling of fish everytime I am performing catch and release.

But, help me understand how the proper usage of a boga grip to handle and weight a fish causes more trauma to the fish than pulling the fish (let's say a 40" + hog) through the water at 2.8 to 3 Mph on 80 Lb test line for the amount of time it takes to reel in 150 to 200 feet of line and then net the fish (disturbing it's slime layer) and possibly ending up with a tangled mess of net that potentially can take several minutes to subdue the fish, remove the hook and remove it from the net. Oh, then it's time for a photo.

We have all seen the spinners (fish that spiral in), the foul hooked draggers and the double hook ups that seem to take forever to land. The fish just had a huge hook in its jaw and was dragged through the water at 3 mph in one direction while the fish was fighting trying to go the other direction.

When I use a boga grip it takes seconds to subdue the fish, remove the hook, and release the fish back into the water. If I do snap a photo I do support the fish by it's belly and hold it horizontal. Hanging the fish vertically, out of water, can do damage to the fish. If you use a boga grip, make sure you are using it properly and do not lot the full weight of a large fish hang by the boga grip alone. Support the fish horizonally while snapping that picture. :rockingman2:
 

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This is from the VMRC web site.

Handling and Releasing Fish.

1. Plan ahead. Minimize stress and exhaustion by using tackle strong enough to land fish quickly. Set hooks quickly to minimize the opportunity for fish to swallow hooks and avoid the use of treble hooks. When practical, bend down the barbs on hooks or use barbless hooks. When using bait consider the use of circle hooks, which minimize the possibility of "deep-hooking" fish.

2. Minimize the handling of fish, and do not touch the eyes or gills. Large fish are best released by leaving them in the water and removing the hooks. Small fish should be brought on board and handled with a damp towel or damp cotton gloves, which will minimize damage to the fish's skin and protective slime coating. Control the fish, gently but firmly, so it cannot "flop" around and cause itself any further injury. Do not use a gaff to boat large fish; consider using a large net.

3. Use the right tools to remove the hooks. Needlenose pliers work well for fish hooked in the mouth, while a deep-throat dehooker or disgorger should be used for fish hooked deeply in the throat. Cut the leader close to the fish's mouth for fish hooked deeply in soft tissue areas (stomach, eg.) or if hook removal is not possible. Never pull or jerk on the leader to remove a hook.

4. Release fish gently, and if the fish is stressed or exhausted, revive it by gently moving it forward through the water until it is able to swim off.
 

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Just let go at boat side without removing them from the water.Save the camara for birthday partys or the ones your gonna keep.
 

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No reason to net rockfish you plan to release.Most of the "mistakes" are made by new fisherman.Take the time to explain the proper way to release a fish to new guys.We will all benefit from this.Biggest tip is to get them back into the water in 30 seconds or less.With practice you can do it in 20 seconds or less. Skip
 

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I agree with Moutauk 17; not one good thing can happen to a rockfish no matter how carefully he/she is handled. Hook in mouth at 2.8 knots, Dragging through water for "x" number of minutes, Lifted out of water (net or no net), Human hands on scales ( removing protective slime) Thrown back into the water (no matter how carefully). Added to the stress factor that these are pregnant and/or horney fish (or perhaps post-delivery);catch and release, they could do without.
How about we (Bay Fisherman/fisherwoman) let our beloved rockfish have a free reign of the Bay until our season opens on April 21st.Because of the new regs, I'm sure we can all practice catch and release at that time.
Just my thoughts.

M. Fish
 

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I,ve never used a boga grip, so I can,t comment on that, but I think its O.K. to take the fish out of the water for a short time. I have everything ready before the fish is even hooked up. camera, hook remover, ect... then when I have the fish boated, hold the fish with my thumb in its mouth (holding down the tongue) and the fingers uder the outside of the mouth, then I remove the hook and put the other hand on the bottom of the fish, just behind the belly for support. then I take the pic and quikly release it. the fish shouldn,t be out of the water much longer then 30 seconds, maybe even shorter when the water is warmer.
 

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"Hanging from a boca or the lips has got to hurt these big Momma's.."

There's no evidence that using a Boga on rockfish injures them. If you find a study on rockfish that shows otherwise, I'd be very interested.

We release the vast majority boat side. If you want a picture, Zam is holding that fish properly. There's nothing wrong with that sort of treatment when the air temp is cool.
 

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I have no idea if a boga does or does not hurt the fish. I know a lot of people think it does, along with any type of vertical hold of the fish (especially big fish). So with that in mind I personally don't use one. If I really want to weigh a fish these days (and still release them) I weigh them in the net and subtract off the weight of the net. I don't need to be that precise for my own records and I am sure it is within a few tenths of a pound anyway. I do this so that fish's body is supported by more than just its jaw or gill plates.
 

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Doesn't a net pull the slime off of the fish. I noticed that my father got a soft rubber net. Do you think that will prevent the slime from being pulled off. I don't particulaly understand the point in CnR by trolling before the season, unless your just doing it once or twice to get your spread right. Light tackle is the only reason I do it and if I find out that I am killing fish when I do this. Leaving them in the water is by far the best way to go.
 

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Nets can pull the slime off a fish.The slime protects fish from infections-think of a human's skin scrapped off.Rubber nets are better but it's best to avoid any type of net.

Trolling or light tackle-that's a touchy subject.I like to get fish in quick.IMHO-fighting a big fish on light gear wears them out.I've seen guides use tackle so light for 30 lbers that I cringe.Fighting a fish for 15 minutes can't be good for the fish.

Plus side is the cool water temps. and more fisherman being much more careful in the handling of these big fish.

Tag returns prove my fish live through our C/R.I just use common sense and strive to get them back into the water in 30 seconds. Skip
 

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Another question Skip. Don't know if you do or don't use downriggers, but if you do and you hook a fish that was really deep do you take your time bringing them in (I'm not sure if that even matters, doesn't the boat moving more or less force them up kind of quick)?

When I've used downriggers (this was on a charter) on the great lakes and we've brought in Steelhead or walleye from real deep the fish was basically DOA (depth of these fish was probably 50-60+ft). In these cases we were keeping the fish and it wasn't necessarily all of them, but it did happen pretty often. Don't know maybe the bigger stripers aren't as susceptible?
 
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