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The Chesapeake Bay Foundation is suing the EPA for its second missed deadline. The first was in 2000 and they have now said the extension granted to meet the requirements by 2010, will now be missed and they want to extend again to 2020.

Hmmmmmmm

Gov't garbage. Oh boohoohooo, don't hurt the landowner but screw the bay and everbody that uses it.

Chris
 

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It is just amazing to me that people still think that the Bay's problems can be addressed by targeting only the farmers, corporations and landowners (septics) when the real polluter is the government itself. How about suing Annapolis, Severna Park, Baltimore and all the cities and towns in the watershed when their pipes break dumping millions of gallons of raw sewage into the Bay. Or, how about an Exxon Valdez size penalty against any local government for antiquated or inefficient sewage treatment plants. How about gettng the US Governement waste cleaned out of the Bay. A few big settlements against say, Baltimore City, forcing higher taxes and bad publicity, will greatly impact the Bay's water quality.

Why is this all ignored? Simple, environmental groups believe that government is the solution to the problem not the cause. Many of them survive on government funding and will not act to address the real cause of the Bay's problems. Clean up the Bay and they put themselves out of business. So, the paper has it right... money and time does not equal improvement to the Bay.

Solution: Encourage the environmental groups to expand their leadership to include qualified people of other political ideologies and attack the root cause of the Bay's problem with a unbiased vengence.

Conclusion: The current environmentalists are all of the same confined ilk, clearly making them impotent in ever improving the Chesapeake Bay.

Sorry, just a reality check for the readers.
 

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They need to also target the trash incinerator located in the patapsco. U might see the big building next to I-95 that has BALTIMORE wrote on it. You oughta see the trash that escapes that place. We crabbed near the head waters one day this past summer only to lose the cage floats in the floating debris. All it took was a good wind.
 

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It is just amazing to me that people still think that the Bay's problems can be addressed by targeting only the farmers, corporations and landowners (septics) when the real polluter is the government itself. How about suing Annapolis, Severna Park, Baltimore and all the cities and towns in the watershed when their pipes break dumping millions of gallons of raw sewage into the Bay. Or, how about an Exxon Valdez size penalty against any local government for antiquated or inefficient sewage treatment plants. How about gettng the US Governement waste cleaned out of the Bay. A few big settlements against say, Baltimore City, forcing higher taxes and bad publicity, will greatly impact the Bay's water quality.

Why is this all ignored? Simple, environmental groups believe that government is the solution to the problem not the cause. Many of them survive on government funding and will not act to address the real cause of the Bay's problems. Clean up the Bay and they put themselves out of business. So, the paper has it right... money and time does not equal improvement to the Bay.

Solution: Encourage the environmental groups to expand their leadership to include qualified people of other political ideologies and attack the root cause of the Bay's problem with a unbiased vengence.

Conclusion: The current environmentalists are all of the same confined ilk, clearly making them impotent in ever improving the Chesapeake Bay.

Sorry, just a reality check for the readers.
CBF and others are suing the EPA. I guess that these environmentalist are not "of the same confined ilk." Many of the so-called "governments" that you list are not actual entities that can be sued (e.g.- no such thing as the government of Severna Park). Many wastewater treatment facilities are privately owned. Many, many others are individually owned septic systems; these systems add a very large percentage of the nitrogen pollution in some areas of the Bay (such systems do nothing to stop nitrogen pollution and their effluent forms the majority of the base flow for streams in some watersheds). Here's another reality check: Exxon Valdeze-size fines are all well and good....so long as you, the taxapayer, are willing to pony up 3, 4 or 5x your current tax contribution to pay off the judgment. Unlike the feds, local governments can't simply print money to solve problems. They need you, the taxpayer, to fund them. The simple math, even after talking about "cutting waste" in government spending, is that the money is not there....not nearly.
 

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[QUOTE=Greyghost;1244472]It is just amazing to me that people still think that the Bay's problems can be addressed by targeting only the farmers, corporations and landowners (septics) when the real polluter is the government itself. How about suing Annapolis, Severna Park, Baltimore and all the cities and towns in the watershed when their pipes break dumping millions of gallons of raw sewage into the Bay. Or, how about an Exxon Valdez size penalty against any local government for antiquated or inefficient sewage treatment plants. How about gettng the US Governement waste cleaned out of the Bay. A few big settlements against say, Baltimore City, forcing higher taxes and bad publicity, will greatly impact the Bay's water quality.

Why is this all ignored? Simple, environmental groups believe that government is the solution to the problem not the cause. Many of them survive on government funding and will not act to address the real cause of the Bay's problems. Clean up the Bay and they put themselves out of business. So, the paper has it right... money and time does not equal improvement to the Bay.


Evidently you didn't read the article very closely, nor are you up to date on point vs. non-point pollution entering the bay. In fact, municipalities have been the lone source of pollution to significantly clean up their act. Waste treatment plants are actually an example of where strides have been made, and everyone from government entities to enviros agree on that one area of success. Non-point source pollution (that coming from multiple, hard to identify sources, such as individual septic systems, farms, and yes boats too, etc.) is much harder to tackle since there's no one place/entity to address.
RE: "Forcing higher taxes..."
Have you ever heard of the Flush Tax?
Sounds to me like you're more interested in finding a reason to bash the govenrment (like there aren't enough already???) then finding a real solution to the problems facing the bay.
 
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