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My Clymer manual just spent a month in a box with an inch of water in it, which did not help the manual at all. It may not be a total loss, but it sure won't be much good.

If I buy a new one, should I consider getting a Seloc manual? The Clymer manual came with the boat when I bought it, so it has been the only manual I've ever used. I certainly don't do any heavy duty engine repairs, but I try hard to to everything I can. I've been underwhelmed with the Clymer manual. Does anyone have any recommendations?

As you are all Tidal Fishers I'm SURE someone will have an opinion or 3. [grin]

For what its worth, I have a 93/94 OMC Cobra (I say 93/94 because it is a bit of a transition model...more '94 but technically a '93) with a Ford 5L (302) engine.
 

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Have usually heard that Seloc is a bit better than Clymer, but can't recall why.

The Clymer is quite generic, but I presume you already know that. In my opinion, a person needs to be somewhat already mechanically inclined/experienced to get by with it, so the Clymer only rates a slight ok by me. Even at that, I find myself questioning its content at times.

Still, I wish I had a model specific OEM manual around.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I fully agree with the comment that Clymer is generic. And the OMC-specific sections are pretty weak. The OMC photos often remind me more of a snapshot rathen than a photo taken for a tech manual. I was leaning towards the Seloc, just because I haven't been disappointed by it...perhaps because I have never held one in my hands to read. The devil you know often makes anything else sound good.

Question about the OEM manuals: there are some available on EBay among others. I am not sure I'm reading them right though. Is there actually a whole series of manuals I'd have to buy (invest in?), including separate manuals for: fuel system, electrical/electric, engine service, EFI diagnostic, etc.? Or is there a single basically comprehensive manual? What would it be called?
 

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I can only answer for my brand outboard, which is a Yamaha. It has a single OEM Repair Manual, though I don't know its contents. In the case of my Yamaha, I can go online to their parts catalog, and everything is included from the control box, back to the engine, and also the tilt/trim assembly. I can only presume it's all covered in their OEM manual also.

Maybe owners of engines made by other mfgrs can offer more help than this.
 

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I know the most recent BRP manuals are model specific for a given year. Way back including 1985 model, the OMC outboard manuals were also model and year specific. Before that time, not sure when though, OMC produced a single manual for all models per year. I/O's may have been treated somewhat differently, however. I'm sure a call to BRP customer service could clear up any uncertainty, even if they don't provide manuals that far back.
 

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Maybe manufacturer dependent but here's my impression.

When I bought my Merc the guy gave me a Clymer manual. It covered a lot of procedure sand is adequate for everyday type repairs but is weak on details. When it came time to rebuild my trim assembly I ended up going out and buying a Seloc because of the details it went into on that particular part. Overall I believe the Seloc is a better overall manual for really getting into things.

On the other hand, when I purchased the new boat I needed a manual for an Evinrude so I ordered a factory manual. I hate to say it but the Seloc is a lot easier to follow and contains a lot more generalized information. You also have to buy a factory parts and an accessories manual if you really want to get into something. It gets expensive.

On top of it the factory manuals are hard to follow. A lot of knowledge is taken for granted and not spilled out in the text. It’s pack full of good technical information but if you’re looking for a good step by step procedural manual the factory offering is not the one for you.
 

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I find that each contains something the other one doesn't. This is either in the way they present the material or the items covered. Therefore, for my boat I have both!! [excited]
 

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Funny Sandtiger, I was just thinking the same thing.

Seahunter, in your experience, does that impression go across the board for ALL marine manufacturers' motor repair manuals?

It's my belief, generally speaking, that some Repair Manuals (no matter what the product is that you're fixing) can be presented in such a way that it takes more than just mechanical ability to understand - like hands-on training, or perhaps even some prior experience specific to the item being repaired.

Just curious if you think that holds true across ALL marine OEM motor manuals. Thanks.

Oops, edited to say I reread your post more carefully, and noticed you said, "Maybe manufacturer dependent....."
 

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[Q]Seahunter originally wrote:
Maybe manufacturer dependent but here's my impression.

When I bought my Merc the guy gave me a Clymer manual. It covered a lot of procedure sand is adequate for everyday type repairs but is weak on details. When it came time to rebuild my trim assembly I ended up going out and buying a Seloc because of the details it went into on that particular part. Overall I believe the Seloc is a better overall manual for really getting into things.

On the other hand, when I purchased the new boat I needed a manual for an Evinrude so I ordered a factory manual. I hate to say it but the Seloc is a lot easier to follow and contains a lot more generalized information. You also have to buy a factory parts and an accessories manual if you really want to get into something. It gets expensive.

On top of it the factory manuals are hard to follow. A lot of knowledge is taken for granted and not spilled out in the text. It's pack full of good technical information but if you're looking for a good step by step procedural manual the factory offering is not the one for you.

[/Q]

"Hard to follow ..." This is news to me. I've never heard anyone suggest third party manuals are EVER better than OEM, but I haven't used the Jap manuals, other than Tohatsu, so I can't speak for all. Merc, Force (Chrysler), BRP (OMC) are all great and WAY superior to any third party manuals, but if the user doesn't know simple procedures, they don't come with training wheels. I'll take an OEM manual any day. BTW, Merc, BRP and Yamaha all have complete parts list available on-line, so you don't need to buy that piece. Typically, where the third party manuals fall down is in the area of very model specific information and special tools needed. Most of the OEM books have three or four view PH pictures, with all components labeled, complete wiring diagrams for the specific motor you working on, etc., etc.

Try to do a complete PH or LU rebuild with a third party book sometime to fully understand the difference in manuals!
 

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I have used this company in the past for OEM manuals. The one I bought some years back was not available thru the manufacturer, but this company had it.

http://www.kencook.com/evinrudejohnsonmanuals/index.cfm?fuseaction=home.main
 
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