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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Every time I read on here about people applying de-tangler and carefully combing out their parachute lure hairs, I get the visual of a grown man combing out the pretty mane on his My Little Pony doll, and I have to wonder whether these prehistoric fish we're targeting, with their pea-sized brains, are able to make any distinction whatsoever between a chute that's combed and one that's not. Face it, even though modern rubber shad molds we're using today are better than they've ever been; with the 50lb mono leader, the 8oz lead head, and the flowing mane, the lures we're pulling really don't look a whole lot like a real shad. And the de-tangler? WTF? Wouldn't that leave an oily scent trail that's nothing like the natural stank of a menhaden?

I tend to think that these fish are pretty damn stupid, and that they're opportunistic sight feeders that will attack anything that remotely resembles a baitfish. I'll grant you that color matters, and I'll admit that I believe that the presence of an "eye" makes a difference, but except for the worst cases of knotted, clumpy hair that's enough to take the lure off track, I can't imagine that combing the hair makes any difference.

Should I embrace my inner Brony? Maybe get myself a My Size Barbie to practice up on?

What say you, gentlemen of Tidalfish ?
 

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HAHAHA!!!! Great post.. I too take special care to comb my rigs hair out. I don't use de-tangler.. Hot water and a firm bristled hair brush works just fine for me. Once dry I comb them again to smooth out the hair and make it look nice.

As my wife says to me when I go down to my work room to work on them "Are you going to play with your Trolls???" She thinks it creepy!

We work so hard to get out there, invest thousands of dollars in boats, gear, etc. and to not comb them out and make the presentation as best as possible is dangerous and a sure way to not catch a fish. Its a small price to pay to make sure we're successful in our sick little hobby that we call fishing.

I say embrace your inner Brony and go with it! Good luck out there! We're a week away!!!

Brian S.
 

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I think its alot more to do with satisfying your own standard.You want to have 100% confidence in every bait you set out.Im the same way tuna fishing,everything gets combed everything gets pretty and when im 100% confident in a bait,swims right looks right,out it goes.And confidence goes a long way instead of constant second guessing.
 

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My reason behind combing is to make sure the lure runs straight like you were saying and also when the hair is combed with no clumps it pulses and flutters when going through the water so the more neatly the hair is combed the more action the lure has. Whether that makes a difference or not.... Everyone has there own option but you gotta go with whatever makes you confident..
 

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I'll admit it can get a touch queer eye for straight guy but combing parachute hair really ups the catch ratio.

I saw a guy in Wal mart looking through detanglers few Aprils ago. He had on a MSSA tournament shirt and was bald. I teased him - You going fishing ?

He laughed - said sure isn't for my hair.

I know it can be tough to find the right combs / brushes around this time of year - so must be a lot of guys combing the lures out.
 

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combing chutes

:yes:
Every time I read on here about people applying de-tangler and carefully combing out their parachute lure hairs, I get the visual of a grown man combing out the pretty mane on his My Little Pony doll, and I have to wonder whether these prehistoric fish we're targeting, with their pea-sized brains, are able to make any distinction whatsoever between a chute that's combed and one that's not. Face it, even though modern rubber shad molds we're using today are better than they've ever been; with the 50lb mono leader, the 8oz lead head, and the flowing mane, the lures we're pulling really don't look a whole lot like a real shad. And the de-tangler? WTF? Wouldn't that leave an oily scent trail that's nothing like the natural stank of a menhaden?

I tend to think that these fish are pretty damn stupid, and that they're opportunistic sight feeders that will attack anything that remotely resembles a baitfish. I'll grant you that color matters, and I'll admit that I believe that the presence of an "eye" makes a difference, but except for the worst cases of knotted, clumpy hair that's enough to take the lure off track, I can't imagine that combing the hair makes any difference.

Should I embrace my inner Brony? Maybe get myself a My Size Barbie to practice up on?

What say you, gentlemen of Tidalfish ?
 

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We carry a bucket of clean water with dish soap in the bucket and everytime we pull the lines in we dump in water and rince and come out anything we have snagged like jellies and the dirt coming from up the bay after the April rains. If you have fished the trophy season you know what I'm talking about.
 

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Every time I read on here about people applying de-tangler and carefully combing out their parachute lure hairs, I get the visual of a grown man combing out the pretty mane on his My Little Pony doll, and I have to wonder whether these prehistoric fish we're targeting, with their pea-sized brains, are able to make any distinction whatsoever between a chute that's combed and one that's not. Face it, even though modern rubber shad molds we're using today are better than they've ever been; with the 50lb mono leader, the 8oz lead head, and the flowing mane, the lures we're pulling really don't look a whole lot like a real shad. And the de-tangler? WTF? Wouldn't that leave an oily scent trail that's nothing like the natural stank of a menhaden?

I tend to think that these fish are pretty damn stupid, and that they're opportunistic sight feeders that will attack anything that remotely resembles a baitfish. I'll grant you that color matters, and I'll admit that I believe that the presence of an "eye" makes a difference, but except for the worst cases of knotted, clumpy hair that's enough to take the lure off track, I can't imagine that combing the hair makes any difference.

Should I embrace my inner Brony? Maybe get myself a My Size Barbie to practice up on?

What say you, gentlemen of Tidalfish ?
Let's test it out. I'll comb out the chutes and you don't comb all trophy season:)
5th
 

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We carry a bucket of clean water with dish soap in the bucket and everytime we pull the lines in we dump in water and rince and come out anything we have snagged like jellies and the dirt coming from up the bay after the April rains. If you have fished the trophy season you know what I'm talking about.

X2
 

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Just got back from putting stuff on my boat. A jug of softener was placed under the gunwale today even before I saw this thread.

20150419_133412.jpg
 

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when my parachutes start getting so they don't swim or look good I take them to George at tylers tackle and he puts new hair on them for 2.50 to 3.00 each plus he will replace eyes for .75 a set
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Some interesting arguments here. 'You've invested so much time, money and effort, why would you pull up short at the end..." is reasonable, It's why you straighten your tie or hitch up your britches on the way into a job interview.

I still think that in murky water with 1.5' visibility, the fish isn't going to stop and say "holy ****, that thing's got bed head!" We put the hook in the trailer on an umbrella because we know that predators go after the weak and the injured. Why not let the tangled locks make it weave and bob like a differently-abled alewive?

To each his own. As far as I can tell, it's mostly about being out there when the fish are, and getting a lure in their face when they're hungry.
 

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I belive in combing, especially when there is a lot of snot in the water. I would think making your lure smell like fabric softener or detangler would lower your catch
 

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Zags always expects us to comb the parachutes and keep them pretty. From my over analytical fishing mind, I think a non-combed skirt with tangles can possibly minimize the amount of hook gap exposed-less likely to hook a fish- and perhaps ruin the intended action of the set-up.

Is a 10 second task worth skipping that may result in fish not caught?
 

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I belive in combing, especially when there is a lot of snot in the water. I would think making your lure smell like fabric softener or detangler would lower your catch
I would have thought so also. But I saw a very successful charter boat doing it so I gave it a try. The lures are rinsed well afterward and the rockfish absolutely do not hesitate to hit them. The conditioner sure makes combing a lot easier.
 

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Maybe a little scent serves as an attractant just like gulp, garlic dyes, and the tons of other spray on attractants on the market. West coast fisherman have used a "super secret" scent for years (spraying lures with WD-40).
 

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I find the chutes run better when combed out. I comb and clean them on each pull.
Might try using bunker oil in the dip. Maybe the smell will help.
But i know combing and cleaning definitely works for me.
 

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I run 15 rods at an average of $20.00 for a set of tandums I will be trolling approx. $300.00 in lures, yes I spend the time to comb them out using bleach white, and then dip them in a fabric softner rinse.
 
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