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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I asked a question on another thread about reels , so the question was raised about using a spinning or conventonial reel for flounder fishing and jiggig for stripers . I want to buy a decent reel and always used spinning, so the question is what do you use and why should i make the move to conventional.
 

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Flounder fishing? I always use a conventional reel. When drifting, I want to be in free spool with thumb on the spool and pay out line as I feel the weight of the fish. When time seems about right, put it in gear and raise the rod to set the hook.
 

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If you like spinning reels, several spinning reels manufactures make spinning reels with bait runner features, such as Okuma reels. These have two separate drag systems. The back drag allows you to fish bait and set the drag so that the fish can pick up the bait and move with little resistance. When you turn the handle the reel disengages the bait runner and you fight the fish on the front drag system. These are great reels if you want a multipurpose reel for different applications. One of the Chesapeake guides recommended Okuma reels several years ago in a striper seminar that I attended, I have several with the bait runners and they are great reels.
 

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Conventional all the way. You don't have to be a great caster to use a conventional vertical jigging outfit and the benefits far outweigh the cons, as mentioned above. Bass Pro Shops Pro Qualifier is a nice cheapo low profile. They'll be on sale in Feb for their big sales event around 70-80 bucks.

I have an Okuma Avenger baitrunner styled spinner and use it from time to time. For under 50 bucks its a great buy. Alltackle turned me on to them over 4 years ago and its still running strong. Only drawback is the large bail will bang your fingers if you aren't careful when reeling.
 

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for flounder fishing along the coast, I have had a Penn 965 for a number of years and it is my favorite reel for the task. it is good for bottom bouncing the the flounder rig or bucktail off the bottom and I can thumb the spool off of shoals and lumps or around structure like a wreck and quickly hold bottom.
 

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BOTH

nah nah nah. Now perry, listen... you need some of each. no but really, but for the money, try to stick with shimano and st. croix and you can't go wrong. everyone needs round reels in their arsenal as well as spinning. I recommend one of these. tell the wife the credit card was stolen or something like that.:cool:
 

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I use both, but 99% of the time my spinning reel sits in the rod holder and i pick it up when the fish hooks itself. With a spinning reel you just don't have enough time to drop it back if you swing and miss.

I been using a spro bucktail on a custom trigger stick with an ambassadeur 6500 spooled with braid. just like Terp says, keep it in free spool, thumb on the reel, if you miss drop it right back down and he'll go after it again.

gawd i love flounder fishing...................
 

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Started using a baitcaster when we used to top water for bluefish at Hacket's, TP, Greenbury Point etc when the big ones showed up in May. Using the thumb to apply pressure to help with additional drag to slow a run. Boy I miss those days. 10 to 20 lb blue in shallow water on an Atom plug, 14lb test. fibreglass rod.. As good as it gets.

I bought a Abu Record when they first came out and love it. Went with Walleye to CCNPP to jig. He said that the baitcaster would not allow the line to drop fast enough and that we would be out of the strike zone before the lure got down there. The Record reel peels line off faster then any other baitcaster that I have. I had no problems catching stripers that day. In addition the reel casts beatifully and far. I use baitcasters on my surf reels too. Easier on the arms retreiving those big pyramids as they drag throught the sand.

I've always felt that a baitcaster allows for more control fighting a fish. As far as letting line out when drifting for flounder I find the Shimano Baitrunner to be fine. I have a Shimano Baitrunner Plus. This is the eqivalent to a lever drag conventional reel. Does anyone else use the Plus? It's pretty old and they didn't make it to long.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
okay , going to buy a shimano Cardiff reel 400 series .( from the local tackle shop guy) he said to buy the 400 for the clicker.the 300 doesnt have the clicker, any body have any advice on this reel . it will be my first baitcaster reel. i understand the pluses on flounder fishing with being able to drop the line back down when missing a strike ,but what will i be gaining with casting say like on the flats compared to a spinning setup , he is setting me up with a 7 ft medium heavy shimano rod, not sure i need something quite that heavy ?? thanks again
 

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Eminent Brother,
I used to say spin reels are only good for casting ultra lite lures and beginning fisherman. Stole that off of Gizmo. Most of the flounder guys I know use baitcasters for flounder so they can thumb the spool. For striper jigging I've thrown in the towel and have to agree a spin reel works better for me at the CCNPP then my manly man baitcasters. And I use a spin reel when casting into the wind or fishing a piling in current where you have to get deep and get deep fast before the curent carries your bait away. For me there is a stigma associated with spin reels because if I was any good......I'd be using a baitcaster to jig for stripers like I used to do and Brother Kimbro does now.
 

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For Flounder you definitly want conventional. For jigging I personally like spinning lots more, but that's just me and I have been outfished by people with convnetional outfits and I have outfished people with conventional outfits. If you're only buying one I say conventional, but, you really do need both.

Personally I like the Penn 965/975's as well.
 

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Skip the Cardiff and grab a Penn 525 while they last. 99 bucks and a MUCH better reel. They are replacing the 525 with a new reel called the Squall.
I've had a Cardiff and its no where near the Penn.
 

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The thing with conventional reels for me is the release to free spool. Some won't release when ya push the button if your dragging weight with out pump'n the rod to get the pressure off. Sometimes like over Delaware when your drift'n with a good tide and a tail wind your drift'n 6knts or so in 50ft of water, your using maybe 6-8 oz to hold bottom and not let your line pass 45 degrees. Dragging that much weight, when ya hit the button the reel won't disengage to free spool so you can drop back to a bite and at that speed if ya don't drop back quick enough ya miss your chance while your pumping to free-spool. I'm using Abu c-4's. Their bout the cheapest I've found that work for me. To each his own though, JMHO.
 

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For drifting I like the Avet SX.The first stop on the lever puts a slight bit of presser on the spool which is nice on a long flat bottom.In free spool just use your thumb and when you get a pick up let him or her go a bit then slam the lever home while lifting the rod tip.This also a great reel for the big boys or girls down at the CBBT.
 

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I also say skip the Cardiff. I had one and now use either a Calcutta 201 for the flounder fishing with lighter weights (Wachapreague) and an Abu Records RCN61 HC in deeper water with more weight.

Also, there's some good video on youtube about flounder jigging with conventional outfits using spro bucktails:
 
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