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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am a member/subsrciber to Waterfowler.com, each quarter we recieve a magazine. This quarters publication had an article titled BLUE GREEN ALGAE..."The danger of Cyanophytes". The article went on to illustrate the dangers of two types of toxins; a potent neuro toxin as well as a less DEADLY hepato toxin. Depending on the exposure and type of toxin sysmptoms can range form liver bleeding, muslce spasms, irregular braeathing, diarrhea, vomitting, lethargy, abdominal discomfort and fluid and death. All warm blooded animals are susceptible to these toxins, including people. Addiotnally, a dog can get infected by simply licking his coat after a spalsh in a contaminated pond. The article went on to talk about how the author's DOG DIED WITHIN 3 HOURS OF EXPOSURE. They said only about a 1/2 doz cases are reported each year becasue of mis-diagnosis and lack of knowledge. They said the most suseptable bodies of water are small ponds and impoundments of stagnant water as well and especially those enriched by fertilizers, nutrients, sewage and manure. This is basically a very dangerious algea bloom. They said these blooms are usually short in duration. Ponds with a strong odor, discoloration as well as a funky film that ranges from brown to blue green should be avoided during th earmer months when these blooms are most likely to occur. They didn't say it was an epidemic or highly likely expereince but it does happen.

This infomration hits home becasue a little over 18 months ago my buddies dog died in OHIO so he got a puppy, when I went out to his wedding a few months later he (my freind) looked like sh*t. He had lost all kinds of weight, had stomach problems and many of the symptoms stated earlier. While I am not a doctor I asked him a few questions, becasue it didn't make sense and after several doctors visits, with blood work, he still had no answers... it was going on 2 months now. One of the questions was "had you drank or been swimming in any questionsable water. He said that in September he had to strip down to swim out into a pond becasue his dog, who was about 6-7 months at the time, was floundering in the water of this pond, tired I guess? His syptoms started soon afterward. I'm not diagnossising it as such but the corolating factors match. He's fine now, his new dog was never infected. But he did say that when was rescuing his pup he was constatnly getting water in his mouth form the dog splashing and his strugle to swim and hold the dog. His original dog passed, due to a stroke.

I just wanted to pass this information on. I was not able to find the article on the net in order to cut/paste it, but wanted to share the important points. I would hate for any of you guys or your dogs to become infected. If you do a search on the bacteria and toxins stated earlier you should have no trouble finding more info.

Anthony

PS> A little over 2 months till dove season[excited]
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I just did a quick search and found this site..

http://wlapwww.gov.bc.ca/wat/wq/reference/cyanophytes.html#occur


It's got lots of info, albiet very scientific and somewhat of a labor to read, but info none the less.
 

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Thanks for the heads up. I might hold my dog from swimming in any farm ponds this summer since it sounds like that's where the majority of these blooms might be. Years ago I contracted a nasty case of Viral Menengitius from surfing at the Jersey shore so I am usually super careful about water quality but this is the first I heard of this. Thanks again.

-Evans
 

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I'm not sure that it works for this type of toxin, but our vet asked vaccinated our dog for bacteria that our found in stagnat waters. We told the vet that our dog is a water lover, and you can't keep her out of it. Vet provided a shot, she said it is not 100% effective, but can help prevent disease from waterborn bacteria.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Big E, I guess total abstonance is the cure although I don't know how realistic it is. I don't think it's a major problem. From what I read the blooms are quick, a few days to a week at most. I think the best way is to take a look at the pond. If it's has a nasty crud floating and smells bad stay away otherwise I would think it's ok? Growing up my golden was always into some nasty funk and never got sick (besides worms) but the best thing to do is ask a vet.
 
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