Tidal Fish Forum banner
1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,167 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
With temps a little cooler in MD this weekend, I decided to head up to PA to hit Yellow Breeches in hopes of some warmer water and active fish. I'd heard that the water was high and somewhat muddy in prior days due to snow melt, but figured the worst was probably past. I hit the water around 1pm at the C&R section, starting with a woolly bugger first. The water was high and slightly stained, and looked better for nymphing, so I switched to a copper john, midge nymph tandem and worked my way downstream. Stuck the first fish near some downed tree limbs on the midge. Midges were hatching, and I saw an occasional stonefly in the water as well, but only saw one fish rising, so I stayed below the surface. I found a nice riffle at the very downstream end of the C&R sect, and stuck three more rainbows in 10 minutes, including one submarine that was at least 15 inches and very fat that skied like a silver salmon when I hooked him. Could barely turn his head in the strong current with 5x tippet, but eventually got him in. Sorry for no pictures. But a fun day on the water. There were quite a few other fishermen out, but plenty of room for all, at least while I was there. Spring is in the air!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,866 Posts
Very nice. I think murky water can offer some of the best fishing imagineable. Black woolly buggers and red san juan worms usually get bit in almost muddy water.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,167 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
High, murky water certainly masks sloppy casts and bumbling approaches, which are my trademark :). The water was surprisingly cold for Yellow Breeches with the snow melt overwhelming the warmer spring water. But I think faster water like that may stir the bottom up, getting some of those nymphs and other forage drifting along and make the trout more aggressive despite the temps (my guess would be upper 30s, maybe 40).
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top