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Discussion Starter #1
This may be a sacreligious question on this board, but does anyone use a canoe? I don't really care for kayaks. I've owned two and never felt comfortable in them. I'm looking for advise on the most stable solo canoe out there. If it doubled as a tandem that would be a plus but is not essential. I primarily stay in Rock and Stoney Creeks and the back bays of Ocean City. Thanks all
 

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Get a Sit on Top Kayak.They're much more stable than a Canoe.Canoes work ok for 2 people but can be a real pain in a breeze for one paddler.
 

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Russ,

Try the forums at paddling.net or paddle-fishing.com. They are a little more canoe friendly. I'm about burnt out on SOTs and thinking about a canoe or sit-in kayak myself.

Phil R
 

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I use both a canoe and a Tarpon 120 SIT kayak. If I am by myself or just want to fish, then I would take my yak. If I want to fish in deeper water at a greater distance and bring a friend, then I will use my canoe equiped with a 50lbs of thrust trolling motor. The canoe is even equiped to run a trotline for crabbing. I often catch a bushel or more of crabs from the canoe.
 

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I fish a SOT Yak and Canoe both. I generaly pick the open canoe for pond fly fishing. I can stand up in it while casting and it's also the boat to use for two people in calm water. Down river it's better too.

The SOT Yak is far better for salt and rough water.

Although I have done a lot of it. I am not recomending standing up in a canoe. It's like riding a bike with no hands works good until you hit a bump.

Boats
 

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The only boats I have ever owned have been canoes. I have never seriously fished from a kayak... just goofed off in them on rare occasions. I use canoes only for fishing and almost always solo. Probably do 50-70 launches a year for the past 45 years. Right now I'm using a 16' Oldtown Camper, weight 60#, easy for me to get it up on the Jeep. Use to do all freshwater but the past 8 years I've done 90% salt. My usual tidal haunts are Patapsco, Magothy, Kent Narrows and Susky Flats, sometimes Gunpowder & Severn. Always use a 35# troller & 2 batteries. Except when doing whitewater trips, I have never capsized or fallen out while fishing... not even close. But then I would never take it out in the main part of the Bay either, CBBT would be out of the question for me.

Canoes are stable enough and hold more stuff then a kayak. These's room for a decent sized cooler, fishfinder, 3 rods, anchor, and a medium sized tackle bag. Wind is a major problem though, get blown all over the place. 10-15mph is my max, anything over 10mph starts becoming a royal pain. Range is more restricted than a kayak. Even with 2 batteries my total range is about 5 miles... thats 2.5 miles away and 2.5 miles to get back... ya always gotta get back! I often hear guys going much farther in kayaks... like 2X or 3X farther than I can do in a canoe.

It all boils done to trade offs. Can't beat a canoe or kayak for poking around piers for perch & pickerel but when out in big open water the risk factor goes way up. Skinny to very skinny water will be your forte. Never have to worry about breaking a prop or bending a shaft like so many big boaters have reported recently. They're easy on the gas too... real easy. Gotta pick your days very carefully though.

Add a second person in my 16' Camper and the stability goes out the window. When solo, I think the trolling motor plus 110 pounds of batteries on the floor adds a great deal of stability.
 

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Can your canoe handle a 2'-3' chop with a 20 kt. headwind? My 16' SOT kayak can. I'm not saying I go after that kind of conditions but have been stuck in it a couple times. In a canoe you would be swimming.
 

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I canoe fish a 16' Indian River Sunrise. I just use it in private ponds and local water supply lakes. I probably wouldn't canoe where there are large motor boats. I have a 15' skiff for those places.
Kayaks are very nice to paddle and are definitely more ideal for windy wavey conditions. Like someone said before there are trade offs.

When I was looking at canoes, I liked the Old Town Stillwater 14. It's a nice lightweight flat wide bottom canoe that could probably be paddled solo fairly easily.

Paddling.net has a lot of good reviews of both canoes and kayaks.

good luck.
Brian
 

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I was guiding the other day, and our group of kayakers ended up rescuing two canoes, which had flipped and filled to the brim. A good thing there were kayakers around... Ha!

Seriously, I started paddle fishing from a canoe, but then was totally hooked a a yak. Each serves it's purpose well, but I wouldn't go near rough open water on a canoe.

John "Toast" Oast
Williamsburg Kayak Fishing Association
http://wkfa.org/
 

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Discussion Starter #10
OK, so what is the MOST STABLE yak around. That was my problem with the Hobie outback I had. I was dumped twice by a boat wake. I loved fishing from the small boat, I just don't want to die doing it. Fortunately both times I went down it was warm, but I like to fish pretty much year round.
 

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You need to find a shop that will let you try out a few kayaks. As for stable kayaks there are plenty out there that are a ton more stable than that hobie. I've tried that Tarpon 12 footer and that was tough to flip ( I imagine the bigger ones are too) and I saw the Ocean Kayak Prowler and I can't imagine that being easy to toss. I own an old Ocean Kayak Scupper pro TW and it's a little tippy but that's what I sacrifice for speed. Everybody has their own favorites that's why trying it out is best. Their use to be a shop in Annapolis right by ego alley but I'm not sure if it's there anymore. If you look around other kayak sites you'll find plenty of ideas and shops.
 

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Basically the wider the kayak the greater initial stability it will have. It will also be slower. It's a trade off.

You should not be kayaking in any kayak (or canoe in my opinion) in cold water without the appropriate gear (dry suit, or dry top and waders). You can read a lot about the right gear for cold water on the kayakfishingstuff website.

Josh
 

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If you're looking for stability,It seems to me that the Cobra Fish.n Dive would have to be one of the most stable.It has a capacity of 600lbs.,it's 36in.wide,12.5 ft.long, weighs in at 60lbs and has an optional small mtr. bracket..It was designed for carrying & transporting heavy Diveing equiptment.
 
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