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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Whom do you call to report someone killing endangered birds(Blue Herons)?? I tried DGIF and they reffered me to US FISH AND WILDLIFE and they referred me to some place in Mass.

A close neighbor said he's killed a Heron for getting into his pond and eating minnows and he'll start shooting Hawks because they might get his ducks.Does'nt seem right to me[sad]

That kind of **** really chaps my A$$$$$.

Darren
 

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I had a problem with a neighbors cats getting the goldfish in my pond. I used some 2X4's to lay across the pond and then covered the pond with netting. Its the same type of netting that people use to protect their fruit trees from birds.

Report Wildlife violations on the VDGIF crime line by calling: 1-800-237-5712

http://www.dgif.virginia.gov/wildlife/
 

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Sounds like your neighbor might be screwin with you a bit. Have you seen him doing this? Might be a good idea to have some proof before turning him in. Think about all of what you just wrote.
 

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I haven't seen anything that says a Blue Heron is endangered, or even protected, except in certain habitats and reserves.
Someone please correct me if I'm wrong.
 

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A google on the following:

migratory bird protection blue heron

Provided the following links which pretty much include it on the list of federally protected migratory birds.

http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Ardea_herodias.html

If you poke around here:

http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/html/uscode16/usc_sup_01_16_10_7_20_III.html

You can probably find all that you need. I still have not found where it calls out any species.

TITLE 16 > CHAPTER 7 > SUBCHAPTER II > § 703

§ 703. Taking, killing, or possessing migratory birds unlawful
Release date: 2005-08-01

Unless and except as permitted by regulations made as hereinafter provided in this subchapter, it shall be unlawful at any time, by any means or in any manner, to pursue, hunt, take, capture, kill, attempt to take, capture, or kill, possess, offer for sale, sell, offer to barter, barter, offer to purchase, purchase, deliver for shipment, ship, export, import, cause to be shipped, exported, or imported, deliver for transportation, transport or cause to be transported, carry or cause to be carried, or receive for shipment, transportation, carriage, or export, any migratory bird, any part, nest, or eggs of any such bird, or any product, whether or not manufactured, which consists, or is composed in whole or part, of any such bird or any part, nest, or egg thereof, included in the terms of the conventions between the United States and Great Britain for the protection of migratory birds concluded August 16, 1916 (39 Stat. 1702), the United States and the United Mexican States for the protection of migratory birds and game mammals concluded February 7, 1936, the United States and the Government of Japan for the protection of migratory birds and birds in danger of extinction, and their environment concluded March 4, 1972 [1] and the convention between the United States and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics for the conservation of migratory birds and their environments concluded November 19, 1976.

Tom
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Perdue1, I vknow what I wrote.I've had problems with my neighbor from day 1, I dont see what he has to gain from saying that.He said he shot itand buried it in his yard. If i find out he's at it again ,I'll report it.

Tom, thanks for the link.
 

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[Q]Tom Powers originally wrote:
A google on the following:

migratory bird protection blue heron

Provided the following links which pretty much include it on the list of federally protected migratory birds.

http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Ardea_herodias.html

If you poke around here:

http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/html/uscode16/usc_sup_01_16_10_7_20_III.html

You can probably find all that you need. I still have not found where it calls out any species.

TITLE 16 > CHAPTER 7 > SUBCHAPTER II > § 703

§ 703. Taking, killing, or possessing migratory birds unlawful
Release date: 2005-08-01

Unless and except as permitted by regulations made as hereinafter provided in this subchapter, it shall be unlawful at any time, by any means or in any manner, to pursue, hunt, take, capture, kill, attempt to take, capture, or kill, possess, offer for sale, sell, offer to barter, barter, offer to purchase, purchase, deliver for shipment, ship, export, import, cause to be shipped, exported, or imported, deliver for transportation, transport or cause to be transported, carry or cause to be carried, or receive for shipment, transportation, carriage, or export, any migratory bird, any part, nest, or eggs of any such bird, or any product, whether or not manufactured, which consists, or is composed in whole or part, of any such bird or any part, nest, or egg thereof, included in the terms of the conventions between the United States and Great Britain for the protection of migratory birds concluded August 16, 1916 (39 Stat. 1702), the United States and the United Mexican States for the protection of migratory birds and game mammals concluded February 7, 1936, the United States and the Government of Japan for the protection of migratory birds and birds in danger of extinction, and their environment concluded March 4, 1972 [1] and the convention between the United States and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics for the conservation of migratory birds and their environments concluded November 19, 1976.

Tom
[/Q]Thanks. They are clearly protected though probably not endangered.
 

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the great blue heron is not an endangered species. however, it does fall under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act of 1918:

Following close on the heels of the Lacey Act and the Weeks-McLean Law, the framers of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act were determined to put an end to the commercial trade in birds and their feathers that, by the early years of the 20th century, had wreaked havoc on the populations of many native bird species.

The Migratory Bird Treaty Act decreed that all migratory birds and their parts (including eggs, nests, and feathers) were fully protected.

The Migratory Bird Treaty Act is the domestic law that affirms, or implements, the United States' commitment to four international conventions (with Canada, Japan, Mexico, and Russia) for the protection of a shared migratory bird resource. Each of the conventions protect selected species of birds that are common to both countries (i.e., they occur in both countries at some point during their annual life cycle).

For those desiring additional information on the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, a detailed synopsis is available. That section of the United States Code pertaining to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act can also be accessed.

http://www.fws.gov/migratorybirds/intrnltr/treatlaw.html

mike
 
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