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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A good fillet knife. What made me think of this is I'm going to take a couple dozen knives and a couple meat sissors over to Courtland, Va. to the knife factory and get them professionally sharpen. My wife and I just found out last Thursday that they take in knives off the public for sharpening. The factory which is in a small industrial park provides and sharpens knives for I think about 6 chicken processing plants in Va. and N.C.. It is a little expense but want to see how good a job they do. We are told it is $60.00 for the first dozen knives and you get a break in price for any more over the first dozen. Going to make sure my fishing fillet and hunting knives are in the first batch of knives I take over there. Up till now the only sharpener I used on my fillet knife has been one of those cheap ones you drag down the blade.

Acey
 

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AC My dad bought me a gerber razor blade knife, two yrs ago for Christmas. It is orange, a folding knife with removable scalpel blades, came with 10 blades. it is the best knife ive ever cleaned a duck with. I love that knife, always scared to loose it.

for fillet knife, ive got a stainless steel normark made in finland...used it for years,, sharp knife, never been sharpened but still sharp as ever, must have cleaned hundreds of fish with it.

Also my dad bought me a rapala electric knife about 4 yrs back, came with wall plug, alligator clips, and car plug... as well as a long set of blades and a short set. If I clean more than 7 fish Ill get out the electric knife, if less than 8 I just use the old school normark because its less to clean up. ( which is usually the amount I keep, because it makes a good meal with nothing left over or to freeze )

Let me know how the sharpening goes. I'm sure they'll do a fine job.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
PP how do you like the electric knife for filleting? I've never tried an electric knife cause I've been afraid you could cut into the rib cage and get a few pieces of bone and not know it. Ever since I learn to fillet a flounder back in the late 60's I've always taken pride in my fillets never; never have a piece of bone in them. Many, many years ago wife gave me for Christmas a set of Stanley knives in a case. One of the knives is a 10" fillet. All knives have yellow and black handles.

Acey
 

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Andy, another good story. I learned how to sharpen knives from an old fellow who was the father of a lady my parents rented an apartment from in Willoughby when they came here in the 40's. He was in his mid 90's when I was 10 which was 1963. He had trained as a blacksmith in Minnesota and came here to work in the shipyard during WWI, yes I said WWI. He worked there as a tool maker making saws and wood cutting tools. He was blind by the time he showed me but still sharpened hand saws and knives by feel only. He said the key was to use the same angle and stroke every time and not to look too hard with your eyes, of course I sliced my fingers a few times till I figured it out! It was amazing to watch him sharpen a hand saw by feel only, resetting the angle of the teeth and filing each tooth.
 

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Sharpening knives is one thing; sharpening saws is an altogether different ball game-especially if you are doing it without vision. That is where a lifetime of experience come in. Anyone can learn to sharpen knives if they are willing to put in the time and get a few simple tools. Unless a blade has been badly abused, you can usually bring them back to very sharp with a few strokes on a ceramic hone. Bosko is right. Finding and repeating the correct angle is the key. Stroke like you are trying to cut into the hone. Pulling the blade backward on the hone which will create a wire edge that will roll over and become dull. For extra dull knives, a good set of diamond grit sharpening grits will do wonders. Harbor Freight sells a four sided combo that has 200, 300, 400 and 600 grit and has its own holder for less than $15.00. I do a lot of wood carving and make my own carving knives from sawsall blades. I shape and establish the edge of the blade with a belt sander. I then use the diamond hone block to sharpen the edge starting with the coarser grit and working to the finest. I then use the ceramic hone to finish it. When they are finished up, you can shave with them. The shallower the angel on the blade, the better the blade will cut but too shallow and the edge will deform and break. Too steep an angle and the edge will be durable but not cut very well.
 

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PP: How do the blades hold up? I have a couple of dental compound knives that work on the same principle but they have a tendency to break where they fit over the tang on the handle.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Good story Bosco and some very good information by the both of you; Bosco and JERRY. I was never shown the proper angle to hold the blade when sharpening a knife on a stone. Can put a pretty good and sharp edge on a knife with a stone but for most of the recent past years I've used the plastic holder with the X's down in the slot (hope you know what I mean) which you drag the sharpener down the blade. Now my question is the electric knife blade sharpeners on the market; they have slots you drag the blade thru for sharpening. Do these slots automatically impose the proper angle to the blade when you enter it into the slot?

Acey

After posting my question I went on bing and found this.

Electric knife sharpeners don't provide much control, but they're faster and easier to use. They also tend to be larger -- nearly the size of a toaster -- and are designed to sit on your countertop. In almost every case, you pull the knife slowly through specially designed slots in the sharpener; abrasives hidden inside the slots do the sharpening. Expect to spend around $150 for the convenience of an electric sharpener.

The angle at which you position the knife during sharpening is key. Most electric sharpeners have guides to help you maintain the blade at the right angle, and some can accommodate multiple blade angles. European/Western knives typically have a blade angle of 20 degrees, while Asian knives typically have a blade angle of 15 degrees, although many European knife makers have started introducing 15-degree blades as well.

Acey
 
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