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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey all,
My father wanted to desperately get on some topwater action Friday after the pictures a showed him of this past Thursday.
The weather was not cooperating Saturday afternoon, but we tried anyway. Only fished for an hour. Was anchored on a point and the anchor broke free, before we knew it, the high winds had pushed us on a small rock pile I never knew was there. Sure enough I felt contact on the hull.

Returned home and inspected the hull. Found two very small scrapes/ gouges near the stern on the bottom of the hull. They aren't longer than an inch and half inch respectfully (which you can't tell from the pics) but they are into the glass. I definitely want to get it fixed before it goes back into the water. After doing some research I hear a lot of talk about Marine Tex. Is this a good option? Or should I go and use fiberglass?

Also while inspecting my hull with scrutiny, I noticed along my starboard running keel, what appears to be a series of dents/scratches. They look as though they were made with a medium sized screw driver (not big individually) but there are hundreds if them running along my keel for about 4ft. Pictures attached of this as well. Do any of you know what caused this? Is it a serious problem that needs attention ASAP? Could this be another issue resolved with Marine Tex?

Thanks for all your help. You guys are very knowledgeable and I appreciate any advice from a guy just getting started in boat repairs. My CC has been great to me, so it's only fair I'm good to her as well.

Cheers all.
 

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The marks on the keel might be from a bolt or bracket on your trailer rubbing as boat comes on trailer.

The angle and width of some of them look the same.

I've seen keels get scraped on trailers before.

Fiberglass is not too hard to repair - stop by a West Marine - they carry everything you'll need to make repair yourself.

Google fiberglass repair video - lot of good You tube videos out there to give you basic ideas.
 

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I second the trailer but we had a older boston whaler that was sitting in the water in a slip when lighting struck the pier. It looked like someone shot the bottom of the boat but some of the marks where similar to what you have.
 

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I've used MarineTex for similar damage to my boat bottom ! and the stuff works ! and is simple to work with +++ !
Mixes up like a expoxy/putty/paste, clean and scuff up the area, push and fill in the area, smooth it out, let it dry, done !
or if you care, sand it smooth and make it pretty , my concern was just to keep the water back.
Make sure you get the right one (for fiberglass) , as they make a few different types of patching materials.

I just dread fiberglass resin and trying to fix surfaces that face downwards, the resin just loves to run downhill !
but I imagine it is a 'better' engineering fix and the best bonding.
 

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x2 for marine tex or one of the epoxy "sticks" you can get pretty much anywhere.

most important!!! make sure its good dry!!! sand, then let dry, even put a heat lamp on it, wipe with laquer thinner, then apply.
 

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Mix some filler into the resin to make a putty to avoid runs. Since you are filling and don't require structural strength from the filler the cheaper stuff will work. Get it at West Marine, along with a small can of resin and hardener and the pump set to make the appropriate mix ratio simply by pumping some of each into a paper cup.

I've used MarineTex for similar damage to my boat bottom ! and the stuff works ! and is simple to work with +++ !
Mixes up like a expoxy/putty/paste, clean and scuff up the area, push and fill in the area, smooth it out, let it dry, done !
or if you care, sand it smooth and make it pretty , my concern was just to keep the water back.
Make sure you get the right one (for fiberglass) , as they make a few different types of patching materials.

I just dread fiberglass resin and trying to fix surfaces that face downwards, the resin just loves to run downhill !
but I imagine it is a 'better' engineering fix and the best bonding.
 

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I love MarineTex for damage into the the fiberglass because I believe it provides a much better barrier to water than polyester gel stuff. It's easy to work with if you don't give a rat's but about appearance, but if you lay it on even a little too tick it is a real booger to sand down. Yes, it is sandable, but it takes a lot of elbow grease and you need to be careful that you don't sand away the adjacent gel coat in the process. On deeper gouges, I like to use MarineTex (West marine has their own brand which is several $$ cheaper and appears to be the same stuff, but I believe it is only available in white. White and grey are different as I believe only the grey is recommended for machinery repairs) and try to cover all of the exposed fiberglass but keep the repair a little low so that I don't have too much to sand. When I'm satisfied that my barrier is intact I apply a polyester resin gel coat which is readily tintable to match the hull (that's a whole 'nuther matter - white marinetex is also tintable, but I've never tried to do matching finish color matching with it. If you're talking about a repair on a painted bottom, color matching is a moot point. But I'll say it again because several have commented about how easy marinetex is - sanding it is a bear. You pretty much have to hand sand it down, because if you use a power sander it is highly likely that you will get enough heat buildup to semi-liquify the surface and foul your abrasive sheet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks guys.

So much knowledge here (its a fantastic resource). I went to West Marine, got the WM brand of Marine Tex (apparently made by Marine Tex for WM) and also picked up some acetone, wet sanding paper and rubber gloves. Ground out the dings, wiped with acetone, and applied the Marine Tex. I then applied some packaging tape (sticky side down) over the Marine Tex repair to smooth it out. Apparently, once it cures, you can peel off the tape and its nice and smooth, and much easier to sand. I will then probably use a little rubbing compound, buff and put a little wax over it.

I am definitely not worried about appearances, as this is a 1995 CC made for fishing and is by no means a show boat. Plus, this is the VERY bottom of the boat, and is never seen. That being said, it has been a FANTASTIC boat to me, and has never let me down in any aspect. So I do want to take care of it, and keep the water from infiltrating the hull.

As for the "screwdriver" marks on the starboard running keel, I was doing some brain storming (stand clear everybody) and I am thinking it might be a carpenter's staple that had popped above the carpeting on the bunk? Every time I load on/off it must be hitting. Next time I launch, I will have to take a look at the inside of the bunk!!!!

You guys are great. Thanks for the help. Lets hope that wind dies down, and I can get her back in the water for some Stripers on the surface with my father.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Holy Crow Dude...you been havin some bad luck. First the tar now this doh
Yeah, but Ive been catching fish...So I only consider it to be a minor inconvenience. I honestly have put minimal money into this boat since I bought it. Its been great to me. It deserves the same in return. The memories on it alone are worth the time to keep it water tight.
 

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SD What is the blue stuff ? And what kind of boat is it? Gel coat doesn't seem very thick? Not picking but I hit rocks with my Starcraft made 1/8 inch gouges Could not see the glass. I fixed them with Marinetex. Yes and put it on smooth with the finish. Don't need sanding if you put it on right.
Hope you get it fixed nice. Les
 

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Just to clarify: Using the tape, shiny side against the marinetex (or polyester for that matter) is a great way to get a shiny smooth surface. Apply enough tape over the shiny-side-down stuff to make sure that the shiny tape doesn't fall off and pull a "tail" with it before the repair has cured (much more of an issue with polyester). I especially like to use something a little stiffer, like the clear plastic around the collars in new shirts or the clear plastic that encases so many things that hang on hooks in the store. They are less prone to deforming the surface by transmitting every little finger touch into an irregular surface. Once you sand, you will lose the gloss finish, but it can be restored by fine sanding and polishing - it just takes more time. And the gloss surface is not easier to sand. The trick is to try to use just enough material to fill the voids, too much and it spread over the adjacent areas when you smooth out the tape, and require sanding to feather off the edges. It's easier to apply too little and go back a time or two and add a little more until everything is flush. Additional layers do not affect the durability of the marinetex, and I've never seen such a repair delaminate. It takes a but longer to to do the repairs in thin layers due to curing times, but it can be a lot less work than trying to apply everthing at once and then sand down the overages.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
SD What is the blue stuff ? And what kind of boat is it? Gel coat doesn't seem very thick? Not picking but I hit rocks with my Starcraft made 1/8 inch gouges Could not see the glass. I fixed them with Marinetex. Yes and put it on smooth with the finish. Don't need sanding if you put it on right.
Hope you get it fixed nice. Les
Hey Les,

The blue stuff is old anti fouling hull paint. I go the boat second hand, it was kept on a lift. Its chalking away. At some point I plan on stripping it completely then adding a gel coat or painting the bottom.

The boat is an 18' 1995 Sunbird Neptune Center Console. I know they aren't the "top of the line" make of boat. But its suited me more than fine so far (going on 10 years).
 

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Yeah, but Ive been catching fish...So I only consider it to be a minor inconvenience. I honestly have put minimal money into this boat since I bought it. Its been great to me. It deserves the same in return. The memories on it alone are worth the time to keep it water tight.
Ya sure can't beat that, sounds like you got a good un :thumbup: :fishing2:
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
The tape worked wonders. I plan on wet sanding with 400 grit then 600 then applying rubbing compound and wax.

Is the 3M rubbing compound you find at wal mart okay for this or should I get the kind from west marine?
 

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For anyone with similar type hull damage:
The key thing to know for anyone with exposed fiberglass on their hull is that it is important to seal the gelcoat breeches in a timely fashion. The vast majority of fiberglass boats out there, and virtually all older ones, were laid up with polyester resins to bind the fiberglass substrate. Fiberglass is water permeable, which means that water will penetrate into the resin where in concert with unreacted resin components it can it can create an acidic condition which can result in the breakdown of ester linkages which compromise the majority of bonds in polyester polymers. This lead to blisters, delamination and loss of structural intergrity in the fiberglass. Bottom line, it's best to seal off surface damage which goes into the fiberglass, especially if those defects are below the water line. Immediate repair is not necessary, but such faults should be addressed in a timely fashion.

 
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