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While fishing the wall in the Kent Narrows, I snagged a line not too much thicker than a Trot line. It appeared to be anchored on each end and as I pulled it up I found an eel trap tied to it. I unsnaged my jig and dropped it back down. It did not have a floating buoy marker any where near it. As I motored away it occurred to me that it may be a rogue line that got away in all of this lovely spring weather.

I am not the type to take things that do not belong to me and I did not know the regulation for eel traps so I left it alone. Did I do the right thing or did I blow it? I plead ignorance, but would like to know for future reference.
 

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yes you did the right thing,, it belonged to a local waterman and that is a legal means of trapping eels,, pots on a trot line where no one can steal or harvest there ways of making a livlihood,, as we all know how people love to take things that do not belong to em,, if they were on a buoy then they would either be stolen,, harvested or cut off by some one not paying attention,, especially at night, thanks for being a good person.:thumbup:
 

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Going from memory - I think you can set around 10 eel pots to catch your own eels for bait or to eat.

They have to be around 6 inches long or so to keep.

Not sure if pots need your name on them or not.

You did right by leaving it but you might want to let DNR know where it is.

I've seen eel potters lay long strings in the Severn - no markers. They come back later and drop a grapple hook to snare the line.
 
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