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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What's the skinny on using +500 grain sinking lines. I've been looking into getting a new rod 10-12wt. (Sage xi2;Scott S3S; Loomis CCGLX) , and I was wondering what those rods would be able to handle. I've been looking into using SA Bluewater Express, but it is rated for higher wt. rods. What's a good sinking line for the bay...I already have a 425grn on my 9wt. Clearwater Classic that seems to do pretty well with the small fish, but I don't think I'm getting below 10ft. I was told that I would need at least a 600grn in order to get down to big fish. Do I need a 12 wt. for these higher rated sinking lines?

Anyone have any input on the Scott Heli-Plys? Might be able to get a pretty good deal on a 11wt.
 

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Search the board for "RIO Lake 7" and for recent threads by David M on his DIY sinking line . You shouldn't need a 12wt to fish the bay, the 9wt should be just fine.
But if you're just looking for an excuse to buy a 12wt, then please ignore everything I've said so far. ;)
 

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If you're only getting down 10' with your 425gr, then you're not waiting long enough. Any sinking line will go to the bottom if you wait long enougn. Don't expect any sinking line to plummet to the bottom like a 3oz sinker.
 

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Sawyers suggestion of Rio's deep lake 7 is an excellent one.

I picked one up after OMC gave it rave reviews, and he was right on.

I have some T14 heads that are cheap and easy to repair that get used around pilings and such, but I like the lake line better.
 

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like davp said. You have to wait. I've caught sea trout in 45 feet of water when the fish were at 40 feet. I just wait till the line got down that deep. But the question is , was it fun. The answer to me was no. I've never found a reason to go heaver then 450 in the bay and most of my fishing was done with a 300 and a 350. Even over here in the ocean, i will say so far that is still all i've needed. Now some and you may want to talk to brian or sarah. have had a need for heaver lines for the type of fishing they do. But like some fly fishing. Their are the spical needs to catch some spices.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I'd really like to try my luck with some of the 2-4ft sharks in the bay. We always catch them while flounder/bluefish fishing. I just think it would be a blast. We're usually in 20-25' and wouldn't mind snagging some flounder while I'm at it.

I also wanted something that would get down to the big stipers in the winter.

When fishing near bridges, how do you not get caught up badly when using fast and x-fast sinking lines? In particular, the CBBT and Oregon Inlet bridges where the water can be moving at extreme rates.
 

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When fishing the pilings of the CBBT you sometimes do get hung up. Most of the time you can maneuver the boat to a position and get your line and fly back. Also if you observe you will notice the current is not only moving through the bridge but also slightly sideways in one direction. If you position the boat so the caster can cast right near the piling as the current moves slightly away from it, the line can sweep in front of the piling as it is sinking and not get hung up.

This is where it is a huge advantage to be fishing with other fly fishers. They understand these things and the cost of fly lines and try to help out the fly fisher in presenting his line, so as to get near the pilings and strike zone without wrapping the piling. A fellow fly fisher will also understand why you want to try hard to get your line back when it does get hung on or near a piling. If my goal is to fly fish as much as possible, I take other fly fishers. Nothing against spin fishers--I do plenty of that too--but things just work out better if you fish structure with someone who understands fly fishing.

I do not try to fly fish the CBBT pilings when it is really rough or when the current is rushing hard.

I use the Custom Tip Express which is basically T-14. When big stripers are present, I use 25 pound FC tippet for easier handling at the boat, but I found that T-14 will sometimes tear less than that. So I went back to 20 pound to allow the fly or leader to break off before the line parts if the line cannot be freed.
 

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Well as to getting hung up. you have to keep in contact with your fly by having a good idea just where it is in the water colume. You do that by learning just how fast your line is sinking. Each lines sinks at different rates do to water densidy tide speed and a number of other factors. What I did to learn how fast my line was sinking. Was to go to a area where I knew it had a clear sandy bottom. Made a cast and waited till I know the line was on the bottom. then I would make the cast again and count it down after each cast by adding or subtracting till I felt the bottom again. Then I would cast maybe ten times counting down the same number . To make sure I was feeling the bottom each time I counted down to that number. I did this in a verity of water depths til I was comfortable with that line. Then I just learned to count longer for more tide or less for less tide.
So now when I cast the line I have a realy good idea where in the water colume it is. I still get hung up once in a while but not as much as I first did. I think this has help me catch more fish as well. knowing how deep your fly is.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
So when I read the specs on sinking lines (Cortland, Airflo, etc.). How do they determine that their 500grain sinks faster than their 650grain. There's usually a .5-1 i.p.s difference per hundred grains. Also, a 600 grain in one brand can have a lot slower i.p.s. than another brand. I was looking into some that had a rate of 9.5 ips. My 425 grain is rated at 6.5 ips...I guess the only difference between that and a 650 thats rated at 9.5 is the weight rod your using? It doesn't sound like there's much of an advantage to fishing with a line that has a higher rated ips unless your fishing over 25-30ft, which is highly unlikely around here. That leads me to my next rookie question:\

In what part of the water column do most of you catch the most(or biggest)fish, in the bay? I imagine it depends on species. Just trying to get an idea. Looks like I need to get a good fish finder.

Last inquiry:
Everyone endorses Rio Lake 7. It is rated for a 7 weight rod right? I couldn't find where Rio makes several different rated Lake lines for various weight rods.

Also, what's the deal on Airflo's Depthfinder and 40+ serieses?

I like my Cortland 444 425grn.; it's caught plenty of schoolie stripers, but no one seems to talk about Cortland much.
 

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getting a good depthfinder is a good start. All the different maunf. use the same matl. to sink their lines. they also look at the difference in water density. Fresh as compared to salt. the line sinks much faster in fresh then in salt. so the saltyer the water and so on. So look at the difference as this, a 280 grain floating line weights the same as a 280 grain sinking line right. The only difference is the matl. its made from. And different matl. sinks at different rates. so thats one difference between them. So when each manuf. list his sink rate he doesn't know where you are going to use it. so, some are more conservative then others in their listing of the sink rate. they don't want some one calling them and saying "you list this as 7 ips and it only sinks 3ips. thats why they all say their sink rate is just a estament. All ya thats also why it very important to see just how fast it sinks in the waters you will be using it. So


matl. made from + matl used to sink + water density in your area + tide speed = realy time sink rate.
 

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Hey Walt-

What about line diameter? Wouldn't that be another factor controlling sink rate in real fishing situations?
 

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Walt
Did you know that your private messages have not been activated? You cannot receive private messages (bmail) until you go into your profile and turn it on.
Wayne
 

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Hey bill yes it does. But not as much today as it use to. Years ago the finishes were resist to sinking so dia. was very important. The large the dia. the more the friction Today because of the great finishes that are being manuf. they resist friction much better. But you are right the larger dia. does still add resistance and is a factor.

Thanks wayne I didn't know their was a bmail any more. When I looked and didn't see the header I just thought it was done away with. I'll go do it now .
 

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Hey Wayne how do you turn it on????? If it is high lighted in black, does that mean its on????? You have to remember getting older and being retired, still didn't make me any smarter with computers. i'm still just as dumb with them as ever. bwahahaha
 

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Walt
  • Go to your profile view or click on private messages (upper right corner of post)
  • Go to edit options
  • Scroll down to and check the box that says enable private messaging

I'm pretty well familiar with the old gray matter lapses believe me.
 

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Hey Wayne. Got er done. It took this thick skulled nit wit awhile to find every thing and when I did I felt ever more stupid. every thing was right their in my face. bwahahaha thanks again.
 
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