Tidal Fish Forum banner
1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
18,673 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been working with several organizations through along with our foundation on helping restoration efforts in the Colorado River Delta. It's a pretty amazing place. Check out the video below where I was the Producer. We have a longer documentary in the works that will be entered into film festivals.

 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
18,673 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hi Mark

My efforts have been focused on Chesapeake Bay restoration for about twenty years. Having the opportunity to work in other areas of the world has shed a lot of insight into different and new ideas on how restoration can happen, shown different approaches, and showed me how different communities who live in these ecosystems have embraced the efforts.

I've come to realize that at the heart of the Chesapeake Bay's challenge is increased population. With more people have come more pollution, with pollution has come polluted water, with polluted water has come decreased fishing populations. The decrease in fish populations has been compounded with fisheries mis-management of which I attribute to shifting baseline syndrome. It's third math that as fish populations decrease as a result in increased pollution you simply can not harvest at previous levels. If we do, which we have, then we are destined to lose many species. Take the sturgeon fishery, the Chesapeake was once the second largest caviar producer in the world. Now maybe we have a hand full of sturgeon. Chalk that up to fisheries mis-management. Oysters, yes disease wiped them out which was probably precipitated by something in the water at some point. Now we are at 1% of historic levels and we still allow the harvest of oysters in the bay. Nature has a way to reproduce and adapt, but we've never given her the chance with oysters, people keep coming up with excuse after excuse to keep harvesting. Chalk the future disappearance of the wild Chesapeake oyster up to fisheries mis management.

As for water pollution, we have made "some" progress, but my question is, "Is progress keeping up with population growth or getting ahead of it?" If we do not fix the sewer plants and do a better job at curtailing run off then it's not an if we'll kill the bay, it's a when.

I'll continue to do what I can for the Chesapeake because I live here and care, but it will take everyone coming together and doing his/her part to make it happen. As for working in other areas of the world, I'll continue to do that as well because we live in a global society where everything effects the other one way or the other.

Thanks
Brandon
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
18,673 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Hi Jeff

Thanks. I think we are on the same page in general, bottom line is if we all do not do our part we are in some trouble. The impervious surface discussion is spot on, in fact scientists can link a certain percentage to when trout can not survive in our tributaries.

As a point of discussion I would be interested to know what the growth in the Chesapeake Bay watershed has been from 2000-2010?

Thanks
Brandon
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top