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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It just got better:

[q]Employers Boost March Payrolls by 211,000
Apr 07 8:39 AM US/Eastern
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By JEANNINE AVERSA
AP Economics Writer

WASHINGTON

Employers, in a springtime hiring burst, boosted payrolls by a sizable 211,000 in March and pushed the nation's unemployment rate down to 4.7 percent.

The latest snapshot, released by the Labor Department on Friday, suggested that an accelerating economic expansion is putting companies in the hiring mood, brightening prospects for job seekers.

Hiring gains were fairly widespread. Construction, financial activities, education and health care and government were among the sectors posting payroll gains. That help to blunt job losses in manufacturing and in the transportation industries.

The unemployment rate, which dropped from February's 4.8 percent, ended up matching January's jobless rate, which was the lowest in 4 1/2 years.

Employment was stronger in March than economists were expecting. Before the release of the report, they were forecasting a gain of 190,000 jobs and they said they believed the overall civilian jobless rate would hold steady.

Good news on the economy, however, hasn't been helping President Bush in the eyes of the public. Bush's job-approval rating of 36 percent is at its lowest level in an AP-Ipsos poll

On the jobs front, payroll gains in January and February turned out to be slightly less than previously reported but still suggest decent job growth. Employers added 154,000 jobs in January, versus the 170,000 estimated a month ago. In February, payrolls grew by 225,000, rather than the 243,000 previously reported.

Employees' average hourly earnings, meanwhile, were $16.49 in March, a modest 0.2 percent increase from February. Economists were forecasting a 0.3 percent increase.

With the economy growing smartly and the job market flowering, the Federal Reserve and other economists are keeping a close eye on wage growth.

Wage improvement is good for workers, but a rapid, sustained acceleration triggers inflation concerns at the Federal Reserve and among economists.

Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke and his colleagues boosted interest rates on March 28 to a five-year high and hinted that additional increases were possible to keep inflation at bay.

An improving job market and stepped-up production "in combination with the elevated prices of energy and other commodities have the potential to add to inflation pressures," Fed policymakers said at the March meeting.

Economists believe rates will go up again on May 10.

The report also showed the average time that the 7 million unemployed spent searching for work in March was 16.9 weeks, down from 17.6 weeks in February.

The employment figures for March come against the backdrop of a rebounding economy. Analysts believe the economy emerged from an end- of-year funk and grew at an annual rate of 4.5 percent or higher in the just ended January-to-March quarter. The economy is expected to moderate in the current April-to-June quarter but still turn in a good performance.

[/q]

 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Being paid by the new workers, and additional taxes on the raised wages.
 

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Bwahahaha, yeah thats working well

[q] WASHINGTON (Reuters) - For those who struggle to balance their checkbooks every month, it might be difficult to comprehend the meaning of Thursday's vote by the U.S. Senate to raise the government debt limit to nearly $9 trillion.

After all, how much is a trillion?

It's the number one followed by 12 zeros. But that doesn't shed much light on just how deeply in debt the federal government is that it must pass a law enabling it to borrow up to $8.965 trillion.

"It's hard to understand what a trillion is. I don't know what it is," confessed Senate Budget Committee Chairman Judd Gregg, a New Hampshire Republican, this week when debating the government's staggering fiscal obligations.

It doesn't help that the standard hand-held calculator comes nowhere close to computing numbers in the trillions. About the best it can do is 99,999,999.

John Nolan, a mathematics professor at American University in Washington, said that a trillion is "not a big number at all" for some theoretical problems. "But in terms of practical numbers it's just overwhelming."

So he conjured up a spending spree, something Americans might be able to relate to. "If you spent a million dollars a day for a million days (2,739 years)," you'd hit $1 trillion, Nolan observed.

To spend $1 trillion in the average American life span of 77 years, you'd have to be on a lifetime spending spree of about $35,580,857 and change every day from birth.

Don Albers, associate executive director of the Mathematical Association of America, said to forget about all the fancy numbers. "I don't think the problem so much is understanding that number as just understanding whether they've got more money coming in than is going out," he said.

And that's the rub. The federal government has been on a spending binge. Just since 2002, the Republican-controlled Congress has had to hike the Treasury Department's credit card limit four times, for a total of more than $3 trillion.

Congress can take some comfort in knowing that at this rate, it will take a very long time to exhaust the trillions and spill into the quadrillions. "Let's hope that they won't be using that" number ever, Albers said.
[/q]
 

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[q] Hiring gains were fairly widespread. Construction, financial activities, education and health care and government were among the sectors posting payroll gains. That help to blunt job losses in manufacturing and in the transportation industries.[/q]

Only one of those sectors provide a material object that has marketable value and all indications show that industry has popped.... no one wants to admit it yet .... but new home construction and real estate are both clinically dead.
 

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[q]The report also showed the average time that the 7 million unemployed spent searching for work in March was 16.9 weeks, down from 17.6 weeks in February.
[/q]

Oh and Fritz you really screwed up that little song I always use to figure out how many days are in a month....

16 weeks has march, 17 had February .... that leaves 19 weeks for all the rest ... I just can't make it rhyme.[grin]
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I'm so sorry your life sucks (well, not really).
 

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My life is far from sucking. I am presently in a position to actually profit from this current house of cards being blown away.

I do feel sorry for my poor 11 year old nephew. With our current glutinous ways, we have left him holding the bag... But with my planning and foresight the odds look pretty good that your grand children will be cutting his grass.
 

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[Q]CSLUG originally wrote:
[q] Hiring gains were fairly widespread. Construction, financial activities, education and health care and government were among the sectors posting payroll gains. That help to blunt job losses in manufacturing and in the transportation industries.[/q]

Only one of those sectors provide a material object that has marketable value and all indications show that industry has popped.... no one wants to admit it yet .... but new home construction and real estate are both clinically dead.
[/Q]
Just sold a home at a nice profit, my check book might dispute that claim.......
 

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[Q]Capt Frank originally wrote:
[Q]CSLUG originally wrote:
[q] Hiring gains were fairly widespread. Construction, financial activities, education and health care and government were among the sectors posting payroll gains. That help to blunt job losses in manufacturing and in the transportation industries.[/q]

Only one of those sectors provide a material object that has marketable value and all indications show that industry has popped.... no one wants to admit it yet .... but new home construction and real estate are both clinically dead.
[/Q]
Just sold a home at a nice profit, my check book might dispute that claim.......
[/Q]Not really. The latest report acknowledges that there are a few pockets where RE is still alive, but overall, it's "clinically dead".
 

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[q]Just sold a home at a nice profit, my check book might dispute that claim....... [/q]

Unless you paid cash or held it for less then 5 years with a low interest only loan, I doubt it.

Calculate how much you paid and put into that house... I'd bet the bank made way more profit then you.
 

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Fritz, what did Bush have for dinner last night? You are so far up his a$$ you should be able to tell. I'll bet you have a framed picture of him somewhere in your office/home don't you?
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
And where in this post did I say Bush? In fact, it quite remarkable that an article this long and glowing about the economy forgot to mention him. She musta forgot...
 

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Fritz... I have an additional question regarding this wonderful news.

You have previously claimed that by reducing taxes new jobs will be created... which it has. This will then result in more taxpayers which will offset the reductions and ultimately reduce the defict. So we now basically have full empolyment everyones paying in and we still have a deficit.

Why?
 

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Because out goverment on both sides spends more than it makes!! The housing market has been on a tight rope for some time now. The low interest rates that we had caused a high demand for housing than builders could'nt keep up with.As rates have rise fewer people will be able to buy houses--simple 1st grade stuff--The collapse (some of the expert say) will take place as the prices for housing comes down but the rates continue to climb. The worst housing period in my memory was during the Carter years when the fed raised rates thru the ceiling and of course the current pres. got all the blame.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Good News for the Moonbats. A good economy is bad for your health:

[q]Strong US economy generates more heart attacks? By Nancy Waitz
Fri Apr 7, 8:39 AM ET

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - If a high-fat cholesterol-laden snack doesn't trigger a heart attack, then a healthy economy just might.

The risk of a fatal heart attack rises when the U.S. economy strengthens and increases further if macroeconomic conditions remain robust over the next several years, according to a study published last month.

The death rate rises in the year the economy expands and grows further if the lower rate of joblessness is maintained, Christopher Ruhm wrote in his study.

A 1 percentage point drop in unemployment is estimated to raise mortality by 1.3 percent or 2,515 additional deaths per year from heart attacks, the study showed. The mortality rate is similar for males and females.

The 20-44 age group is at a relatively higher risk than older persons, especially if the economic upturn is sustained.

Ruhm, an economics professor at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, used the example of a six-month stint working in another city for what that individual sees as a great opportunity.

"During that period of time chances are you are working so much you are not exercising, haven't had a chance to join a gym, you're eating out a lot, maybe smoking more," Ruhm said by phone from North Carolina.

"When the economy heats up, people often end up working more overtime," Ruhm said, adding they might let other parts of their life go by the wayside for a while including health.

The study focuses on 20 states with the largest populations pooled over the years 1979 to 1998 including California, New York, Texas, Florida, Pennsylvania, Illinois, Ohio, Michigan, New Jersey, North Carolina, Georgia, Virginia, Massachusetts, Indiana, Missouri, Tennessee, Wisconsin, Washington state, Maryland and Minnesota.

These states account for almost three-quarters of the national heart attack death rate and have similar patterns to the entire country.

[/q]

http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20060407/hl_nm/economy_heart_dc
 

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It will result in a great deal more fatal attacks on the wallet when all of the factors begin to align. But your desperate for something to justify your vote...have fun.
1. Largest government in history.
2. Largest national debt in history.
3. Largest net interest payments in history.
4. Largest trade deficit in history.
5. One of the largest government spending programs inflating the GNP in history.
6. The largest spending (read pork) in history without a Presidential veto (called party leadership).
7. Cut the budget of the Small Business Administration while claiming credit for the increasing economy.
8. Cut the budget for veterans while sending our sons and daughters into war. Meanwhile increasing the budget of items like the National Endowment for the Arts.
thats just a start
 
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