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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A couple of weeks ago a friend of mine from work was talking to me about getting a kayak. He asked what style I had and such and from that I offered him a paddling trip. We decided on yesterday afternoon. The weather was nice and warm, but I insisted he wear a wet suit. Since he also water-skis quite a but he agreed that he would need to wear his wet suit. As it turned out the water temp on my depth finder was about 58 degrees and considering the sensor is inside the kayak it may have been a couple of degrees off (on the warm side).

Hang in here with me now.

We went paddling and had a great time going from Tide Mill Rd ramp to Route 17 and back. He paddled the 12 footer to Rt 17 and paddled my 14 footer back. When we got back to the ramp there was a man and his wife putting their kayaks in the water so we waited for them to get ready and launch just sort of sitting back in our yaks and watching the process.

As the man got in his sit inside kayak (SIK), a Wilderness System Tsunami 140, and I saw he had on a pair of shorts, a pull-over shirt, sneakers, and a hat. I felt compelled to comment that I was surprised that he had no wet suit on (cold water protection). He said that he had had the kayaks a long time and that he had never had a need for a wet suit because he had never fallen out of his kayak (where's the logic?).

He and his wife headed up the Poquoson River close to shore and we retrieved our yaks and went home.

I have another friend (his name is Gary) at work who is on the USCG Auxiliary and he lives along the river. Today Gary says to me that a kayaker spilled over just off the shoreline from his house yesterday and fortunately it turns out that the man was in about three feet of water.

I described the guy I spoke to yesterday and it turns out it was the same guy (I described yak and his truck). Gary has no small boat to get the guy and is not about to go into cold water and have two victims. Long story short, this guy was able to get to shore with quite a bit of difficulty and Gary's wife (also USCGA) got to the guy first with a blanket.

Now this guy was in the water no more than about 5 minutes or so. They got him to Mary Immaculate Hospital ER and it turns out his body core temperature was at 95 degrees!!! This is after a 10 minute ride in a warm car with a blanket around him!

This guy is very lucky he was not out in the middle of the river or even in deeper water. His comment to Gary and his wife was that upon hitting the water he felt almost immediately sapped of all his strength!

I would guess so with cotton shorts and a cotton shirt and no cold water protection! I am going to bet he either will not go out in cold water again or will buy a wet suit or a dry suit. Fortunately, his wife wasn't there at the time and if she was, then in trying help him she may have gotten into trouble herself in her cotton sweat suit.

Be careful out there in the cold water this time of year and don't let the warm air lure you into a trip without protection.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Unfortunately, on the news last night I saw where WAVY 10 helicopter helped in the rescue of an overturned canoeist and two kayakers who tried to help, but evidently lost thier paddles in the process. One of the three did not even have a PFD on.

I think the only reason the canoeist survived is because they were able to get him out of the water and on top of one of the kayaks. I hope I never have to be rescued by the Norfolk Marine Police Patrol as they didn't handle (physically) the victims very well as they brought them into their boat. Then...... the police let the kayaks float off down the river.

We'll probably see more of this type thing as time goes on and more people get involved in kayaking and canoeing. :yes: :yes:
 

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I used to be in the CG, a very common accident was Canoe capsizings in the spring. First warm day and everyone wants to get out. Boat goes over and the water is cold. I can't tell you the stats but there are many drownings this time of the year due to the "Gasp effect" Someone gets dumped into the cold and gasp from fear and the shock, takes in water and drowns.

Sandtiger I have to take exception to your NMPP comment though, and I an no fan of the local marine police. Having pulled a lot of people out of bad situations there is no easy way to do it. We were often critized by people watching.

The other side is another story. I have picked up attentempted Suicides who jumped off bridges into shallow water and broke legs. Drunks that resisted and even fought us when pulling them out, and about any other kind of trouble you could imagine. The one that took the prize was a small outboard sinking slowly in calm water with a very large mother in law on board. We lifted her carefully, two guys one on each side. She brused up some from the lift, must have weighed over 300 lbs. We were faced with a lawsuit a week later. Never successfully sued the goverment but tried anyway. Even reasonable people when pulled from cold water and afraid will act in unusual ways. You have to be firm and aggressive in pulling them out most of the time.

When it comes to saving the Yaks. They could have had getting the victims back to shore on there mind and came back later for the boats. However years ago the CG spent a lot of time and money saving property, over and above the lifesaving part that is. Thats most of what I did, the choppers did most of the lifesaving. They just don't do it anymore. If you get into trouble, particulary offshore they will lift you and leave your boat to whatever happens. It's policy in the new post 911 Coast Guard.

Boats
 

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A couple of weeks ago a friend of mine from work was talking to me about getting a kayak. He asked what style I had and such and from that I offered him a paddling trip. We decided on yesterday afternoon. The weather was nice and warm, but I insisted he wear a wet suit. Since he also water-skis quite a but he agreed that he would need to wear his wet suit. As it turned out the water temp on my depth finder was about 58 degrees and considering the sensor is inside the kayak it may have been a couple of degrees off (on the warm side).

Hang in here with me now.

We went paddling and had a great time going from Tide Mill Rd ramp to Route 17 and back. He paddled the 12 footer to Rt 17 and paddled my 14 footer back. When we got back to the ramp there was a man and his wife putting their kayaks in the water so we waited for them to get ready and launch just sort of sitting back in our yaks and watching the process.

As the man got in his sit inside kayak (SIK), a Wilderness System Tsunami 140, and I saw he had on a pair of shorts, a pull-over shirt, sneakers, and a hat. I felt compelled to comment that I was surprised that he had no wet suit on (cold water protection). He said that he had had the kayaks a long time and that he had never had a need for a wet suit because he had never fallen out of his kayak (where's the logic?).

He and his wife headed up the Poquoson River close to shore and we retrieved our yaks and went home.

I have another friend (his name is Gary) at work who is on the USCG Auxiliary and he lives along the river. Today Gary says to me that a kayaker spilled over just off the shoreline from his house yesterday and fortunately it turns out that the man was in about three feet of water.

I described the guy I spoke to yesterday and it turns out it was the same guy (I described yak and his truck). Gary has no small boat to get the guy and is not about to go into cold water and have two victims. Long story short, this guy was able to get to shore with quite a bit of difficulty and Gary's wife (also USCGA) got to the guy first with a blanket.

Now this guy was in the water no more than about 5 minutes or so. They got him to Mary Immaculate Hospital ER and it turns out his body core temperature was at 95 degrees!!! This is after a 10 minute ride in a warm car with a blanket around him!

This guy is very lucky he was not out in the middle of the river or even in deeper water. His comment to Gary and his wife was that upon hitting the water he felt almost immediately sapped of all his strength!

I would guess so with cotton shorts and a cotton shirt and no cold water protection! I am going to bet he either will not go out in cold water again or will buy a wet suit or a dry suit. Fortunately, his wife wasn't there at the time and if she was, then in trying help him she may have gotten into trouble herself in her cotton sweat suit.

Be careful out there in the cold water this time of year and don't let the warm air lure you into a trip without protection.
Thank you for posting this because I am a new kayak fisherman and didnt think i need CWP this time of year. You may have just saved my life. Thank You.
 

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I am not a yaker but feb 06 I had a friend go into the water at jordan point . He was in the boat when I went to get the truck and trailer, I stopped to use the bathroom,went to the truck. took off my rainsuit drove to the ramp and backed the trailer into the water. When I got to the boathe was not there , I heard a gurgle and knew right away he was in the water.In that amount of time he was unable to assist me trying to get him in the boat,luckily a few guys were around the ramp and helped me get him in the boat.
We got him into a warm bathroom undressed him and got him in dry clothes. When the rescue squad got there ,he was starting to talk and move well by then his core temp was 93 Degrees On the lower end of moderate hypotherema.
If I had been delayed at the truck at all he would have been gone.He was pretty closeas it was. To this day he has no idea how he got into the water.
 

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