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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Here's some video from last week at an oyster bar known as Jones Shore, just above Point Lookout on the MD side of the Lower Potomac.

 

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That is great news. That is a big step in cleaning up the bay. Oysters work for free and never take time off!.................Gary
 

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Great to see a reef that is not silted over by dredging and the like or decimated by cow nose rays sush as here in the upper bay! All I can say is yummy in the future, glad to see it is working in some parts of the bay. By the video reef kinda looks like a shallow reef probably a good thing as long as it's a protected reef. Don't know much about this one.
 

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I've been following Marty's posts on Facebook. Really great news. Diving the reef, he reported seeing the usual suspects (black sea bass, stripers) but also lots of gag grouper. Who would have thought they'd be that far up the Bay?

Regarding rays, I would think that mouth of the Potomac would have as many rays as anywhere else. And with all the oyster restorations folks I know, none have ever mentioned anything to me about rays damaging reefs in the mid/upper Bay. The lower Severn has tons of rays, yet the reefs there are doing great. Are we sure rays are really the reef killer that they're advertised to be?
 

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Thats cool, but are they the "tripoly" chromosomes? If so I believe they dont reproduce. I went to an oyster festival and they where saying that the regular bi-chromosone oysters suffer from a disease that kills them off in 2 years.

So whats the long term plan.....for humans to keep making oyster beds, and populating it with spat?
 

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Thats cool, but are they the "tripoly" chromosomes? If so I believe they dont reproduce. I went to an oyster festival and they where saying that the regular bi-chromosone oysters suffer from a disease that kills them off in 2 years.

So whats the long term plan.....for humans to keep making oyster beds, and populating it with spat?
Adam, my understanding is that this is all natural spat set from wild, reproducing oysters. Oysters may have been planted on these bars at one point, but now those oysters are reproducing at record levels. So that's the good news.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
Even better news, tonight at the Potomac River Fisheries Commission, we voted to close oystering for the season to protect this abundant spat set.

The Maryland side of the river from Tall Timbers to Cornfield Harbor is closed to give these baby oysters a chance to mature. Unprecedented move, and a big step in the right direction.

adam333 - Goose is right, these are native "diploid oysters" which mature after 3 years and can live several years longer. While there is mortality from Dermo and MSX, this is living proof that oysters are building resistance and do not die in 2 years as someone told you. The triploids are sterile and mature in 2-3 years. The Chesapeake is seeing a rebound in natural oyster reproduction, especially in the James, Piankatank and Rappahannock rivers.

Oysters are the building block of the Chesapeake ecosystem. The more the better. We now have more!
 

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Thats cool, but are they the "tripoly" chromosomes? If so I believe they dont reproduce. I went to an oyster festival and they where saying that the regular bi-chromosone oysters suffer from a disease that kills them off in 2 years.

So whats the long term plan.....for humans to keep making oyster beds, and populating it with spat?
You're the victim of Political rhetoric. Once you realize who the beneficiaries of the "oyster festival" might be, the truth will become more clear.

Oysters die after 2 or 3 years because they get harvested and eaten. I have 7 year old diploid oysters at my pier on the Patuxent that happily crank out new spat every summer....Is there disease mortality? Yes. But it is modest. 2 or 3 %.

Saying that that oysters must be harvested before they are killed by disease is a common narrative among those who harvest naturally occurring oysters for profit. In the same vein as "you must dredge the bars to clean them." Both concepts are patently false, do nothing to resolve the oyster problem, and serve only to fatten their wallets.
 

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You're the victim of Political rhetoric. Once you realize who the beneficiaries of the "oyster festival" might be, the truth will become more clear.

Oysters die after 2 or 3 years because they get harvested and eaten. I have 7 year old diploid oysters at my pier on the Patuxent that happily crank out new spat every summer....Is there disease mortality? Yes. But it is modest. 2 or 3 %.

Saying that that oysters must be harvested before they are killed by disease is a common narrative among those who harvest naturally occurring oysters for profit. In the same vein as "you must dredge the bars to clean them." Both concepts are patently false, do nothing to resolve the oyster problem, and serve only to fatten their wallets.
I've heard both arguments about whether a bar should be dredged to be kept clean/ kept from silting over, etc., and both sides sound logical to me.
I also would suspect that it could be situational, in terms of tidal flow, location, etc.
But something I haven't personally seen is evidence to support either argument.
I've heard from both camps, "I've seen it with my own eyes", but that doesn't hunt with me.
I'd like to see some solid proof or to see it with MY own eyes.

I pray that this thread doesn't degrade into something we don't want, because I'm asking out of genuine interest, and not to get anything started.
 

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I've heard both arguments about whether a bar should be dredged to be kept clean/ kept from silting over, etc., and both sides sound logical to me.
I also would suspect that it could be situational, in terms of tidal flow, location, etc.
But something I haven't personally seen is evidence to support either argument.
I've heard from both camps, "I've seen it with my own eyes", but that doesn't hunt with me.
I'd like to see some solid proof or to see it with MY own eyes.

I pray that this thread doesn't degrade into something we don't want, because I'm asking out of genuine interest, and not to get anything started.
I believe there is evidence that three-dimensional bars do much better then flat dredged areas and are much less prone to silting over. The two best things we could do for the bay would be greatly reducing nutrient loads and re-establishing our filter feeders. For this to happen we would need a lot of co-operation between watermen, conservation groups, politicians and taxpayers. Lot of head waters here makes it unlikely.
 

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I thought the DNR did a power dredge study in the Upper Bay, possibly Love Point area, and the results indicated that power dredging wasn't as beneficial as was thought?
 

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You could not give me enough reason's to get me to believe that harvesting and dredging oysters is good.

Good to Eat YES - Love them, but we are at the end of our resources.

Great to see the good work- I hope they continue.

Remember when we didn't have Rockfish in the bay and Gov Schaefer's Moratorium? We went without for a while, but the results are undeniable.

Tuna
 
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