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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I think I am going to replace my trailer lights this year. Has anyone tries the LED lights? If so how long have you had them and have you had any problems?

I really don't mind spending almost twice as much for new lights as long as they will last a couple of years before I have to deal with them.

Your experiences are most appreciated.

ND
 

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I put them on my trailer when I bought it 2 years ago. I love them and will not go back to regular lights. Best thing is visibility. Day or night, they are incredible. Only down side is the cheap ones (can't remember the name) only last about a year before the diodes fail. But they have a lifetime warranty, I just take them back to Boaters World with the receipt and they give me a new set. But if you don't want the hassle, get Piranah (sp.?). Expensive but they will last.

My 2 cents. :D
 

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I replaced my old lights with LEDs 3 years ago and have had no problems. The only problem I have had since, was my own fault for not using heat shrink butt connectors on the wiring... Well worth the money.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks

All,

Thanks for the comments. Looks like I will definately do this route.

I am also replacing my 4 side marker lights (on the fenders). Did any of you guys take the extra time to solder the connections instead of using crimp connectors?

ND
 

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All,

Thanks for the comments. Looks like I will definately do this route.

I am also replacing my 4 side marker lights (on the fenders). Did any of you guys take the extra time to solder the connections instead of using crimp connectors?

ND
This spring I'm going to replace my trailer lights with LED. I contacted the manufacture (LoadRite) and asked what the best way was to splice wires. They said soldering was not necessary. They recommended using quality heat shrink butt connectors and then cover connector with liquid electrical tape. ... I think that is what I'm going to do.

MB
 

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I have had mine on for a little over a month now and I have never had a problem with them. The boat has not been in the water sense they where put on but still no problems. I just crimped and then put on two coats of liquid tape and make sure you get it down into the ends of the crimps, Thats what I did and I have not had any problems as of yet.
 

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I have just incandescent wesbar lights light on my trailer. Thgey have been there for three years now. When I strip my wires I dip them in dielectric grease, crimp them and then coat them with liquid tape.

I tend to have more problems with the mounting bolts than with the wiring. Those plastic slots that hold the nuts in place are a terrible design.
 

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Last time I changed a light bulb in my incadescents (sp?) was about four years ago. Fisxtures themselves are about eight years old. No problems so far. Like someone above said it's more a problem to keep the bolts coated with liquid galvanization than it is to maintain the lights themselves.
 

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I been dipping them for around 10 years now and still going without any problems. The side lights grounding have had problems several times do to salt in the conection to trailer but not "in" the lights.
 

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Last time I changed a light bulb in my incadescents (sp?) was about four years ago. Fisxtures themselves are about eight years old. No problems so far. Like someone above said it's more a problem to keep the bolts coated with liquid galvanization than it is to maintain the lights themselves.
I concur. Not sure why so many folks have so much trouble with the tail lights on a boat trailer, from April to December mine get dunked 2-3 times a week, I'm going on 4 years without replacing a bulb. I would however recomend soldering all connections, especially if they will be submersed.
Pat in Joppa
 

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Led's @ Bps

Starting Saturday 2/24/07 BPS has a LED trailer light kit for $49.88. It looks like they come with mounting hardware, license bracket, electrical connectors, and 25' of wire.

Bob
 

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For splicing wires buy the good (Ancor) heat shrink connectors and then slide a piece of heat shrink tubing over that.Ancor is expensive but has a glue in it that really keeps everything waterproof. FYI-grind a dime size spot where the ground wire attaches and use a SS bolt/nut. Skip
 

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I concur. Not sure why so many folks have so much trouble with the tail lights on a boat trailer, from April to December mine get dunked 2-3 times a week, I'm going on 4 years without replacing a bulb. I would however recomend soldering all connections, especially if they will be submersed.
Pat in Joppa
I agree with Pat about soldering. I've been an electronics tech for close to 30 years now, and here's my take in crimp vs soldering: Crimping is a mechanical connection. They can wiggle loose, the crimp my not be good, and corrosion can get into the butt splice. Soldering, if done correctly, makes the connection one wire. Here's how I do it. Strip both wires, make sure you don't nick the wires, and work any stray strands back into the wire. Tin both wires (use rosin coated solder). Clean the flux off the wires with isopropyl (90%) alcohol and a trimmed down flux brush. Slide a piece of heat shrink over one wire. Make a hook in each tinned end, and hook them together, pressing the hooks tight. Solder the wires together, using just enough solder to provide a good connection. Clean the flux off the wires again. Slide the shrink over the connection and shrink it. Then coat everything with liquid electrical tape. This should give you a watertight connection that will not pull apart.
 
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