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I've got a new BYC rod and shimano soros reel on the way... To replace the setup that went swimming at the rips this spring (where I dove in after it and drew a lot of criticism here). Only thing I'm questioning is which line to use.

I've always used 20 lb PP but am thinking of going down to 10 based on what I've read over the years here. Need some reassurance that it's enough, even for cbbt, the flats, and CCNPP... which is where 95+% of my serious striper fishing takes place.

Also, which brand? I'm hoping to increase sensitivity, especially in current, by reducing the line's drag thru the water. Jigging BKD's almost all of the time.
 

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Hi Josh,

I have stuck with the 10 lb fireline (green) since introduced to it by 'the force masters'.

I can't ever remember it breaking when fighting stripers up to 46 inches. I just figure 'if it aint broke, don't fix it'.

Now, I did just buy a spool of 20 lb at bps, mainly for cbbt feeshing (hoping to get a few trips down there).
Good luck
:D
 

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Josh, The only time I use 20# is in the ocean when I'm catching a lot of big fish and don't want to stress them. I've caught stripers to 40# on 10# Fireline and never had a problem. Ten# is more sensative and you'll feel more strikes. Go with 10 if it's for the bay or CBBT.
 

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Josh, did you order the Saros 3000 or 4000 reel. I hear they are nice reels for the money. I have other shimanos that I have used in the bay and they work great but they don't seem to hold up to the salt water as well as the Penn SS series does- corrosion wise. I scrub my rods and reels every trip with soap and water but after all of my trips the Penns seem to hold up better. What do you think?
 

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Dave, all my reels are Stradic FI's and regular Stradics.. Never a problem. I hear nothing but good things a bout Saro's for the money.. and the new size 3000's are perfect for the bay and ocean
 

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Tom Hughes Guide Service
410.744.2351 OfficeFull Time443.690.3164 Boat
Fly & Light Tackle Fishing Guide

JoshKaptur: I strongly recommend at least 20 lb. test fiber line especially if you're fishing the CBBT or the Susquehanna Flats. These are 2 prime locations to get into some 35 to 45 lb stripers. Keep a tight drag and you'll feel every movement the fish makes during the fight. It will also stop you from exhausting these larger stripers.

I personally spool up with 30# braid for the reasons I stated above. If you haven't seen the VIDEO that Shawn Kimbro filmed last year on my boat at the CBBT please take a look.

In the last section you will see a 42" striped bass on the end of braided line, with a 6' 30# quality fluorocarbon leader. Watch the rod and you'll see that the fish had big shoulders.
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Tight Lines,

Capt. Tom Hughes
Now Booking Summer, Fall, & CBBT Trips
 

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Josh,
Real simple. 10 pound stuff will give you notable better feel on the bottom, alllow you to get down to the bottom quicker, use lighter jigheads, and will catch more fish. There is a notable difference.

The flip side is that with the 20lb stuff you can really horse fish in. This is especially popular when jerking CBBT fish off the pilings, or stopping horses in the current of the rips. With 20lb Fireline and 40lb flouro the weak part of my rig is literally the hook! If I tighten the drag down too much it striaghtens the hook out. That's some serious ass you can put in a fish.

I normally use the 20lb stuff at the CBBT and RIPS on 4000 size reels, and the 10lb stuff the rest of the year with 2500 size reels.

Also-if you only got a 2500 size Saros use 10lb stuff. If you crank the drag down and horse them in om a 2500 Saros, you're gonna rip the gears out, trust me.
 

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Tom Hughes Guide Service
410.744.2351 OfficeFull Time443.690.3164 Boat
Fly & Light Tackle Fishing Guide

Clarification: Keeping a Tight Drag
1) Hold the rod vertical
2) Tighten the drag setting on the reel until when pulling on the line through the end eye of the rod, the rod will bend to 90 degrees before the line starts moving off the reel.

Playing the Fish:
1) Set the Hook.
2) Keep the rod at approximately 30 degrees above the horizon. At 30 degrees this allows you to put pressure on the fish as the rod and reel are working as a team.
NOTE: On larger fish - the drag will allow line to go out, do not crank the reel handle when this is happening. Each time the drag stops zinging crank on the reel handle to take up line and put pressure on the fish. If you have the drag set correctly reel damage will not occur. The fish will not be horsed in, the hook should not straighten out, and the fish should not be over stressed.
________________
Tight Lines,

Capt. Tom Hughes
Now Booking Summer, Fall, & CBBT Trips
 

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30 lb test.. Hmmm. Something to think about.. Tom, would you say you do that because of your clients abilities, or lack there of ? And what size reel are you using with 30lb braid, or " fiber line" .

I've seen Phil Brown, aka Rattletrap, land a 36" fish with a Stradic 1000 spooled with " Butt Floss". He's also one of the best fisherman on this board, in my humble opinion.
 

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Josh, I think it depends on where you're fishing. At the CBBT, I really think bigger is better, reason being, a lot of the fish there are suspended. Heavier line allows your lure to sink slower, drift faster, and stay in the strike zone longer, one of the reasons the long rod works so well there. I had to get my butt kicked a half-dozen times there before I figured that out.

On the other hand, I know you like to fish the CCNPP and jig the shallower BB pilings, places you need to feel for the bottom. In that situation, 10 pound is far superior. It's more sensitive and sinks a lot faster. (There are places like the islands and tubes at the CBBT where lighter line is better.) My philosophy is to go with the light line and then make adjustments with the weight of the jig head, but I've seen the opposite strategy work just as well.

I think the important thing is to choose your strategy and stay with it. Constantly changing means you're always adjusting. Please let us know what you decide.
 

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I have tried 10 ..20 and 30...there is no doubt in my mind that 10# has the best feel...I like Power pro the best.....Red when I can find it.....flame green fireline is good to...I like the color so I can see my line....I use 20# in Jan when we go looking for gannets and Bigguns....Good Luck!
 

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Don't those reels come with an extra spool? If so, put 10lb fireline or 15 lb powerpro (equivalent diameters) on one spool and 20lb fireline or 20lb pp (again, equivalent diameters) on the other.
 

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Last year I used 10-lb PowerPro on a reel that I used for winter-time pickerel fishing. Typically, I was throwing light weight lures. I ended up having quite a bit of trouble with wind knots.

If you are casting heavier lures and doing more vertical jigging, this should not be an issue for you.
 

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Josh,
First off it was really good seeing you last night and I just can’t wait to get started on your new replacement rod. I think you and I talked about everything last night except this topic, I like using the 15# power pro "red or yellow" and I have that on all the reels you seen in the garage last night. If you need any power pro let me know I can get for a better price then you can get it at any store and I get the 1500 yd spools. :thumbup: I’m going to get started on the marbling tonight and I just might take off a few hours early today just to get started on it.
 

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-For throwing 4 & 5 oz custom plugs on the flats (or anywhere) 10# won't cut it. 20-30# is the only way to go.

-Bait fishing up river (the susky) from an anchored boat, 10# wont cut it in the heavy current. Yes, it will turn a 30# fish... be we aint looking for 30# fish up there. A 50#er will spool ya. Again, 20-30#. Plus we dont want to fight a fish for 45 min in that current, get em to the boat quick(er) if you can.

Other than that, its 10# PP on all of my spinning gear, for the flats & ocean.
 

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At the CBBT, I really think bigger is better, reason being, a lot of the fish there are suspended. Heavier line allows your lure to sink slower, drift faster, and stay in the strike zone longer, one of the reasons the long rod works so well there. I had to get my butt kicked a half-dozen times there before I figured that out.
Dang Shawn! That's letting the cat out of the bag. That is a good point and I have a special reel spooled up for that reason with 30lb flouro only. That, combined with a lure like a bucktail or something that sinks slower and "breathes" can make everyone else at the CBBT look like they are using a Mickey Mouse outfit when you are smacking them dead. It's normally one of those secrets people don't really talk about.

Except for the CBBT in the past three years I have never seen it be an issue before. It's a very specialized thing. It may be the same way at times at the 50 bay bridge, I just don't fish there very often.
 
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