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Last week i was powder painting some jigheads. My strategy is to heat them up in the oven, dip them in powder, and then bake them in the oven for a while after painting. It really smooths the coat and after cooling the paint is really hard.

My g/f comes home and asks a good question that i didn't know the answer to.

Is it safe to be heating up lead and powder paint in your regular cooking oven?
 

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I damn sure would'nt do it.......I think a better idea would be to pick up a used toaster oven and designate it for that use.
I agree, everything I've heard about powder coating anything suggests you have a dedicated oven.
 

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WOW! Powder coated cookies...Just imagine what some of those cookies would look like! I bet we could come up with some pretty cool colors!:chef:

I think I would get a dedicated oven to cure the lures in...
 

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It's not the paint that will cause problems, lead is especially hazardous. The temperatures required to cure the powder coat are not high enough to cause lead vapors which are highly hazardous.

If you are using your oven, clean it well. Brain damage is a terrible by product to lure making.
 

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It's not really a good idea for anything concerning lead. Lead can get into your system many different ways. However, lead melts at around 600 degrees. The lead lures you poured are cooled and hardened to a temp that is much less than 600 degrees when you take them out of the mold. When you heat them in the oven, you are heating them to around 350 degrees which is way below the melting point. Then you are dipping them in powderpaint that is room temp and allowing the pain to flow, cool and harden. Then you are putting them back in the oven to cure at 350 for about 15 min.

I use a toaster oven myself and I have not seen a film deposit or smelled any fumes when curing powder paint .

You are probably safe but why take a chance when you can get a yardsale toaster oven for around 10 bucks.
 

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Sounds like the " BJ's" are over....

I liken this to Seinfeld, where George and Susan are engaged to married. George buys cheap wedding invitations, the glue on the envelopes kills Susan, George is happy....

Mr. Robertson, I'll be reporting you to the local authorities....:wacko::wacko::wacko:
 

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I use a long lighter, the kind used for starting fireplaces to heat the lead and dip in paint in my garage. Never baked them in the oven after. The paint will chip easier but I can LIVE with that:D
 

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It's not really a good idea for anything concerning lead. Lead can get into your system many different ways. However, lead melts at around 600 degrees. The lead lures you poured are cooled and hardened to a temp that is much less than 600 degrees when you take them out of the mold. When you heat them in the oven, you are heating them to around 350 degrees which is way below the melting point. Then you are dipping them in powderpaint that is room temp and allowing the pain to flow, cool and harden. Then you are putting them back in the oven to cure at 350 for about 15 min.

I use a toaster oven myself and I have not seen a film deposit or smelled any fumes when curing powder paint .

You are probably safe but why take a chance when you can get a yardsale toaster oven for around 10 bucks.
Yeah, a cheap yardsale toater oven sounds like a great idea.
Especially since I'm not sure that the lead would have to "melt" to give off dangerous fumes. I'd be willing to bet that it gives off fumes even at 350 degrees.:wacko:
 

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Lead doesn't begin to give off fumes until it gets above 900 F, so I doubt if thats going to be a problem.

The paint fumes, though...

I know some folks do it outdoors in their clam-shell style barbecues. Keep the paint smells out of the house, and everybody stays happy.
 

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Seriously......Me and my pals used to play with lead.....casting sinkers, soldiers, all that. We would also play with mercury.
We would be bent over some electronic circuit soldering for hour after hour.

The teacher in chem 1 would pass around a little blob of mercury so everyone had a chance to hold it.
Me and the other nerds would press the mercury out of old mercury batteries.
We would sand the bottom of boats that had been painted with lead paint.

Now some of these nerdy friends of mine who did all these things went on to be PhD scientists in the space program. None of these nerdy, lead and mercury damaged friends of mine ever showed any sign of brain damage. They all including myself went into technical fields where brain damage would be a distinct disadvantage.

So my question is.....If these heavy metals are so dangerous, why can't I see any evidence of any brain damage or any other damage to any of these old friends of mine?
 
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