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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Several times lately, this quote has been thrown up:



However, the quote is doctored. The full quote is:

[q]Those who would give up essential liberty ,to purchase a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty or safety. [/q]

The word essential being an essential part of the quote is left out to make it all encompassing. In the same spirit I would like to offer a few selected quotes from other political figures and documents:

Mister - down this wall! (Ronald Reagan)
4 score and seven years ago, we perish from this earth. (Abraham Lincoln)
Read my lips, no taxes! (George HW Bush)
We the order form establish justice. (The US Consitution)
We hold that all men are endowed. (The Declaration of Independence)
Give me death! (Patrick Henry)
A day that will live in the armed forces of Japan. (FDR)
I did have sexual relations with that woman, Miss Lewinsky! (Bill Clinton)
 

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[Q]Fritzer originally wrote:
Several times lately, this quote has been thrown up:

However, the quote is doctored. The full quote is:

[q]Those who would give up essential liberty ,to purchase a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty or safety. [/q]

[/Q]The actual quote, from Bartlett's is:
They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety.
Does "purchase" mean the same thing as "obtain"?
Seems you're as much a misquoting culprit as all the rest.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Well, if you're going to be picky...

[q] Those who would give up Essential Liberty to purchase a little Temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety.
This statement was used as a motto on the title page of An Historical Review of the Constitution and Government of Pennsylvania. (1759) which was attributed to Franklin in the edition of 1812, but in a letter of September 27, 1760 to David Hume, he states that he published this book and denies that he wrote it, other than a few remarks that were credited to the Pennsylvania Assembly, in which he served. The phrase itself was first used in a letter from that Assembly dated November 11, 1755 to the Governor of Pennsylvania. An article on the origins of this statement here includes a scan that indicates the original typography of the 1759 document. Researchers now believe that a fellow diplomat by the name of Richard Jackson to be the primary author of the book. With the information thus far available the issue of authorship of the statement is not yet definitely resolved, but the evidence indicates it was very likely Franklin, who in the Poor Richard's Almanack of 1738 is known to have written a similar proverb: "Sell not virtue to purchase wealth, nor Liberty to purchase power."
Many variants derived from this phrase have arisen and have usually been incorrectly attributed to Franklin:
"They that can give up essential liberty to purchase a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety."
"They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety."
"He who would trade liberty for some temporary security, deserves neither liberty nor security"
"He who sacrifices freedom for security deserves neither"
"If we restrict liberty to attain security we will lose them both."
"Any society that would give up a little liberty to gain a little security will deserve neither and lose both."
[/q]
 

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Glad to see some good "sources" other than the blogs. I offered Bartlett's which is by no means definitive but is accepted as a reputable source by most scholars.
 
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