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Article in todays SUN paper says ROCKFISH DISEASE is more common and Charter Boat Captains are seeing fewer fisherman who want to fish for rockfish.

The state health and environmental officials have stressed that rockfish are safe to eat if thoroughly cooked and remind anglers to wash their hands after touching fish and no one should handle fish that have open lesions.

Article was written by ASSOCIATED PRESS

Norm
 

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I think this is the same article, but in the Post.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/05/11/AR2006051101728.html
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Scientists Study Rockfish Disease

By KRISTEN WYATT
The Associated Press
Thursday, May 11, 2006; 8:14 PM

ANNAPOLIS, Md. -- A wasting disease that attacks rockfish is becoming more common in the Chesapeake Bay _ but scientists aren't sure why or what to do about it.

At a three-day summit on the disease, mycobacteriosis, scientists from two federal agencies and several states shared what they know about the disease also called fish handlers' disease. By the end of the summit Thursday, they announced they don't know much.

For example, scientists aren't sure how the rockfish catch mycobacteriosis, often called "myco." They don't know whether it kills the rockfish, or striped bass, or whether environmental factors are making the disease more common.

But they do know more fish are getting it, at least in Maryland waters. About 25 percent of rockfish in the Maryland portion of the Chesapeake Bay had mycobacteriosis in 1998, and by 2005 about 62 percent had it, said Larry Pieper, a biologist for the Maryland Department of Natural Resources. In some areas scientists have found up to 80 percent of the rockfish have the disease.

The wasting disease is generally harmless to humans, if the fish are handled properly, but news of the bacteria's spread has alarmed some anglers. The Maryland DNR has reported that charter boat captains are seeing fewer fishermen who want to fish for rockfish, a popular sporting fish in the state.

The fish's popularity makes it important for more study of mycobacteriosis, scientists said. Conference attendees included officials with the U.S. Geological Survey, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, plus state biologists from Delaware, Maryland and Virginia.

"We need to be working together," said Steve Minkkinen of the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service in Annapolis.

Among the questions laid out for answers Thursday was how many rockfish have the disease, and where they're located. The disease has been detected in rockfish as far away as the Hudson River in New York, and rockfish migrate up and down the East Coast, but biologists conceded they have only a fuzzy picture of how prevalent the disease is in different waters.

"It's not simple to say that all of the striped bass in the Chesapeake Bay are infected. Different populations seem to be infected at different rates," said Chris Ottinger, research biologist for the U.S. Geological Survey from West Virginia.

The point of the summit was to start planning how to best study the mycobacteriosis to see if it's a threat to the whole fishery, they said.

"This is a long-term approach, a continuous approach," said John Jacobs, a fisheries biologist for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in Oxford, Md. "There's some work being done, but perhaps not enough."
 

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[q] The point of the summit was to start planning how to best study the mycobacteriosis to see if it's a threat to the whole fishery, they said.
[/q]

-----Also to TRY to meet once a year, to compare notes ---HORRAY ![sad][sad][sad]
 

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---One of the problems the SO Called Study of mycobacteriosis, scientists said. Conference attendees included officials with the U.S. Geological Survey, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, plus state biologists from Delaware, Maryland and Virginia. ---Mentioned was the lack of Carcassas to study---

-----A good refrigerated pickup truck, ( even if loaned or rented ) could be used to get OOOODLES of subjects for All the needs of these ******hes-----

-----90 % of all rockfish cleaned do not open the lower body cavitiy meaning a sealed package to be studied at lesiure in thier labs.----Seems a shame when needed items END up in the Dumpster-----

--------Study away folks, Inquring minds like myself , will expect the same news of Gloom & Doom , just before next years Trophy season-----OH WELL------

[shy][shy]
 

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----wonder why ******hes is * out ?--a bad word?

---Guess so ---Word used was like a private eye---starting with slu
 

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Norm and scotty, one of my friends has had a boat in a slip on the bay since opening day and caught all big healthy fish during spawn. Now back to resident population the sick fish with sores have appeared. One factor that re-occurs is that all of the sick fish have broken lines in their stripes, possibly making these hybrids or farm raised. Is it possible that fish not naturally raised in the cheasapeake do not possess the immunities needed to survive? Or maybe something gone wrong at a hatchery? Just some ideas and observations from a few guys who spent a heck of alot more time and money chasing striped bass.
 

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[q] One factor that re-occurs is that all of the sick fish have broken lines in their stripes, [/q]

---I am of the humble opinion that broken stripes could be the result of Scar tissue----

----I'm sure that not all losses of scales , develop into Lesions, minor scaring in fish must occur on a daily basis, just like minor wounds that scar our outer skin----Fritzer--Ziggy ----(comment) ?
 
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