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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
here is the first pic. I think I increased the ISO to about 400 on this stadium shot. Can't remember the ap or shutter speed but I want to say is was about 5.6 at 135mm, about as low as i can go. Anyway want to improve on the clairity help on the lighting. It is a Nikon d80 with a nikon AF-S 18-135mml: 3.5-5.6 ED I have some other challanges as well with other pics I will post later. thanks for the input

 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Here is another. There is not as much detail and no artificial light but any help would be appreciated

 

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Band pic

whitebite, I took a few seconds to play with it and this is a "quickie". First of all you shot it with an ISO of 1250 at 1/60 and aperature 5.6. All I did was "pop" levels to lighten and shift the white scale to not burn out the highlights. It is always difficult to work with someone else's work grabbed from the internet but hopefully this comes through.



I think a little "unsharp" filter could bring out more detail. Try it with yours.
 

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Sunset

First, I kinda like it as a silhouette because the sky is a beautiful fall sky. Bringing out the background can create some problems because you can cause a conflict between the sky and the trees, water, etc which really has nice tones.

I played with it just with levels again but some hue/sat adjustment can correct the sky to your liking by desaturating or color shifting it. This one's a little orange for me but it brought out the foxtails a little better.

 

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Using a tripod may help with the sharpness of the subjects. When shooting sporting events you want to use f stops that will let the most light into the camera, f 2.8 or f 4, giving you the fastest shutter speed for the light you are shooting in. I would set the f stop and then put camera on Auto which will adjust your shutter speed according to the light. Be careful increasing the iso too much, anything over 400 on the Nikon results in a lot of grain in a picture. Shooting in the dark at stadiums is difficult, don't be discouraged.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for all of the tips folks. I wish I would have read some prior to the game but I did make some progress on my shots. I will try to post some up tomorrow. It was tough though because on top of the dark stadium we also had a bit of a mist.

anyway - here is another one that I took this past weekend. Much easier subject but I just don't think the facial clairity it right. Maybe I am just being too picky and as in the previous suggestion maybe a tri or mono pod would have helped.

 

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Whitebite,

I apologize for yesterday's answer. I thought that you were asking how you could "save" what you had POST production, whereas Jay really answered the question you asked. When I "missed" it, tell me. I don't mind a bit. I have been known to "misread" things in the past.

To me, the greatest thing about the modern cameras is that you don't have to write down the settings that you used like in the old days to figure out what went wrong with your pictures that you now have developed and are less than what you were going for. Daylight pictures on sunny days are "easy". Shady areas or backlit areas still get tricky. Dusk or nighttime is a learning experience.

First thing you need to do is to know the limitations of your equipment for the task at hand. If you are not using flash, you need a tripod to go less than 1/60 because of camera shake. I find that the newer lighter cameras are easier to shake than the old metal body ones. Image stabilization in the lens or in the camera as Canon likes to do can help.

Next you need to know you lens limitations for aperture. You can set your aperture of your camera to a f2 but you ain't getting there if the lens is only good for f4.5. If you want a lower f-stop on a big lens, then you pay bigger bucks.

Then you have to take into consideration your subject matter. Is it a scenic or action shot. If it's a scenic and there's no subject movement due to wind, etc., then that's more helpful. You have more freedom. If it has action, then you have to stop it with a flash or accept that you will get movement camera blur. Sometimes that's helpful because you can shoot a crowded street scene and "nobody's there". They all moved their way out of your time frame.

Finally for me, I don't like to go beyond an ISO of 400 due to graininess unless I want the lower definition for an "artsy" shot. With the newer digital cameras you can push it to 3200. Depending on the camera it may be grainy or not. BIG bucks for the high end Canon but if you have $8000, go for it.

I do shoot dusk pictures. I do very little night photography. In either case the new cameras are great because you can see what you have right there and not have to wait to get the film developed to correct your actions even though the "last" set of shots you took at those f-stops, that speed and that ISO were GREAT.....and these suck.

I usually take the camera and spot meter my subject and then select the f-stop that gives me the best light with the greatest depth of field that I want. Do I want to blur out the background or do I want infinity? Then I try to find the speed that will either stop whatever movement I'm interested in "freezing" or accept what blur I'm going to get. The ISO will then limit my other two choices.

I will now, with the new digitals, shoot the scene and play with it until I find something that seems to hit on what I want and delete the ****. It's really nice to be able to learn on the "spot" that you are on.

I don't really have any "set" rules of f-stops in my head except to get as low an f stop as the camera lens will allow and then pump up the depth of field that I want to fall in with the speed that gets the job done. Bracket your shots with 1/2 stop kicks on either side.

Look over on the other thread "Let' see your photos" and there is a picture of the Loch Ness at night. Shot without a tripod but resting the camera on a cement bridge to steady it. The other Busch pictures with the Waveswinger. All were done with available light. F stops in the 2.0-2.8 range and speeds from 1/1250 to 1/60.

With the "best" that I can do there, I then go to the Digital darkroom and salvage if I have to. That is the second great advantage in today's photography, but all the information that use to take up the log book that you carried with you to help you out "the next" time is stored for you on the image. You can learn from it and the histogram what you might try the next time. That's why even really good photographers get antsy at ONE TIME events like weddings. THIS IS IT!

I hope that's a better answer.

By the way......I loved your heron pictures. Some of the wing positions are awesome.
 
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