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Discussion Starter #1
My Sea Ray 225 has a badly rotted transom I need to repair. The engine is already out for replacement and I have removed the Gimbal assembly as well as many small parts that are in the way.

Cutting the old wood out is becoming a serious problem. In 1/2 day I only have about a 2sq. ft. area removed. I am removing the inner glass and wood, leaving the transom skin intact.

Are there any special cutting tools to make this a little easier?
All I have right now is a circular saw, an angle grinder, hammer and 1 chisel.[sad]
 

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There'a web site devoted to repair of rotted transoms. Try some Google searches. My recollection (somewhat dim, at best) is that, generally the entire transom gets cut out. From there, especially if it's an OB powered boat it gets interesting, since the transom must support the entire engine weight. I think, generally, it's more trouble than it's worth to try to save the skin, although I can understand why you might want to do that. I think the issue is creating a strong enough repair to be sea worthy. I would try to get more info before proceeding further.

You're going to find you will have acquired a bunch of new skills doing this project!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
No doubt it will be a venture. I have some decent information on what has to be done. I just can't find anyone with good ideas to make things go smoothly.

This boat is an I/O and has a full express cabin. That makes it almost impossible to consider a deck off repair. However, the transom wood layout looks like it will work out without going to that extreme.
 

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Sounds like a real headache! Best left to professionals?

I had a rotted transom on my old 15' Starcraft. I pumped it full of Get-rot, bolted and glued a 5/16" aluminum plate to the outside of the transome, and put another plate on the inside where the engine bolts come thru.

Never had anymore trouble!

David
 

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Dal, a good site to go to is classic mako.com. Mako owners are always replacing a rotten transom or floor. One guy on the site says he uses an electric chain saw to remove the rotten wood. It takes the wood out but doesn't harm the fiberglass. I haven't tried that but it makes sense to me. Good luck John
 

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A chain saw works if you take your time. Limit the caffeine intake before using a chainsaw.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks guys. I do have a smaller electric chainsaw for use around the yard. Ill have to give it a try.
 

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I'd say a better circular saw blade.

A good saw shouldn't have any problem cutting thru some glass and ply. And its the best way to control your cutting depth.

I too had a dead spot from water intrusion. I drilled holes from the inside into the core, hooked an aquarium air pump to them (alternating holes every week for a few months) until it dried, and then pumped a few quarts of epoxy resin w/ cabosil into it. Its solid now (knock on wood and epoxy and fiberglass [angel])
 

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Try here:

http://forums.iboats.com/cgi-bin/ubb/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=26;t=004729#000000

Do a seach "rotten transom" yielded a bunch of stuff.

Good luck!!
Jim
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks, those shots helped. At least I know I should be able to get the wood out/in without removing the deck. Looks like with a lot of patients, the chainsaw does nice work.
 

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When we did mine we cut around the skin then pulled it off. This gave me a good templet to trace out new transom. We then cut out two 3/4 new transoms. We took the two and made up a batch of West system and this stuff that thickens it up and covered one side of both cut outs. Then we screwed the two together and let set up over night. Then we buttered up the wood and the back of the boat with alot of west system and clamped the wood into place. In places below the wate line we ran in screws to help pull the wood tight (the screws where later removed and area patched with west and painted over with bottom paint). After that set up we then drilled out drain and plug holes. Then we just started glassing in the wood with alot of over kill. While we had the boat apart we checked all runners and any thing else we could check while we had it apart. I went through about two gallons of west but I know its alot tougher than it was from the factory. Its not that bad of a job . If you want Bmail me and I will send you my phone number if you want more info on how we did mine.
 

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DON'T CUT THE OUTER SKIN!!!!!

Leave the outer skin intact.
 

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[Q]Bryansfish originally wrote:
When we did mine we cut around the skin then pulled it off. This gave me a good templet to trace out new transom. We then cut out two 3/4 new transoms. We took the two and made up a batch of West system and this stuff that thickens it up and covered one side of both cut outs. Then we screwed the two together and let set up over night. Then we buttered up the wood and the back of the boat with alot of west system and clamped the wood into place. In places below the wate line we ran in screws to help pull the wood tight (the screws where later removed and area patched with west and painted over with bottom paint). After that set up we then drilled out drain and plug holes. Then we just started glassing in the wood with alot of over kill. While we had the boat apart we checked all runners and any thing else we could check while we had it apart. I went through about two gallons of west but I know its alot tougher than it was from the factory. Its not that bad of a job . If you want Bmail me and I will send you my phone number if you want more info on how we did mine.
[/Q]I did mean the skin that covers the rotted wood on the inside and not the outer transom.
 
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